2005-2008 TALC Strategic Plan

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Strategic Plan for 2005-2008 prepared for Transform (previously Transportation & Land Use Coalition).

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2005-2008 TALC Strategic Plan

  1. 1. GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLDCLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANS-PORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COM-MUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COM-MUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-TION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITYHEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES •WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE COALITION• TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ANDCOMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT Strategic Plan: 2005-2008COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-TION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITYHEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES •WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION• TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ANDCOMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREATCOMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-TION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITYHEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES •WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION• TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ANDCOMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREATCOMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-TION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITYHEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES •WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION• TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ANDCOMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREATCOMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-TION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITYHEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES •WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION• TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ANDCOMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREATCOMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-TION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITYHEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES •WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION• TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ANDCOMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREATCOMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-TION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITYHEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES •WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION• TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY ANDCOMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREATCOMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASSTRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH • GREAT COMMUNITIES • WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION • TRANSPORTA-
  2. 2. Board of Directors Juliet EllisT he Transportation and Land Use Coalition Urban Habitat (TALC) is a partnership of over 90 environ- Debbie Hubsmith mental, social justice, and community groups Bay Area Bicycle Coalitionworking for a sustainable and socially just Bay Area. Jeremy MadsenThe 2005-2008 Strategic Plan describes TALC’s vi- Greenbelt Alliancesion for the region, strategies and actions to realize Jeremy Nelsonthat vision, and indicators to measure success. Transportation for a Livable CityThe plan revolves around three broad initiatives, Margaret Okuzumieach one encompassing specific campaigns TALC BayRail Alliancewill lead, or play a supporting role in, over the next Geeta Raothree years. The Are We Succeeding? section includes Non-Profit Housing Assoc. of Northern CAa chart describing how success in each campaign can Anita Reescombine to improve the Bay Area’s quality of life, LIFETIMEprotect our natural environment, and build a strong, Roxanne Sanchezequitable economy. SEIU, Local 790, BART Chapter Dick Schneider Sierra ClubTABLE OF CONTENTS Rev. Andre Shumake Richmond Improvement AssociationTALC’s Vision ................................................................1 Jess WendoverGreat Communities Initiative ........................................3 Urban Ecology Planning Great Communities...5 Changing the Framework for Growth...6 Stuart Cohen Executive DirectorWorld Class Transportation Initiative ............................7 Revitalizing Urban Transit Campaign...8 Regional Rail Campaign...9 Safe Routes to Schools and Transit Campaign...10 Mission Statement Funding World Class Transportation Campaign...11 TALC is a partnership of over 90 Promoting Healthy, Sustainable Travel Campaign...12 groups working for a sustainable and socially just Bay Area. We envision aTransportation Equity and Community Health Initiative..13 region with healthy, walkable com- Lifeline Transportation Campaign...14 munities that provide all residents with Access to Health Campaign...15 transportation choices and affordable Training Sessions and Capacity Building...16 housing. TALC analyzes county and regional policies, works with com-Are We Succeeding? Tracking Regional Benefits...........17 munity groups to develop alternatives, and coordinates grassroots campaigns.Organizational Structure ..............................................19Organizational Development .......................................20Member and Affiliate Groups.......................................21 Contact Information 405 14th Street, Suite 605 Oakland, CA 94612 printed june 2005 510.740.3150 www.transcoalition.org info@transcoalition.org
  3. 3. TALC’S VISIONA century ago, Bay Area communities were By 2030, better planning will allow all Bay Area oriented around downtowns and transit workers to live in the region – rather than endur- corridors. Today, many of the region’s ing grinding long-distance commutes – and willmost desirable places to live – from San Francisco’s protect our remaining open space and farms. As aneighborhoods to Palo Alto and Petaluma – are region, we will be healthier by walking and bicy-communities that were originally planned with cling twice as much as we do now. We will doublepedestrian-friendly streets and flexible designs that our use of transit, ensuring that our highways doaccommodate a diverse mix of homes, shops and not turn into virtual parking lots as is currentlyoffices, parks and open space. predicted. Great public transit and town centers rich with services will ensure that all residentsBut planning and development began to change in can easily reach job centers, schools, health care,the 1950s when the region – like the rest of the na- child care, parks, and grocery stores. This willtion – shifted towards low-density development that restore and maintain mobility for many youth,turned our hillsides and farmland into endless subdi- seniors, persons with disabilities, very low-incomevisions and strip malls. Today, the impacts of poorly- residents, and others who may not have access toplanned growth surround us. We sit in traffic jams a car. The $1.8 billion per year that residents saveon billion-dollar highways while we have less public by reducing their transportation costs can insteadtransit service because of state budget cuts. We see be used for home ownership, higher education,bulldozers carving up the foothills of Mount Diablo. and