Comparing Social Media Tools
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Comparing Social Media Tools

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Comparing Social Media Tools Comparing Social Media Tools Document Transcript

  •               Comparing  Social  Media  Tools                               By  Michelle  Golden               This  document  includes  adapted  excerpts  from     Social  Media  Strategies  for  Professionals  and  their  Firms:     The  Guide  to  Establishing  Credibility  and  Accelerating  Relationships     ©2010  John  Wiley  &  Sons     Not  for  duplication.     1  ©2010  Golden  Practices,  Inc.     michelle@goldenpractices.com  
  •  COMPARING  SOCIAL  MEDIA  TOOLS  At  present,  there  are  four  new  media  tools  that  are  most  suitable  for  professionals  and  their  firms:  LinkedIn,  Twitter,  Facebook,  and  blogs.  The  pace  of  innovation  is  rapid  so  these  are  unlikely  to  be  the  most  popular  and  appropriate  tools  for  your  business  use  in  a  few  years.  New  tools  continuously  emerge  and  some  will  build  upon  or  replace  these  tools.  Therefore,  as  you  read,  and  later  as  you  formulate  your  strategy,  it’s  important  to  consider  the  objectives  each  tool  helps  you  accomplish  (through  its  features)  rather  than  focusing  on  a  tool’s  current  popularity  alone.    Popularity  is  certainly  a  legitimate  consideration,  however,  because  of  the  need  to  assure  that  you  are  in  the  correct  space  to  find  and  interact  with  the  people  you  seek,  and  because  of  the  value  of  critical  mass,  for  instance,  a  tool  like  LinkedIn  or  Facebook  is  exponentially  more  valuable  because  of  the  sheer  number  of  people  on  it.  Recognizing  that  new  tools  will  continually  emerge  reinforces  the  importance  of  clarity  in  your  marketing  objectives—your  purpose—behind  adopting  any  specific  tool.    Unless  you  have  the  tremendous  time  and  resources  it  takes  to  establish  a  strong  presence  everywhere  at  once,  you’ll  want  to  decide  which  new  media  to  explore  and,  among  those,  what  to  bite  off  first.  These  tables  are  subjective,  based  on  my  experience  with  the  way  CPAs  and  lawyers  would  and  do  use  the  tools.  People  in  other  professions  may  experience  greater  or  lesser  usefulness  or  concerns  with  the  tools  assessed  in  the  tables  on  the  following  page.       2  ©2010  Golden  Practices,  Inc.     michelle@goldenpractices.com  
  •  Compare  Usefulness  (based  on  moderate  to  excellent  use  of  the  tool)     Objectives  or  Benefits   LinkedIn     Twitter   Facebook   Blogs   (C  =  credibility  oriented,  N  =  networking  oriented)   Obtain  answers  to  questions  (C)               Demonstrate  your  expertise,  establish  credibility  (C)               Increase  your  knowledge  (C)               Distribute  content  (C)               Sustain  customer  loyalty  when  things  go  wrong  (C)               Communicate  without  distributing  content  (firm               developed  or  otherwise)  (N)   Promote  others  (building  goodwill)  (N)               Conducive  to  deepening  relationships  and  building               rapport  (N)   Connect  others  together  (facilitate  mutually  beneficial               introductions)  (N)   Regularly  alerted  to  opportunities  for  interaction                 (reasons  to  reach  out  as  others  update)  (N)   Identify  resources  (N)               Maintain  contact  and  reconnect  (N)               Meet  new  people  (N)               Promote  events  and  firm-­‐hosted  activities  (C/N)               Recruiting  (via  a  firm  vs.  individual  presence)  (C/N)              Concerns  (more  stars  =  greater  concern)   Concerns   LinkedIn     Twitter   Facebook   Blogs   Business/personal  crossover  among  contacts   N/A         N/A   Time  investment  to  be  effective               Noticeable  if  absent               Process  needs/considerations  for  best  execution               (internal,  firm  level)    These  objectives,  benefits,  and  concerns  can  also  be  considered  when  you  need  to  evaluate  new  tools  as  they  emerge.  After  weighing  these  factors,  you  can  determine  if  migration  from  a  current  tool  to  a  new  one  is  best.     3  ©2010  Golden  Practices,  Inc.     michelle@goldenpractices.com