10 Steps to Facebook Success for Your Business - Transcripts

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These are the transcripts from the 10 Steps to Facebook Success for Your Business workshop at the Navarre Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, September 28, 2010. The accompanying slide presentation is …

These are the transcripts from the 10 Steps to Facebook Success for Your Business workshop at the Navarre Beach Area Chamber of Commerce, September 28, 2010. The accompanying slide presentation is also uploaded.

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Transcript

  • 1. Intro
 The
more
FB
and
other
social
media
resources
realized
that
businesses
go
where
the
 consumers
are,
the
more
they
have
put
accompanying
business
applications
in
place
 to
help
you
reach
those
clients,
prospects,
and
your
target
audience.
They
have
come
 to
embrace
the
tools
and
networks
that
will
link
them,
and
you,
to
your
optimum
 target
market.
 What
is
your
primary
tool
to
find
new
business?
Traditional
advertising
–
tv,
radio,
 print,
etc.
,
marketing
materials
like
brochures,
direct
mail,
social
media,
website,
 press
releases,
cold
calls,
networking,
word
of
mouth
or
referrals.
Are
you
happy
 with
your
results?
Are
you
looking
for
some
different
options.
 Let’s
find
out
some
basic
information
from
the
group.
 How
do
you
keep
in
touch
with
the
people
who
are
already
your
clients?
Do
you
 have
an
ongoing
relationship
where
they
come
back
to
you
because
they
have
to
–
 like
a
doctor
or
an
orthodontist?
Or
do
they
come
back
to
you,
and
possibly
refer
 you
to
their
friends,
because
you
offer
a
great
value
or
service,
or
because
you
keep
 in
touch
with
them
in
some
way
–
maybe
through
a
blog,
newsletter
(print
or
 online),
or
RSS
feed
that
keeps
you
top
of
mind?
 Okay,
time
to
get
down
to
the
nitty
gritty.
Some
of
this
might
sound
a
little
basic
to
 you,
but
we
have
a
range
of
experience
levels
here
today
so
we
need
to
cover
all
the
 bases.
You
never
know
what
you
might
discover.
 Facebook
has
over
400
million
active
users
worldwide
with
the
average
daily
usage
 of
55
minutes
per
day.
As
Facebook,
and
other
social
media
outlets
have
tried
to
 make
their
sites
more
business
friendly
through
the
use
of
integrated
apps,
 usernames,
and
a
ton
of
information
at
your
disposal,
their
local
business
usage
has
 increased
to
1.5
million
active
business
pages.

 
 The
10
steps
we’re
going
to
look
at
today:
 1. Strategies
and
goals
for
your
Facebook
page
 2. Research
into
competing
businesses
locally,
regionally,
and
nationally
 3. Research
into
available
business
applications
that
might
benefit
your
goals
 4. Page
setup
–
basic
 5. Bring
in
your
friends
and
family
as
your
first
25
“Likes”
to
establish
your
 business
username
 6. Set
up
personalized
username
 7. Paget
setup
–
integration
of
your
social
media
and
specialized
business
 applications

  • 2. 8. Getting
“Liked”
and
joining
Groups
to
increase
your
range
 9. Page
promotion
 10. Bringing
it
all
together
to
increase
your
Search
Engine
Optimization
(SEO),
 Return
on
Investment
(ROI),
and
using
Facebook
Analytics.
 It’s
pretty
ambitious
to
get
through
all
that
in
an
hour,
but
we’ll
be
available
after
the
 workshop
if
you
have
specific
questions,
or
if
you’d
like
to
request
us
to
do
a
free
 workshop
for
your
group/office.
We
also
offer
complimentary
30‐minute
consulting
 sessions
for
new
clients.
 
 Step
1:
Strategies
and
goals
for
your
FB
page
 Another
show
of
hands.
How
many
of
you
opened
a
FB
business
page
without
 having
a
strategy
or
series
of
goals
in
place?
Come
on,
fess
up
‐
hundreds,
if
not
 thousands,
of
business
owners
do
that
every
day
–
I
have
done
it
myself
in
the
past
 when
I
was
just
learning
about
social
media.
We
all
have
to
start
somewhere.
If
your
 primary
source
of
new
business
is
referrals
or
word
of
mouth
–
as
is
the
case
with
 most
small
businesses
I
work
with
–
social
media
is
just
the
latest
resource
to
 capitalize
on
that
and
help
you
build
and
maintain
a
conversation
with
your
client.
It
 also
does
a
great
job
of
increasing
your
brand
awareness,
or
at
the
very
least,
sets
 you
apart
from
other
local
competitors
who
AREN’T
doing
social
media
or
have
any
 kind
of
online
presence.
 Not
every
business
needs
a
FB
page
so
you
need
to
ask
yourself
why
you
need
one
 before
you
start.
Are
your
customers
asking
if
you
have
one?
Do
you
have
the
time
 to
set
it
up
properly
and
maintain
it?
Social
media
is
time
consuming,
especially
at
 the
beginning.
Although
it
is
technically
free,
there
can
be
a
huge
cost
in
the
time
to
 set
up
and
maintain
an
active
presence.
You
have
to
have
a
strategy
in
place
of
how
 you
are
going
to
use
that
time
to
make
it
more
productive
for
your
individual
 company
and
what
goals
you
hope
to
achieve
through
your
FB
page.