other purposes. (The specific outcomes weOur youth have lost the opportunity to walk and anticipate, based on models by regional agencies,bike safely and suffer from record levels of asthma. are described on pages 17 and 18.)And we witness widening health and income dis-parities between communities, in part because low- Members of the coalition strongly believe that ifincome families don’t share the same level of access Bay Area residents are effectively engaged in shap-to jobs, education, and health services. ing their communities, then they will create great places to live, work, and play; places that meet ourThe member and affiliate groups of the Transporta- needs and help create a sustainable region for ourtion and Land Use Coalition (TALC) believe that children and grandchildren.these trends do not need to be our destiny. Instead,we envision a Bay Area with vibrant neighborhoods, Fulfilling TALC’s vision will require a fundamentala healthy environment, and a strong economy that shift in public policies and investments, but we be-benefits all communities. We believe that effective lieve that shift has already begun.regional government and engaged residents willsupport development where it makes the most TALC’s Effectivenesssense: in compact, walkable neighborhoods near In 1997, groups from throughout the Bay Areahigh-quality transit. realized that only by working together could theyImproving the way we grow and invest public overcome the powerful forces and institutional in-funds can have substantial benefits for all of us. ertia that prevent effective regional planning. They TALC’S VISION 1
  4. 4. formed the Transportation and Land Use Coalition, Creating a Sustainable Future which has grown to include over 90 environmental, TALC’s 2005-2008 Strategic Plan was developed social justice, and community groups. with our coalition partners over the course of a year. It identifies new opportunities and proposes TALC members work together to analyze county specific goals and objectives on two of our long- and regional policies and investments, and de- standing initiatives: Transportation Equity and velop effective, implementable alternatives. These Community Health (TEACH) and World Class alternatives form the primary recommendations Transportation. in TALC’s highly-regarded reports. For example, the 120-page World Class Transit for the Bay Area, This plan also launches the new Great Communities developed after a year of analysis and consultation Initiative, an unprecedented partnership of leading with coalition members, offers a bold new approach regional nonprofits. This initiative seeks to capital- to fixing our transportation system. The report ize on the window of opportunity that will open as identified $12 billion of projects that can create a the region begins planning for over 100 new transit fast, convenient, and affordable transit system by stations. maximizing the potential of our existing road and rail network. World Class Transit and other TALC These new transit investments, combined with the reports generate headlines, raise public awareness, financial viability of developing near the 305 exist- and lay the groundwork for the coalition’s long- ing stations and transit corridors, offers the Bay Area term initiatives. a unique opportunity to grow smarter. The Great Communities Initiative will provide residents with TALC has won substantial victories by uniting di- tools to engage in planning for neighborhoods near verse constituencies behind policies that promote transit, so that development improves the quality both environmental sustainability and social eq- of life for existing residents while providing great uity, and by coordinating community outreach and places for our children to live. The initiative will strategic media campaigns. From 2000 to 2004, also meet head-on the challenge posed by potential voters in the Bay Area approved 11 transportation displacement of existing residents and prioritize the initiatives that collectively allocate $12 billion, or development of homes that are affordable to people three-quarters of their funding, for public transit of all incomes. expansion and operations. These measures also con- tain over $800 million for other programs initially Working together over the past eight years, TALC proposed in the coalition’s platform, such as safe and its members helped to fundamentally shift transportation for children, incentives to build af- regional transportation priorities – but creating a fordable homes near transit, and funding to connect framework for growth that focuses on long-term low-income communities with jobs and services. sustainability is an even greater challenge. TALC played a central role in developing and build- ing support for a number of these initiatives, includ- To meet it we will need to develop and communicate ing four county sales tax renewals and Regional a vision of great communities as the fundamental Measure 2, the one-dollar bridge toll increase to component of a sustainable region. Of course it will fund public transit. take more than a vision; to overcome long-standing obstacles it will take well-developed strategies that TALC is now recognized nationally as one of the unite instead of divide us and it will require giving most effective regional coalitions working on trans- residents and community leaders the tools to effec- portation and growth issues. The coalition’s success tively engage in local and regional decisions. has garnered awards from the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Senator Barbara Boxer, the We invite you to read on, to contact TALC’s staff National Neighborhood Coalition, and the Cali- and Board of Directors with questions or sug- fornia Association of Nonprofits, among others. gestions, and to join us in our efforts to create a healthy, accessible, environmentally sustainable, and socially just Bay Area.2 TALC’S VISION
  5. 5. Great Communities Initiative P iecemeal and poorly planned who live close to transit stations are five times more growth continues to plague the Bay likely to use transit than others living in the same Area, whether bulldozing farms and city. A recent study showed that by 2025 there will hillsides for tract housing or building large be consumer demand for an additional 550,000 strip malls near transit. Unless we change homes near transit. current growth patterns: over the next 25 years fewer than one in four This demand is being stalled by an array of forces, new homes will be built near such as outdated zoning codes that prohibit tradi- transit; over 200,000 additional tional main streets and state fiscal policies that push residents will have to live outside the cities to chase sales tax revenues instead of provid- region and endure a grinding daily ing homes. Most importantly, few citizens are ac- commute to work here; and lower- tively engaged in planning their communities, and priced housing will tend to be they often oppose new construction that appears to located at the edge of the re- be thrust upon them without providing benefits to gion, far from jobs and in com- the community. munities that require families TALC’s Great Communities Initiative will bring to have a car for every driver. together leading regional organizations to shift Where driving a car is the toward more sustainable and equitable planning only option, people walk for our common future. Only with a major new less, weigh more, and initiative will we be able to provide residents with fare worse on a variety of the tools and information they need to participate health outcomes. effectively