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Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)
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Ch. 15 PART 2 (8th Ed) Ch. 17 (7th Ed)

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  • 1. Chapter 15
  • 2.  Social unrest and violence  Genocide in Bosnia, Rwanda, and the Sudan  Torture of prisoners  Presidential scandals  Middle Eastern violence and instability ▪ September 11, 2001, attacks ▪ Saddam Hussein deposed from power ▪ Continued conflict between the Israelis and Palestinians ▪ Barack Obama, first African-American President © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2
  • 3.  Asian American Theatre  In the 19th and first half of the 20th century, Asians appeared in drama as stereotypes  Asian-focused theatre groups formed in the latter half of the 20th century © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 3
  • 4.  Asian American Theatre continued  These groups fostered a more accurate Asian-American identity on stage ▪ East West Players, Los Angeles (1965) ▪ Asian Exclusion Act, Seattle (1973) ▪ Asian-American Theatre Workshop, San Francisco (1973) ▪ Ma-Yi Theatre Company, New York (1989) ▪ Mu Performing Arts, Minneapolis (1992) ▪ David Henry Hwang, ‘M. Butterfly” © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 4
  • 5.  Latino-Latina Theatre  Can be divided into three categories: ▪ Chicano Theater ▪ Cuban American Theater ▪ Puerto Rican or Nuyorican Theater  All three address experience of Hispanics living in U.S.  Sometimes written in Spanish but are usually in English or a combo of both © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 5
  • 6.  Latino-Latina Theatre  Chicano theatre ▪ Originated primarily in the west and southwest ▪ Came to prominence during the 1960s civil rights movement ▪ Luis Valdéz (1940– ) and the El Teatro Campesino (“farmworkers’ theatre”) ▪ Zoot Suit (1978) ▪ Roosters (1987) by Milcha Sanchez-Scott (1955– © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. ) 6
  • 7.  Latino-Latina Theatre continued  Cuban American theatre ▪ The Federal Theater Project resulted in 14 Cuban American plays from 1936-37 ▪ Developed chiefly in Florida ▪ Maria Irene Fornes (1930– ) “Mud,” “Fefu and Her Friends” ▪ Nilo Cruz (1960– ), won Pulitzer Prize in 2003 for “Anna in the Tropics” © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 7
  • 8.  Latino-Latina Theatre continued  Puerto Rican or Nuyorican theatre ▪ Nuyorican refers to Puerto Rican culture, primarily in New York but elsewhere as well ▪ Playwrights with a Puerto Rican background began to be produced in the 1960s and 1970s by groups like:  Teatro Repertorio Español  The Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre  New York Public Theatre  The Nuyorican Poets’ Café – produced many Hispanice playwrights including Miguel Pinero ("Short Eyes") © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 8
  • 9.  Native American Theatre  No theatre tradition as we know it  Instead, theatrical elements were found in ancient rituals and communal celebrations  Many native ceremonies outlawed by the American government in the 19th century  Forced to go “underground”  Companies identify with their nations, not under the generic term “Native American” © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 9
  • 10.  Native American Theatre continued  American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1972  Two groups that led the way: ▪ The Native American Theater Ensemble ▪ Spiderwoman (also feminist). Began in 1975 and longest running women’s and Native American theater group  Native American theatre groups ▪ Thunderbird Theatre, Lawrence, Kansas (1974) ▪ Red Earth Performing Arts, Seattle (1974) ▪ Tulsa Indian Actor’s Workshop, Tulsa (1993) © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 10
  • 11.  Feminist Theatre and Gender Diversity  Feminist theatre companies have encouraged audiences to reexamine their own gender biases ▪ Companies include: ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ At the Foot of the Mountain, Women’s Experimental Theatre Omaha Magic Theatre Split Britches  Feminist influences are felt in both Native American and lesbian theatre © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 11
  • 12.  Feminist Theatre and Gender Diversity  Some significant contemporary feminist playwrights: ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ ▪ Maria Irene Fornes Paula Vogel Marsha Norman Wendy Wasserstein Beth Henley Suzan Lori-Parks © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 12
