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Presidential elections v. congressional elections anderson highschool
 

Presidential elections v. congressional elections anderson highschool

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    Presidential elections v. congressional elections anderson highschool Presidential elections v. congressional elections anderson highschool Presentation Transcript

    • POPULAR VOTE:The vote for a U.S. presidential candidate made by the qualified voters, as opposed to that made by the electoral college.WINNING PERCENTAGES OF THE LAST SIX PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS:1992- 43.01%1996- 49.23%2000-47.87%2004- 50.73%2008- 52.87%2012- 50.6%
    • WINNING PERCENTAGES HOUSE CONGRESSIONAL ELECTIONS LAST SIX CONGRESSES2002-2012108th: 52%109th-55%110th-50.5%111th- 58%112th-53%113th-51%
    • WINNING PERCENTAGES SENATE ELECTIONS LAST SIX CONGRESSESOhio2002:49.5%2004: 63.9 %2006: 56.2%2008: 51.9%2010: 57.3%2012: 50.3% 2006
    • INCUMBENT ADVANTAGE Advantages: • More recognition • Easier access to Campaign Finance and government resources • Incumbents have won more over the years
    • SINGLE MEMBER DISTRICTAn electoral district, or constituency having a single representative in a legislative body, rather then having 2 or more.Impacts the winning percentages because you can win with a lesser percentage then someone else.Eliminates third party votes.
    • WHY ARE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS MUCH CLOSER THAN THE AVERAGE HOUSE/SENATE ELECTIONThe whole country votes, so there is a broader variety of votersMore people take interest in the presidential election.
    • HOUSE/SENATE ELECTIONSStates lean towards one party, causing that party to be elected into office every time there is an electionExample would be that California is primarily Democrat, so usually a Democratic candidate gets elected everytime
    • DIVIDED GOVERNMENTOne party controls the white house and another controls both houses of congressUSA is mainly a divided government.
    • QUESTIONS1. What is divided government?2. What is the popular vote?3. One advantage of being an Incumbent.4. What is a single member district?5. What party does California primarily lean?