in planning their own communities. WeIt doesn’t have to be this way. need to ensure that planning identifies the assets residents value as well as areas where communitiesOver the next five years the Bay Area will have a can be improved. When planning involves strongonce-in-a-generation opportunity to stop poorly community participation and leads to new services,planned growth and make better decisions about such as child care and health care, that directly ben-what, where, and how to build next. Areas within efit neighborhoods, local residents will feel a sensea half-mile radius of transit stations, called station of ownership and support these plans.areas, represent the Bay Area’s best hope to providesafe, affordable homes in walkable neighborhoods. This Great Communities Initiative has two pri- mary efforts:The opportunity is there. In addition to the region’sexisting 300 rapid transit stations and transit corri-  The goal of the Planning Great Communitiesdors, new mass transit investments will add another effort is to vastly increase the quality of com-100 new stations. This infusion of investment will munity participation in planning near stationspur over 75 new community plans and hundreds areas.of new proposed developments in neighborhoods  In Changing the Framework for Growth, TALCnear transit. Living in these neighborhoods, resi- will work with our partners to ensure regionaldents can have easy walking and transit access to and state agencies reward good planning andjobs, child care, shopping, health care, education, prioritize established communities for infra-and the Bay Area’s beautiful open spaces. People structure funding. GREAT COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE 3
  6. 6. GREAT COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE Existing Transit and Planned Expansions4 GREAT COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE
  7. 7. PLANNING GREAT COMMUNITIESB uilding a traditional town – with Coalition Strategies homes, shops, and businesses near  In station area planning processes, alert residents to plans transit – faces a host of obstacles. underway, hold public workshops and training sessions forIn fact, many popular neighborhoods in community groups and local elected officials, and help resi-the Bay Area would be illegal to build dents compare plans to best practices.today because of outdated zoning codes.  Foster local “Friends of the Transit Village” groups to sup-Environmental reviews often focus on local port the vision of high-quality station area plans.traffic but fail to discuss the health or trans-  As individual developments are proposed, provide ana-portation benefits of transit-oriented devel- lytical tools for community groups (such as trip generationopment. Planners are not required to assess models) and criteria for judging individual developments.community needs for childcare or healthfacilities, parks, libraries, or healthy food.  For communities at all stages of the development process,Most importantly, current development develop a “best practices” resource guide, publish a regu-patterns will not meet the growing demand lar newsletter, and track station area development plans tofor homes that all people can afford. regularly update member groups about upcoming meet- ings and events.Desired OutcomeHalf of new homes by 2030 are in walk- Measurable Objectivesable communities near transit and include  Assist residents and groups to influence at least 6 sta- 2006homes affordable to people of all incomes. tion area plans or major individual developments.Opportunities  Complete at least 30 workshops and training sessions, An unprecedented number of new rail and provide technical assistance in more than 25 com- stations and bus rapid transit corridors munities. By 2008 will open over the next 15 years.  Persuade at least 15 cities to adopt model ordinances The Metropolitan Transportation Com- that encourage walkable communities and significant mission plans to fund local station area housing development near transit stations. planning and require the inclusion of  Seventy-five new transit station area plans will have minimum housing levels near transit. been adopted. By 2015 Putting new homes in existing devel-  More than 50% of all new housing approved between oped areas has become more econom- 2010 and 2015 is located within a half-mile walk of ically viable, and growing numbers of frequent transit. retirees, singles, and young couples are seeking walkable communities with better transportation options. Strategic Partners  Greenbelt Alliance  Urban Habitat NELSON-NYGAARD  Non-Profit Housing Association of Northern California  Local Government Commission  Community foundations of the Bay Area Key Allies  Neighborhood associations  Local businesses and Chambers of Commerce Because the city of Campbell reduced the  Faith based groups amount of mandated parking, the developer of  Local environmental and social equity organizations this building was able to put in a restaurant. GREAT COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE 5
  8. 8. CHANGING THE FRAMEWORK FOR GROWTH R egional and state fiscal policies and structures lead – URBANADVANTAGE.COM cities to woo auto dealers and big-box retail stores rather than provide safe and affordable places for people to live. Tight budgets limit cities’ ability to plan for the future and involve all residents in making better decisions about where and how the community will grow. STEVE PRICE Desired Outcome New regional and state policies facilitate rather than hinder smart growth and help achieve the goal that half of all new homes built by 2030 will be near transit. Opportunities Good planning can turn auto-oriented cor-  TALC is urging the Metropolitan Transportation Com- ridors into great places to live and shop. mission (MTC) to require cities to plan for significant housing near future transit stations before MTC funds such projects.  Senator Don Perata, Senator Tom Torlakson (who chairs the Housing and Transportation Committee), and some of the Governor’s appointees support smart growth practices. Coalition Strategies  Lead a regional campaign for MTC, Contra Costa County, and one other county to condition transit sta- tion funding on smart growth principles and to provide dedicated funding for cities to create plans for the areas around transit stations. Ensure that these jurisdictions follow through with vigorous implementation.  Support member groups advocating for state legislation that promotes smart growth and reinvestment in urban areas. Measurable Objectives Strategic Partners  MTC adopts a strong policy to make funding for  Greenbelt Alliance By 2006 new transit projects contingent on plans for walkable communities, with significant numbers of new homes Key Allies developed within a half-mile of transit stations.  Regional environmental and social equity groups  MTC, Contra Costa County, and at least one other county successfully implement policies to condition  Labor unions transit funding on planning for enough places for  Business groups By 2008 people to live.  State and regional sources provide sustained funding for planning for the areas around transit stations.  Transit station areas become centers for new homes in the Bay Area, providing 300,000 new places for people By 2015 of all income levels to live. New health care, senior, and youth facilities, branch libraries, and other services transform these areas into community focal points.6 GREAT COMMUNITIES INITIATIVE
