Online social network platforms can considerably contribute to active ageing - however, under which conditions?
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Online social network platforms can considerably contribute to active ageing - however, under which conditions?

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Maria Schwarz-Woelzl, Teresa Holocher-Ertl (ZSI, partner of the project) will present at the International Conference PALADIN Project:: Online social network platforms can considerably contribute to ...

Maria Schwarz-Woelzl, Teresa Holocher-Ertl (ZSI, partner of the project) will present at the International Conference PALADIN Project:: Online social network platforms can considerably contribute to active ageing - however, under which conditions?

International Conference PALADIN Project
www.uc.pt
‎20-21 October 2011 University of Coimbra, Portugal "Promoting conscious and active learning and aging: How to face current and furture challenges"
http://www.uc.pt/fpce/investigacao/GruposInvestigacao/EFUC/PALADINConference

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Online social network platforms can considerably contribute to active ageing - however, under which conditions? Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Online social network platforms can considerably contribute to active ageing - however, under which conditions?
    • Maria Schwarz-Woelzl & Teresa Holocher-Ertl
    • Zentrum fuer Soziale Innovation, Vienna
    • 20th & 21st of October 2011, Coimbra
    Conference "Promoting concious and active learning and ageing"
  • 2. The potential of online social network for older people’s social activities (I) Coimbra, 20th & 21st of October 2011 Maria Schwarz-Woelzl & Teresa Holocher-Ertl Social embeddedness and meaningful interaction with ‘significant others’ are predominant health protective factors (Fratiglioni, Paillard-Borg et al. 2004). Online social network platforms (such as Facebook) have the potential to facilitate interaction, formation of social support, companionship and entertainment. They foster the link with ‘significant others’ outside the household and supports the local neighbourhood community.
  • 3. The potential of online social network for older people’s social activities (II)
    • The time older people spent in online communities correlates positively with their satisfaction with the social support they receive as well with the number of people they are in contact with (Wright 2000).
    • Virtual communities may actually augment face-to-face ones (Wright 2000; Hampton, Sessions et al. 2009).
    Coimbra, 20th & 21st of October 2011
  • 4. Structural problems prevent older people from the use of social network platforms
    • Physical constraints: decrements of sight, hearing, dexterity, motor function and cognitive processing.
    • Negative attitudes: older people often regard this fear or perception of complexity of ICT as their own fault and not as a failure in the design of the technology (Eisma, Dickinson et al. 2004).
    • Linguistic barriers: the dominance of English terms (or poor translations of them) which might cause feelings of incompetence and of being 'out of touch' with today's computer world (Thimm and Kruse 1998).
    Maria Schwarz-Woelzl & Teresa Holocher-Ertl Coimbra, 20th & 21st of October 2011
  • 5. Research Methodology: participatory user involvement
    • Framework: within the AAL project Go-myLife (AAL-2009-2-089) http://gomylife-project.eu/
    • Method: participatory workshops with 23 (16 women, 7 men) older people were held in the UK and Austria;
    Aim : Assessment of interaction patterns on online social network platforms, their usability and perceived benefits. Five online social network platforms : Facebook, Finerday, BeGrand, Seniorkom, Ahano.
  • 6. Attitudes towards social network platforms – Facebook I
    • Quick and broad scope: “…instead of keep ringing to everybody, if one person sends a message all the friends can read it, it brings close to everybody and quick as well” (man, UK)
    • The ‘Wall’ is semi-public and impersonal:
      • “ I would never write on the Wall, this would be an intrusion into my intimate life, that’s my greatest objection against Facebook.” (man, Austria/rural area)
      • “ ... I never actually receive a message on Facebook that is significant for me” (woman, Austria/urban area)
  • 7. Attitudes towards social network platforms – Facebook II
    • Self-exposing communication behaviour : “In our day one had a diary that nobody was to see and today it is exposing oneself before as many people as possible.” (woman, Austria/urban area)
    • Not appreciated for interactions with their core family : “My daughter would never accept me as a “Friend”. Her Facebook site is her own world; that’s none of my business.” (woman, Austria/urban area).
    • Poor menu navigation: “There are so many icons and pictures; it is difficult to find the tree view.” (woman, Austria/urban area).
  • 8. Attitudes towards social network platforms for older people
    • Peer communication : After all, there are many platforms but when a 38-year old Norwegian rates a holiday and I as well being a 60-year old Austrian, that doesn’t fit well.” (man, Austria/rural area).
    • Good practice example : Finerday.com
  • 9. Usability Requirements for older users
    • “ Simple as possible” is the paramount requirement!
    • Security and privacy: the ideal SN platform is absolutely safe;
    • Reliable search and sorting functions: are vital to avoid the user getting lost and overburdened with too much information;
    • Easy navigation: no scroll down, breadcrumb navigation tree, preview function and feedback, fonts are re-sizeable;
    • Easy profiling: creating and editing profiles is a challenge and potential barrier for older people in social networks;
    • Confirmation of activities: “Do you really want to leave a message on the wall”, “Your message was posted successfully”;
    • Gender sensitive: women are the main users of senior platforms;
    Coimbra, 20th & 21st of October 2011 Maria Schwarz-Woelzl & Teresa Holocher-Ertl
  • 10. Further facilitation activites and functions
    • User support systems: such as video, FAQ, telephone support, and moderated groups
    • Netiquette and monitoring: a) it regulates the use of the platform, provides a safe and secure communication environment; b) it demonstrates the seriousness of the platform
    • Features that require special attention are: a) voting and chat, as they are rarely used by older people; b) Photos and videos: contrary to initial assumptions, the sharing of photos and videos does not seem to be greatly appreciated.
    Coimbra, 20th & 21st of October 2011 Maria Schwarz-Woelzl & Teresa Holocher-Ertl
  • 11.
    • For more details see please D2.1, D2.2 and D2.3, downloadable from http://gomylife-project.eu/
    • Thank you for your attention!
    Maria Schwarz-Woelzl [email_address] Teresa Holocher-Ertl [email_address] Coimbra, 20th & 21st of October 2011