 These
questions
will
help
you
decide
the
best
way
to
proceed,
sets
your
timeline
for
 status
updates
and
blog
posts,
and
integration
with
other
social
media
apps
that
will
 help
save
you
both
time
and
money.
It
will
take
time
to
find
all
of
the
best
apps
for
 your
business
and
to
set
them
up,
but
it’s
not
difficult
and
once
you
know
what
you
 want
to
get
out
of
FB,
the
easier
it
will
be
to
set
up
only
what
you,
and
your
target
 audience,
need.
You
can
always
add
more
later.

Just
like
small
businesses,
FB
is
 flexible.
 
 Step
2:
Research
Competing
Businesses
Locally
through
FB

  • 3. Lets
face
it,
we
all
want
to
know
what
the
competition
is
doing
–
whether
it’s
a
 Fortune
500
or
a
mom‐and‐pop
working
out
of
their
house.
Look
at
what
others
in
 your
area
are
doing
with
their
FB
pages.
Look
at
what
businesses
are
doing
 nationally
and
see
if
something
might
work
for
you.
See
if
they
offer
discounts
or
 coupons,
have
contests,
or
just
answer
questions.

 Many
businesses
–
especially
the
local,
small
businesses
with
a
tiny
“Like”
count
 rarely
get
a
lot
of
comments
or
interaction
from
their
“Likes”
–
I’m
in
the
same
boat
 and
I
do
this
for
a
living.
In
a
lot
of
cases,
especially
in
the
early
days,
most
of
your
 “Likes”
are
going
to
come
from
friends
and
family
and
they
are
just
not
into
your
 company
–
they
want
to
be
supportive
but
not
interactive.
It’s
a
necessary
evil
to
 make
you
look
significant
but
it
doesn’t
encourage
conversation
with
your
actual
 prospects
and
clients.
Spend
some
time
to
see
what
other
businesses
are
doing
to
 encourage
the
exchange
of
information,
or
a
start
to
a
great
conversation,
and
do
it
 twice
as
well.
 
 Step
3:
Research
Available
Facebook
Business
Applications
 There
are
a
ton
of
FB
business
apps
that
are
currently
available
and
more
that
come
 on
the
market
for
free
every
day.
They
range
from
integrated
social
media
apps
to
 industry
specific
applications
from
real
estate
to
FB
shopping
carts
for
online
retail
 stores.
How
many
of
you
knew
you
could
have
your
own
online
store
through
FB?

 FB
business
pages
have
truly
become
an
option
to
traditional
websites
for
small
 businesses
with
specific
industry
needs
and
very
small
budgets.
Let’s
face
it,
 websites
can
be
expensive
for
a
small
business
and
may
not
generate
the
ROI
 necessary
to
justify
it.
Trust
me,
I
design
websites
as
a
primary
part
of
my
business.
 FB
might
take
more
time
initially,
but
if
you’re
willing
to
do
the
research
yourself,
 you
can
wind
up
with
a
very
useful
site
at
a
fraction
of
the
cost.
Just
remember
that
 everything
you
give
toward
your
company
is
a
return
on
your
investment
–
actual
 costs
of
print
or
design,
or
the
time
you
take
to
do
things
on
your
own.
They
all
cost
 money.

You
have
to
justify
what
your
time
is
worth
and
if
someone
can
do
it
 cheaper
or
be
more
effective
in
a
lesser
amount
of
time
to
increase
your
ROI,
make
 sure
you
are
utilizing
those
options
to
get
the
full
value
out
of
your
FB
page
and
 other
social
media
platforms.
 
 Step
4:
The
Basics
of
Setting
Up
Your
Page
  How
to
set
up
a
page
  Basic
settings

  • 4.  Setting
up
your
profile
image
and/or
logo
–
what
are
the
new
standards?
  Setting
up
your
profile
  Tabs
  Set
multiple
admins
 Starting
the
setup:
all
business
pages
should
be
attached
to
the
business
owner’s
 profile
page.
It
is
almost
impossible
to
attach
the
business
page
to
another
profile
if
 your
employee
leaves
your
company.