  9. 9. World Class TransportationInitiative T ALC’s seminal report, World Class Transit for the Bay Area, offers a vision and bold approach for fix- ing our regional transportation system. It identifies ways to vastly improve the use of our existing transporta- tion infrastructure, including nearly 18,000 miles of roads and 600 miles of train tracks, with cost-effective projects that would provide faster, more convenient, and more af- fordable transit service. Since World Class Transit for the Bay Area was published in January 2000, TALC has led several broad-based efforts to fund the projects detailed in it. Voters throughout the Bay Area have supported many of these projects by approving transportation sales tax measures and a bridge toll increase that will raise over $12 billion for public transit and $500 million for bicycle and pedestrian safety. The recession and state budget crisis, however, have left many projects under-funded. TALC’s World Class Transportation Initiative contin- ues, updates, and expands on TALC’s previous proposals, with a focus on five objectives:  Revitalize basic transit service in existing urban and suburban areas in the region’s core.  Help develop a plan to expand and integrate the region- al rail system and secure full funding for key regional projects.  Obtain full funding for regional bicycle and pedestrian safety projects.  Develop new, equitable and stable revenue sources to fund these programs.  Increase the percentage of walking, bicycling, transit, and carpooling trips through a “one-on-one” personal- ized marketing program. WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION INITIATIVE 7
  10. 10. REVITALIZING URBAN TRANSIT CAMPAIGN C uts in state and federal funding, – PUBLIC VISION RESEARCH combined with volatile revenues from local sales taxes, have led Bay Area transit agencies to raise fares, reduce service, and cut back on mainte- nance. These changes have hurt ridership, DAVID VASQUEZ which depresses farebox revenues even further, and contributes to even deeper cuts in service. Desired Outcomes A photo simulation of the proposed San Francisco Bus Rapid Tran-  Ridership is doubled on the Bay Area’s sit line on Van Ness Avenue. bus and light rail systems between 2005 and 2030.  Break the cycle of fare hikes and ser-  Help local communities learn about and get involved in vice cuts caused by transit agencies’ the planning processes for Bus Rapid Transit and other budgetary shortfalls, which dispro- bus improvement projects. portionately hurt low-income riders. Measurable Objectives Opportunities  AC Transit’s BRT project has gained sufficient com-  Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) – using munity support and funding to proceed with the first By 2006 proven new technologies and dedi- phase of implementation. cated lanes where feasible – has the  The NightBART and TransLink programs are fully potential to greatly improve bus ser- operational. vice and attract new riders, but pilot  Stable funding for transit operations allows the agen- projects remain under-funded. cies to restore and expand core service.  Three BRT projects are in the plan-  First stage of the Oakland/Berkeley/San Leandro BRT ning stages: two in San Francisco project is opened. (Geary Boulevard and Van Ness Av- By 2008  TALC and member groups, working with transit agen- enue), and one that runs through cies, prioritize which BRT and other bus improvement Oakland, Berkeley, and San Leandro projects should be built first. (along Telegraph Avenue/Interna- tional Boulevard/East 14th).  BRT lines with dedicated bus lanes are opened on at By 2015  Regional Measure 2 (RM2) funded least three of TALC’s prioritized routes. two innovative transit projects: all-  Funding is secured for all BRT projects recommended night bus service along BART routes in TALC’s updated plan. (NightBART) and the TransLink uni- versal transit fare “smart card,” which will make it easier for passengers to Strategic Partners ride and transfer between several Bay  TransitWorks Area transit systems.  Transportation Justice Working Group Coalition Strategies  Lead and support regional and lo- Key Allies cal efforts to secure stable operating  San Francisco advocacy groups: Transportation for funds for transit agencies and mini- a Livable City and Rescue MUNI mize service cuts and fare hikes.8 WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION INITIATIVE
  11. 11. REGIONAL RAIL CAMPAIGNT he Bay Area has a fragmented – CALTRAIN passenger rail network, with poor connections between systems and CHUCK FOXlittle agency interest in cooperation. Fur-thermore, past extensions have often beenchosen based on political popularity in-stead of careful and objective planning toserve the most riders at the lowest cost.Desired Outcomes An integrated rail transit network Expanding commuter rail service on existing freight lines offers a throughout the Bay Area provides 1.4 cost-effective way to broaden train service. million daily trips by 2030: double today’s ridership levels. An effective high-speed rail connec- tion links the Bay Area directly with Southern California and Sacramento.Opportunities Many rail expansion projects were  Work with local groups to determine and advocate for the partially funded by recent transporta- most cost-effective transit links between Fremont and San tion measures. Jose. The Bay Area Regional Rail Plan study, aimed at improving the inte- Measurable Objectives  The Regional Rail Plan study considers all of the strat- 2006 gration of our rail systems and funded by the recent bridge toll increase, will egies set forth in World Class Transit. help to: expand and integrate existing  The recommendations in the Regional Rail Plan are train service; integrate rail with bus based on comprehensive analysis – not polls or politi- and ferry systems; and connect high- cal influence. The study gains TALC’s support by iden- speed rail to Bay Area transit. By 2008 tifying cost-effective measures to expand rail service.  The new Transbay Terminal, SMART, and other prior-Coalition Strategies ity projects are fully funded. Co-lead a regional campaign to se-  High-speed rail service terminates at the new Transbay By 2015 cure full funding for the extension of Caltrain to a new Transbay Terminal, Terminal in downtown San Francisco, and integrates the Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit with a seamless regional transit network. (SMART) commuter project, and other rail priorities in TALC’s World Strategic Partners Class Transit proposal.  BayRail Alliance Foster effective public participation in the Bay Area Regional Rail Plan Key Allies study, and alert member groups to  Rail advocates meetings and key milestones.  Business organizations Advocate for TALC’s World Class  Social equity groups Transit vision of significantly upgrad- ed and expanded commuter rail ser-  Environmental organizations vice utilizing existing freight tracks. WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION INITIATIVE 9