  • 13.  Gay and Lesbian Theatre  Gay and lesbian theatre is a distinct movement  Themes existed in theatre before the 1960s ▪ Men in drag in 19th century and early part of 20th century, raising questions about sexual and gender roles ▪ Lillian Hellman’s “The Children’s Hour” (1934)  First play that brought gay life to the forefront was The Boys in the Band (1968) © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 13
  • 14.  Gay and Lesbian Theatre continued  Stonewall Inn riot considered the beginning of the modern gay rights movement  Gay characters, now more than ever, are presented unapologetically © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 14
  • 15. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 15
  • 16.  Today’s theatre art is complex  Mirrors the changes in our global society  Performance Art – Experimental theater that initially incorporated elements of dance and visual arts. Since performance art is often based on the vision of an individual performer or director rather than a playwright, the autobiographical monologue has become a popular performance art form. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 16
  • 17.  Today’s theatre art is complex  Mirrors the changes in our global society  Performance Art  Antecedents: ▪ Earlier avant-garde experiments of the 20th century ▪ The theories of Antonin Artaud and Jerzy Grotowski © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 17
  • 18.  Performance Art continued  Early manifestations: ▪ Related to painting and to dance ▪ Story, character, and text were minimized or eliminated  Present form: ▪ Individual artists who present autobiographical material onstage ▪ Some artists’ work challenges the status quo  Many are performed off-off-Broadway © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 18
  • 19.  Performance Art continued  Performed in conventional spaces as well as non-conventional spaces like warehouses, museums, etc.  Some significant performance artists: ▪ Karen Finley (controversy surrounding National Endowment for the Arts grant) ▪ Spalding Gray ▪ Robbie McCauley (“Alice’s Rape”) ▪ Anna Deavere Smith (“Twilight LA”) © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 19
  • 20.  Postmodernism – A contemporary concept suggesting that artists and audiences have gone beyond the modernist movements of realism and the various departures of realism, to combine them both into one unique form. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 20
  • 21.  Postmodernism  Characteristics: ▪ Reflects issues of power in art ▪ Rebels against traditional readings of texts ▪ Mix of abstraction and realism, techniques and styles ▪ Mix of popular concerns with those of “high” art  Deconstruction  Non-text based  Wooster Group is a contemporary postmodernist theater © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 21
  • 22.  English and Irish Theatre  In London, fringe theatre ▪ Postmodernist tradition ▪ Deborah Warner – English director ▪ Many contemporary playwrights begin here ▪ Caryl Churchilll (also feminist) – “Cloud Nine,” “Top Girls” ▪ Tom Stoppard © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 22
  • 23.  English and Irish Theatre continued  In Ireland ▪ Young Irish playwrights who dramatize social, political, and historical issues ▪ Martin McDonagh – “The Pillowman” ▪ Conor McPherson – “The Seafarer” © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 23
  • 24. © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 24
  • 25.  A Continuing Global Trend: Documentary Drama  Has roots in classical Greek and Elizabethan theatres  Reflects the diversity and eclecticism of our global theatre  Based on historical documents  Goal: convince the audience that they’re watching history unfold ▪ “The Investigation” by Peter Weiss – dramatizes war crime trials of Nazi guards ▪ “Exonerated” – about former death row inmates who turned out to be innocent © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 25
  • 26.  The future of theatre  The live performer: human contact between audience     and performer will continue to meet a profound, fundamental need Human impulse to create theatre: humans have a universal impulse to create theatrical activity Theatre will continue with new works alongside a rich mixture of plays from the past bringing important issues to light for specific groups as well as humanity as a whole Theatre will be as complex and fragmented as the world in which it exists Theatre will continue to focus on human concerns © 2013 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 26

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