 Log
in
to
your
profile
page,
look
for
the
Accounts
tab
in
the
upper
right
hand
corner.
 Under
the
drop
down
menu,
click
the
link
to
Application
Settings.
On
the
RH
side
of
 the
page,
you
will
see
Show.
Click
the
down
arrow
and
click
authorized.
Now
Ads
 and
Pages
should
appear
at
the
top
of
your
list.
Click
and
look
for
the
“Create
Page”
 tab.
Now
just
follow
the
steps
for
setting
up
your
page.
 Basic
Settings:
Once
your
page
has
been
established,
you
can
edit
your
basic
settings
 like
country
and
age
restrictions,
wall
settings,
events,
notes,
etc.
Once
you
have
 added
integrated
apps,
this
is
also
where
you
will
be
able
to
edit
them.
 Setting
up
your
profile
image
and/or
logo:
This
is
where
things
get
a
little
different
 from
a
business
page
and
your
profile
image.
Although
many
companies
don’t
utilize
 it,
Facebook
gives
you
the
option
of
adding
a
larger
profile
image
to
your
page.
It
 used
to
be
600x200
pixels
but
was
changed
in
August
2010
to
540x180.
You
can
add
 anything
to
this
image
including
your
logo,
product
pictures,
your
picture,
 information
about
your
business,
and
your
contact
information.
Just
click
on
the
 grey
question
mark
and
go
to
upload
a
picture.
Once
you
upload
the
picture,
right
 below
you
will
see
that
you
have
the
ability
to
move
the
image
around
so
the
small
 thumbnail
that
is
shown
goes
directly
to
your
logo
or
image
instead
of
in
the
middle
 of
the
picture.
Make
sure
you
do
this
when
you
set
up
the
profile
image
as
they
 sometimes
don’t
give
you
the
option
once
you’ve
clicked
Save.
If
you
don’t
have
the
 capability
to
create
this
on
your
own,
find
someone
in
your
local
area
or
online
that
 will
do
it
for
a
small
fee.
We
generally
charge
$15
for
a
profile
image
if
you
need
that
 help.
 Setting
up
your
profile:
Below
your
profile
image,
you
will
see
a
box
where
you
can
 input
your
profile
information.
Simply
put,
this
is
information
about
you
or
a
 description
of
your
business.
It
could
be
your
mission
statement,
or
just
basic
 information
about
what
your
company
does.
 Tabs:
Across
the
top
of
your
page,
you
will
see
a
series
of
tabs
–
info,
photos,
and
 discussions
are
the
standard.
Go
under
Info
(look
for
the
small
pencil
at
the
right
top
 of
the
tab
to
edit)
and
fill
out
the
information
about
your
company
–
as
much
or
as
 little
as
you
choose.
In
Photos,
create
albums
and
upload
photos
of
your
product
or
 service,
portfolios
of
your
work,
or
other
industry
related
images.
If
you
click
the
+

  • 5. sign,
you’ll
see
that
you
have
the
option
to
add
additional
and
custom
tabs.
Facebook
 has
a
set
number
of
optional
tabs
like
Links,
Notes,
Video
and
Events.
 Setting
admins:
Once
you
start
approving
“Likes”,
you
can
set
other
people
up
with
 admin
privileges.
I
highly
recommend
you
do
this.
If
you
get
injured
and
are
not
able
 to
access
your
account,
it
will
allow
another
person
to
continue
with
updates
so
 your
page
does
not
go
down.
It
also
helps
spread
the
labor
of
making
your
site
more
 effective,
as
long
as
you’re
all
sharing
the
same
message.
Make
sure
it
is
someone
 you
trust.
You
can
always
delete
any
additional
admins
on
your
page,
just
make
sure
 you
don’t
delete
yourself.
 
 Step
5:
Suggesting
your
new
business
page
  Why
this
matters
at
the
beginning
of
a
new
business
page
  Business
FB
usernames
after
25
friends
  Quality
vs.
quantity
 Once
you
have
your
page
set
up
and
you
are
happy
with
it,
click
the
link
below
your
 profile
image
“Suggest
to
Friends”.
Let’s
face
it,
in
the
early
days
of
your
business
 page,
these
will
be
your
first
“Likes”.
It
is
very
important
to
get
25
“Likes”
as
quickly
 as
possible
so
you
can
setup
your
personalized
username.
Once
you
have
that
set
up,
 start
suggesting
that
your
clients
and
prospects
visit
and
“Like”
your
page.
Tell
the
 world
about
your
page.
But
one
of
the
most
important
things
is
that
you
look
for
 quality
“Likes”
as
opposed
to
sheer
quantity.
There
are
a
lot
of
spammers
out
there
 just
looking
for
a
way
onto
your
page
to
spread
their
message
and
sales
junk.
Look
 for
people
that
will
read
what
you
post
and
will
enter
into
the
conversation
and
 engage
with
your
business.
This
is
the
hardest
part
of
a
FB
business
page
but
is
 worthwhile
if
you
get
it
right.
 