  12. 12. SAFE ROUTES TO SCHOOLS AND TRANSIT CAMPAIGN O ur streets have been designed dan burden – pedbikeimages.org for fast cars at the expense of the safety of pedestrians and bicy- clists. In 2001 and 2002, 21% of auto-re- lated fatalities involved bicyclists and pe- destrians, yet only 4.8% of federal safety funding for California benefited bicyclists and pedestrians. Unsafe street conditions TALC and the Bay Area Bicycle Coalition will campaign to make mean that fewer people choose to bicycle it safe for our children to walk and bike to school. or walk. Reduced levels of physical activ- ity lead to higher rates of obesity and Coalition Strategies other physical ailments. Unsafe streets,  Oversee implementation of the new $20 million Safe especially near key destinations like tran- Routes to Transit (SR2T) program, which TALC spon- sit hubs, schools, and shopping centers, sored as part of Regional Measure 2. result in more car trips – further adding to  Help develop proposals for an effective regional Safe stressful traffic congestion and unhealthy Routes to Schools (SR2S) program. environmental pollution.  Co-lead regional advocacy efforts to obtain full funding for bicycle and pedestrian programs. Desired Outcome Bicycling and walking are so safe and  Co-lead efforts to fund a bicycle/pedestrian/maintenance convenient, and the health benefits so path on the western span of the San Francisco-Oakland widely understood, that the share of trips Bay Bridge that connects with the path planned for the by these two modes doubles from 11% to new eastern span. 22% by 2020. Measurable Objectives Opportunities  The regional SR2T program has been designed and By 2006  Scientific evidence of the tremendous initial funding is allocated. health benefits of regular physical ac-  New legislation gives MTC the flexibility to fund the tivity is growing. Bay Bridge western span pathway.  The nine Bay Area counties and the  Funding for the regional bicycle and pedestrian pro- Metropolitan Transportation Com- gram increases by 150% to $500 million. mission (MTC) each have partially By 2008  The western span pathway on the Bay Bridge is fully funded bicycle plans, and some cities funded. are creating pedestrian plans.  The regional SR2S program has been initiated.  The Marin Safe Routes to Schools program is already a great model for  Regional and county bicycle and pedestrian plans are By 2015 the Bay Area and the nation: after the fully funded. first two years of the pilot program  Over 6,000 people are walking or bicycling on the Bay (2000-2002), the number of children Bridge every day. walking and bicycling to participating public schools increased from 21% to Strategic Partners 38%. During the 2003-2004 school  Bay Area Bicycle Coalition (BABC) year, the percentage of children ar- riving in single occupancy vehicles Key Allies decreased from 55% to only 42%.  Local bicycle and pedestrian advocacy organizations  Senior, youth, and public health groups  Local businesses organizations10 WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION INITIATIVE
  13. 13. FUNDING WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION CAMPAIGNA t least $10 billion must be raised over the next 25 – PUBLIC VISION RESEARCH years to maintain our existing transit system and fund some strategic, cost-effective expansions. Continuingstate and federal budget deficits, plus the volatility of localsales tax revenues, dictate that the Bay Area needs to raise ad-ditional revenues on its own and in new ways. DAVID VASQUEZDesired OutcomeNew regional revenue sources, which are more stable andequitable than sales and property taxes, provide sufficient LANE COUNTY TRANSIT DISTRICTfunding to implement TALC’s proposals.Opportunities The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) has the authority to place a regional gas tax on the bal- lot and is pursuing legislation to instead place a gasoline “user fee” before voters that would only require a simple majority instead of a two-thirds vote. TALC will lead efforts to raise new revenues Other potential funding sources include reinstating a por- for Caltrain (top), Bus Rapid Transit (bot- tion of the vehicle license fee (VLF) that was cut in 2003, tom), basic transit operating expenses, and and sales tax proposals in Napa and Solano counties. other Coalition priorities.Coalition Strategies Create a coalition-based proposal for allocating a regional gasoline user fee, and work with MTC to obtain approval by the Legislature. If the effort to create a user fee fails, advocate for TALC’s transportation funding priorities to be included in any new revenue sources, as well as the 2008 Regional Trans- portation Plan.Measurable Objectives Strategic Partners  State legislation changing the gas tax to a user fee  All coalition member groups2006 passes. Key Allies  Voters approve new regional transportation funding.By 2008  Business groups  At least $3 billion in new spending is allocated to transportation projects recommended by TALC.  Labor groups  TALC has helped to secure at least $5 billion of newBy 2015 revenue for World Class Transportation projects and programs in the Bay Area. WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION INITIATIVE 11
  14. 14. PROMOTING HEALTHY, SUSTAINABLE TRAVEL CAMPAIGN M ost people continue to use automobiles for every – TALC trip, whether they go five blocks for a quart of milk or ten miles to work. Mass marketing efforts JOSH APTE to increase transit use, walking, bicycling, and carpooling have only been modestly effective and many of these focus solely on trips to work. Personalized marketing programs, which use a one-to-one approach to teach people how to use travel alternatives, are now operating successfully in England, Australia, and Portland, Oregon. They have consistently in- creased transit use by 20% and walking and bicycling up to 100%. These programs are successful because they identify TALC wants to undertake a personalized people interested in alternatives to driving, and provide them marketing effort to get more people walking, with information about travel options to any destination. biking, using transit, and other alternatives to driving alone. Desired Outcomes  Region-wide implementation of personalized transit mar- keting programs reaches 60% of the Bay Area’s popula- tion by 2015.  Those receiving personalized transit marketing increase their walking, bicycling, and transit use by at least 20% and reduce their solo driving trips by at least 10%. Opportunities  Transit agencies are eager to fill their vehicles to bolster revenues, and thereby avoid having to cut service.  Many new transit services will begin over the next four years, creating a particularly opportune time to have fo- cused marketing to potential customers. Coalition Strategies Strategic Partners TALC will bring agencies together to initiate a pilot mar-  AC Transit keting program in the East Bay, then urge other agencies to  BART adopt similar programs across the region.  Alameda County Congestion Measurable Objectives Management Agency  Personalized transportation marketing pilot project 2006 receives funding. Key Allies  Schools and universities  First pilot marketing project is completed. By 2008  Community organizations  Other programs are started to spread personalized mar- keting throughout the region.  Personalized transit marketing is offered to 60% of the 2015 Bay Area’s population.12 WORLD CLASS TRANSPORTATION INITIATIVE
  15. 15. Transportation Equity andCommunity Health (TEACH)Initiative J obs out of reach, missed health care appointments, and students unable to get to classes or after-school activities are all problems with a common cause: trans- portation barriers. Throughout the Bay Area, hundreds of thousands of residents live in households where there is no access to a car; over one million others in the region share one car among several adults. Low-income family members are most in need of increased transportation choices. For them, public transit, walking and bicycling are critical lifelines. But transportation funding has too often focused on relieving congestion for rush-hour auto commuters, at the expense of providing basic mobility for those who depend primarily on transit. The fundamental goal of the transportation equity move- ment is to ensure that transportation is no longer an obstacle to self-sufficiency and a better life. TALC’s Transportation Equity and Community Health (TEACH) Initiative consists of three key efforts to win transportation justice:  The Lifeline Transportation campaign will advocate for dependable access to jobs, services, and educational op- portunities for residents of low-income communities.  The Access to Health campaign will continue TALC’s pilot project to improve transportation access to health care facilities for low-income residents of Contra Costa County and replicate it in other counties.  A Training and Technical Assistance program will help local community organizations advocate more ef- fectively for local and regional transporta- tion solutions. TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH INITIATIVE 13
  16. 16. LIFELINE TRANSPORTATION CAMPAIGN T he Metropolitan Transporta- – TALC tion Commission’s (MTC) 2001 report, Lifeline Transportation JOSH APTE Network, identified key gaps in transit ser- vice that keep low-income families from reaching jobs, schools, child care facilities, and fresh-food markets. Providing a trans- portation “lifeline” by filling in these gaps with new transit service would cost an ad- ditional $100 million per year. In addition Many low-income families depend on public transit service to ac- to this new transit service, these communi- cess educational and employment opportunities. ties also need bus shelters, discount passes, child care shuttles, and related services. Desired Outcome Measurable Objectives Low-income families have access to  Assist at least seven community groups that are partici- many more jobs and essential services. pating in CBTPs. By 2006 By 2025, these families will be able to  Convince MTC, county congestion management reach 80% more jobs with a 30-minute agencies, and transit agencies to develop more accurate transit trip. costs of the Lifeline Transportation Network. Opportunities  Assist community groups that are participating in 20  MTC recently committed $9 million different CBTPs. per year to lifeline transportation pro-  Through new funding sources, or by shifting existing By 2008 grams, and admits that more invest- funding, MTC and other agencies devote an addi- ment is needed to achieve transporta- tional $20 million per year to lifeline transportation tion equity. services.  MTC has committed to completing  Transportation agencies commit $50 million per year By 2015 Community-Based Transportation to lifeline transportation services. Plans (CBTPs) in 25 low-income  Key recommendations of the original CBTPs are neighborhoods. implemented.  Through the Transportation Justice Working Group (TJWG), social justice groups are becoming more organized and have identified lifeline transporta- tion as a high priority. Coalition Strategies Strategic Partners  TALC will continue to facilitate TJWG  Transportation Justice Working Group members efforts to advocate for better analysis of  Urban Habitat transportation needs and additional lifeline transportation funding. Key Allies  In communities conducting CBTPs,  TransitWorks TALC will organize training sessions to  Community groups in CBTP neighborhoods help local groups participate effectively  Immigrant, social service, and health groups in the process, ensure that the plans re- flect neighborhood needs, and advocate for these solutions to be implemented.14 TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH INITIATIVE
  17. 17. ACCESS TO HEALTH CAMPAIGNF or many low-income residents Opportunities without cars, poor pedestrian and  TALC’s Access to Health pilot project in Contra Costa transit access to health care facili- County is bringing together local residents, health careties can lead to missed medical appoint- providers, and transit officials, to both improve transpor-ments, and many individuals simply stop tation access to medical care and locate future health carescheduling appointments for treatment facilities in currently underserved neighborhoods.of chronic illnesses. In 2002, TALC and  TALC’s mapping and analysis work for Roadblocks totwo social justice groups released Road- Health created new tools for defining and measuring ac-blocks to Health, a groundbreaking study cess to medical facilities.of transit access to medical facilities in 15low-income communities. Of the three Coalition Strategiescounties studied, the worst situation  Coordinate meetings in three low-income communitieswas in Contra Costa County, where only so that community leaders, health care providers and33% of residents had convenient transit transit officials can design and implement improved ac-or pedestrian access to a health clinic. cess to health care.Desired Outcomes  Offer leadership development, training, and advocacy By 2015, 65% of the low-income support to at least 25 community and health care leaders, residents of Contra Costa County to help them better understand and influence local trans- will have convenient access to portation decisions. health care – 150,000 more people than today. Measurable Objectives  Initiate or expand at least five programs to improve TALC’s work in Contra Costa access to health care facilities in targeted Contra Costa County will serve as a model for the County communities. improved coordination of transpor- By 2006 tation and health services through-  Health care and transportation agencies in Contra out the Bay Area. Costa County institutionalize coordinated planning for health care access.  Initiate Access to Health efforts in at least one other TALC Bay Area county. By 2008  Three or more projects similar to Access to Health are begun in California, based on TALC’s success in Con- tra Costa County.  Good pedestrian and transit access to health care facili- By 2015 ties is regularly considered as an important objective in siting medical facilities and in planning transit service. Key Allies  Local health providers Pedestrian and transit access to health ser-  Community groups vices is limited, or non-existent, in suburban  Contra Costa County Health Services counties. TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH INITIATIVE 15
  18. 18. TRAINING SESSIONS AND CAPACITY BUILDING N early $4 billion per year is spent TALC on Bay Area transportation, but complex decision-making processes, dozens of transportation agen- cies, and long project lead times deter community involvement in transporta- tion decisions. By providing easy-to-use materials and training sessions tailored to a group’s needs, TALC will help low- TALC trainings help give community groups a stronger voice in income and people-of-color communities transportation decisions. break through these barriers. Desired Outcomes Measurable Objectives  Low-income communities win in-  Provide at least 40 community groups with training vestments that improve local transit sessions and technical assistance. access, economic equity, and commu-  Work with the Association of Community Organi- nity health. zations for Reform Now (ACORN) and other local  Through these victories, histori- groups to help identify community transportation By 2006 cally disadvantaged communities gain needs and support efforts to meet those key needs eq- greater political power and capacity to uitably; help groups in at least five communities to win influence transportation and land use transportation improvements. decisions.  Provide at least 60 community groups with training sessions and technical assistance, including at least one Opportunities in every neighborhood where a CBTP is undertaken.  Most low-income communities in the  TransitWorks and other new collaboratives become a Bay Area will complete Community- strong voice for sustainable regional transportation. Based Transportation Plans (CBTPs) By 2008  At least 15 underserved CBTP communities achieve by 2006, identifying priorities for lo- specific, needed, and locally requested transportation cal action in the process. improvements.  TransitWorks, the collaboration of Bay Area transit unions advocating  Social justice groups wield increasing influence over By 2015 for transportation improvements, regional and statewide advocacy and transportation demonstrates how local groups can planning efforts, and their representatives sit on many join forces and work effectively for transportation agency boards. social and economic justice. Coalition Strategies Strategic Partners  Distribute TALC’s Access Now! guide  Urban Habitat and ACORN and tools, and conduct training sessions  TransitWorks and other technical assistance, to help community groups have greater influ- Key Allies ence over transportation decisions.  Local community groups throughout the region  Develop intensive campaign partner- ships with local social justice groups, and foster collaborative efforts (such as TransitWorks) among underrepre- sented populations (such as youth, seniors, and immigrants).16 TRANSPORTATION EQUITY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH INITIATIVE
  19. 19. ARE WE SUCCEEDING? TRACKING REGIONAL BENEFITS T he policies and decisions that deter- mine how the Bay Area grows will have a dramatic impact on environmental quality, public health, economic competitiveness, and, of course, access to opportunities for all residents. TALC has developed projections for the likely benefits of reaching the objectives outlined in this Strategic Plan, based on alternative growth sce- narios modeled by the Metropolitan Trans- portation Commission and other regional agencies. As indicated on the chart on the following page, some of the beneficial outcomes, such as cutting bicycle and pedestrian injuries by 50%, are di- rectly attributable to meeting some of the campaign objectives (e.g., fully funding bicycle and pedestrian plans. The predicted cumulative benefits of reaching all of the objectives, such as the reduction of 8,000,000 miles per day in driving on Bay Area roads, are noted on the bottom row. TALC has developed a process for tracking or estimating the 2005 Strategic Plan’s measurable ob- jectives, projected benefits, and long-term desired outcomes, and will include updates in our annual report to TALC’s member groups and supporters. Some campaign outcomes and regional benefits will be tracked using data that is released annually, while other data is available less frequently, (e.g., the triennial transportation plans). Unfortunately, there is no method in place for tracking a few objectives, such as quantifying the amount of housing devel- oped within a half-mile of transit stations. In these instances, we are working with regional agencies and other partners to develop a method for tracking or estimating progress. Tracking progress toward our objectives is criti- cal for knowing when we have succeeded, when we are failing to meet our goals, and when we must reevaluate our strategies. To find out more about the methods used for determining and measuring progress toward particular objectives, refer to the Strategic Plan section of the website or contact TALC staff. REGIONAL BENEFITS 17
  20. 20. 18 REGIONAL BENEFITS CHART Great Communities World Class Transportation Equity andREGIONAL BENEFITS Initiative Transportation Initiative Community Health Initiative  Regional policies support housing near  $50 million per year spent on lifeline trans-  Core bus and rail systems stabilized, expanded. transit stations. Significant funding dedi- portation services. Measurable  Regional pedestrian and bike programs fully funded. cated to create community plans.  Pedestrian and transit access to clinics is an Objectives  Personalized transit marketing offered to 60% of  Extensive smart growth training given to important objective in siting medical facilities the Bay Area’s population. elected officials and community groups. and in transit planning.  By 2025, sufficient housing allows all  150,000 low-income Contra Costa residents  Double transit use in the Bay Area to 2.4 million new Bay Area workers to find homes in (65%) have transit or walking access to health Desired daily trips by 2030. the region. care by 2015. Outcomes  5.9 million daily trips on foot and by bicycle  By 2020, sufficient new housing allows all Bay  Low-income families can reach over 80% more – 21% of all trips. Area workers to find housing in the region. jobs within a 30 minute transit trip. Environmental Preservation Strong, Equitable Economy Healthy Communities  Better transit access to jobs and more housing op-  Reduced transportation problems result in 75%  Over 110,000 acres of existing open space Benefits of tions for employees allow the Bay Area to remain fewer missed medical appointments in targeted saved from being bulldozed for development. Achieving economically competitive. low-income communities.  Less sprawl saves the region 18 billion gal- Outcomes  Deaths and injuries from pedestrian and bicycle collisions  Asthma hospitalizations are cut in half, due to lons of water yearly by 2020. with cars are cut 50% by 2030, saving $140 million. cleaner air. Cumulative  8 million fewer miles of driving per day  Bay Area residents save over $1.8 billion in annual  Increased physical activity cuts annual health care Impact of improves air quality, cuts greenhouse gas transportation costs – $600 per family. costs by $350 million and obesity cases by 15,000. Meeting emissions by 400,000 pounds daily, and  By 2030, twice as many jobs as today, 240,000, are  Significant health improvements from cleaner air All Objectives reduces dependence on foreign oil. within a 45-minute transit ride. and reduced particulate emissions.
  21. 21. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURETALC Members and Boards program, and organizational issues. The Board’s 12TALC is a coalition of Member and Affiliate members are elected by the Member Group Rep-Groups, as well as numerous individual activists. resentatives to three-year terms, staggered so thatOur long-term success is predicated on uniting one-third of the Board is up for election every year.environmental, social justice, and key community Votes on major policy decisions require a three-groups behind common policies and campaigns. quarters majority.Member Groups endorse TALC’s platform, payannual dues, actively participate in campaigns, and TALC Staffdetermine TALC’s policies and leadership. Only TALC staff have a rich background in transporta-Member Group representatives are eligible to serve tion and land use policy, community organizing,on and vote for the Board of Directors. media and communication. TALC staff coordinate coalition meetings, working groups, and provideAffiliate Groups are organizations that support leadership on research and campaigns. The specificTALC’s mission but are generally less involved. Af- positions that are currently staffed are shown infiliates do not pay dues and do not vote for or serve bold on the organizational chart below. The posi-on the Board of Directors. tions that are not in bold represent the additional staff positions that the TALC Board of DirectorsWe hold bimonthly regional meetings in San Fran- believes are necessary to implement the Strategiccisco, open for all to attend. Working groups bring Plan. The 2005-2008 Strategic Plan also envisionstogether advocates to develop specific policy recom- initiation of a TALC Advisory Board in 2005.mendations. TALC also convenes working groups towork on county issues when there is a critical need. Stuart Cohen is TALC’s co-founder and Executive Director. He has helped lead a number of TALC’sBoard of Directors policy initiatives, including the recent success inTALC is governed by a Board of Directors, made up developing a one-dollar bridge toll increase to fundof representatives of Member Groups. The Board is public transit, which was approved by Bay Areaultimately responsible for leading TALC on policy, voters in 2004. Member Board of Advisory elect Groups Directors Board Executive DirectorCommunications Promoting Healthy Director of Policy South Bay World Class& Development Sustainable Travel Administration Director Organizer Transit Program Coordinator Director TEACH Access to Planning Great World Class Existing Program Health Communities Transit Positions Coordinator Coordinator Program Coordinator Organizer Proposed Planning Great Positions Communities Organizer ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE 19
  22. 22. ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT T ALC’s Board of Directors has adopted ing individual support so that it accounts for 12% a development plan to support program of funding by 2008. expansion and the realization of the 2005- 2008 Strategic Plan. For the past eight years, TALC Fee-for-service: TALC staff have significant and has relied primarily on foundations and other insti- often unique policy and organizing experience. tutional support. As can be seen in the charts below, Increasingly, other nonprofits, transit agencies and in 2004 87% of TALC’s funding was institutional consultants have sought our services. In 2004 this support, of which 75% came from foundations and accounted for about 10% of TALC’s total revenue, 12% from government grants. with projects that included leading community pro- cesses to prioritize bicycle and pedestrian safety proj- The development plan will guide implementation of ects in a low-income community of East San Jose, new fund-raising approaches to diversify TALC’s rev- and leading the grassroots advocacy effort to pass Re- enue base. The new areas of emphasis will include: gional Measure 2 (the bridge toll increase for public transit). The goal for 2008 is to have fee-for-service Individual supporters and major donors: TALC work account for about 17% of TALC revenues. has never had a sustained individual supporter pro- gram. In 2004, $7,000 was raised from individu- Events: TALC’s primary event at this point is our als. In March 2005, TALC asked some of its core annual summit. But as our membership base con- supporters to make donations to help launch the tinues to grow, it is likely that we will start having 2005-2008 Strategic Plan and $13,000 was quickly at least one or two events per year that have a strong raised. The development plan has a goal of increas- fund-raising component. 2004: 2008: Actual Revenue Sources – $415, 000 Proposed Revenue Sources – $715, 000 2% Individuals and Member Groups 12% Individuals and Member Groups 10% Fee for Service 17% Fee for Service 1% Events/Other 3% Events/Other 87% 68% Foundations and Foundations and Government Grants Government Grants20 ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT
  23. 23. MEMBER AND AFFILIATE GROUPSMember Groups are indicated by an asterisk (*), other groups are Affiliates.Regional and BayRail Alliance* Hayward Area Planning AssociationNational Groups Buspool.org Hayward Demos Democratic Club*Bay Area Bicycle Coalition* Campus Community Association* HOMES (Housing OpportunitiesBayPeds* Cities21.org Make Economic Sense)Bluewater Network Community Homeless Alliance Improve Alternative TransportationCenter for Third World Organizing Ministry (IAT) Berkeley*City CarShare Council of Churches of Santa Clara Pat Piras ConsultingCommunity Design and County Richmond Improvement Architecture Downtown Residents Association of Association*Congress for the New Urbanism San Jose Rockridge Community PlanningEnvironmental Defense* East Palo Alto Historical & CouncilGreenbelt Alliance* Agricultural Society San Pablo Avenue Rail CoalitionInternational Council for Local Peninsula Bicycle & Pedestrian Studio L’Image Environmental Initiatives Coalition* The People on the Bus*Latino Issues Forum Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition* Transit Plaza*League of Women Voters of the Bay Sustainable San Mateo County* United Seniors of Oakland & Area* Urban Planning Coalition, San Jose Alameda CountyLIFETIME: Low Income Families’ State University Urban Creeks Council Empowerment Through Walk San Jose* Wellstone Democratic Renewal Education* Working Partnerships USA Club*National Trust for Historic Preservation East Bay San FranciscoNon-Profit Housing Association of Alameda County Central Labor Gray Panthers - San Francisco Northern California* Council - AFL-CIO* Hayes Valley NeighborhoodPlanning and Conservation League* Alameda Transit Advocates Association*Rail Passengers Association of Albany/El Cerrito Access* Mission Housing Development California* Alliance for an Open City CorporationRails-to-Trails Conservancy* Government Rescue MUNIRedefining Progress* Amalgamated Transit Union, Local San Francisco Bicycle CoalitionRegional Alliance for Transit (RAFT) 192* San Francisco Green Party*Save the Bay Building Opportunities for Self- San Francisco Housing ActionSEIU 790* Sufficiency CoalitionSierra Club* Citizens for Alternative San Francisco Planning and Urban Transportation Solutions Research (SPUR)*Surface Transportation Policy Project* Coalition for West Oakland San Francisco Tomorrow Revitalization Synergy Business SolutionsThe Next Generation* Contra Costa Central Labor Tenderloin NeighborhoodTrain Riders Association of Council, AFL-CIO* Development Corporation California* East Bay Asian Local Development Transportation for a Livable City*TRANSDEF* Corporation Urban SolutionsUnion of Concerned Scientists East Bay Bicycle Coalition* Walk San FranciscoUrban Ecology* Ecocity BuildersUrban Habitat* Environmental Science Institute North BayWorld Institute on Disability Friends of Alhambra Creek Fisher & Hall, Urban Design Friends of the Albany Ferry Marin Center for IndependentSouth Bay Gray Panthers of BerkeleyActerra Living* Gray Panthers - Southern Alameda Marin County Bicycle Coalition*Affordable Housing Network of County Sonoma County Transportation Santa Clara County* Gray Panthers - West Contra Costa Land Use Coalition*Amalgamated Transit Union, Local 265* Green Party of Alameda County* MEMBER AND AFFILIATE GROUPS 21
  24. 24. Transportation and Land Use Coalition 405 14th Street, Suite 605 Oakland, CA 94612 510.740.3150 www.transcoalition.org Acknowledgements This Strategic Plan was developed with our coalition partners overthe course of the year in order to address some of the region’s tough- est challenges. Tremendous thanks to the many coalition members who volunteered their time in workgroups and meetings. Particular thanks are given to the two members of TALC’s Board of Directorswho led the strategic planning process: Margaret Okuzumi and Dick Schneider. David Schechter and Brian Stanke, two strategic plan- ning assistants, did invaluable work in collecting data, organizing workgroups, and focusing the plan. Seth Schneider did the layout and design. Editing and proofreading assistance was provided by John Spangler, Linda Hudson Writing, and Dalya Massachi.

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