 Step
6:
Setup
a
Username
 Once
you
have
hit
that
magical
25
“Likes”
you
can
set
up
your
personalized
business
 name.
Be
careful,
you
can
only
set
it
once
so
make
sure
it
is
exactly
what
you
want.

 Go
to
http://www.facebook.com/username
and
go
to
the
page
you’d
like
to
set.
You
 can
have
multiple
pages,
so
make
sure
you’re
setting
the
correct
one
for
your
 business.
 

  • 6. Step
7:
Setting
Up
Your
Page
–
Dressing
it
Up
with
Integrated
Apps
  Blogs
  Twitter
  LinkedIn
  YouTube
  SlideShare
  RSS
Feeeds
  Constant
Contact
  Shopping
Carts
  Industry
Specific
–
retail,
real
estate,
finance,
doctors,
etc.
 There
are
many
ways
you
can
integrate
Facebook
into
your
other
social
media
 platforms
and
Facebook
business
apps.
You
can
have
your
personal
blog
available
 on
your
FB
page,
link
FB
to
Twitter,
LinkedIn,
YouTube,
SlideShare,
RSS
feeds
and
 more.
If
you
sell
specific
products,
you
can
put
up
an
online
store
with
the
click
of
a
 button.
There
are
even
industry
specific
apps
that
allow
you
to
bring
custom
apps
 right
into
your
FB
page.
 One
of
the
biggest
reason
to
add
these
applications
is
that
it
cuts
down
on
your
 overall
time
with
social
media
updates.
Your
tweets
will
post
to
your
FB
status
feed,
 and
visa
versa.
Updating
LinkedIn
will
auto
post
to
your
FB
status.
Have
a
new
blog
 post
on
your
site
or
in
WordPress.
Now
it
automatically
shows
up
on
your
FB
page.
 You
can
have
all
of
these
apps
running
in
the
background,
or
you
can
have
a
new
tab
 at
the
top
of
the
page.
If
you
have
an
integrated
blog,
you
can
have
a
“Blog”
tab.
It’s
 the
same
for
“Shop”
or
“Real
Estate”.

There
are
even
apps
that
allow
you
to
hold
 contests
and
competitions
for
your
“Likes”.
 There
are
hundreds
of
business‐based
applications
that
can
help
you
customize
 your
site.
To
find
these,
go
to
Edit
Page
and
scroll
to
the
very
bottom.
Look
for
More
 Applications
and
click
on
Browse
More.
On
the
left
hand
side
of
the
page,
you’ll
see
a
 list
of
applications
you
can
add
to
your
site.
Click
Business.
Below
the
icons,
you’ll
 see
the
most
popular
apps.
Click
on
See
All
so
you
can
see
everything
available
to
 you.
If
you
see
an
application
you’d
like
to
add
to
your
page,
click
the
name
or
icon
 and
it
will
take
you
to
their
page
and
then
click
the
button
below
their
image
that
 says
“Go
to
Application”
or
click
“Add
to
my
Page”,
click
Allow
and
then
set
up
the
 app
to
your
needs.
Be
careful,
not
all
apps
are
free.
Know
what
you’re
paying
for
and
 make
sure
you’re
going
to
use
it.
 

  • 7. Step
8:
Getting
“Liked”
and
Joining
Groups
  Find
other
businesses
in
the
area
–
look
at
their
“Likes”
and
friend
them
  Find
complimentary
businesses
–
look
at
their
“Likes”
and
friend
them
  Search
for
groups
who
have
similar
(but
not
competitive)
services
or
 interests
–
Look
at
their
“Likes”
and
friend
them.
Use
the
search
box
at
the
 top
of
the
page
and
enter
a
keyword
for
the
type
of
group
you
are
looking
for.
 It’s
that
simple.
  Search
for
your
company
or
your
vendors
and
“Like”
their
pages
–
remember
 you’re
looking
for
quality,
not
quantity.
  Client
base
  Prospective
clients
  Network
business
friends
and
Chamber
members
  Give
discounts
and
coupons
to
your
clients
and
prospects
for
Liking
your
 page.
Use
your
status
updates
to
offer
specials
only
to
your
users.
 
 Step
9:
Promote
your
page
  Create
interesting
and/or
useful
content
  80/20
rule
–
80%
content
vs.
20%
sales
content
  Use
images
and
links,
news
items,
blog
posts
and
ask
your
readers
for
 feedback
  Ask
questions
or
ask
your
user’s
opinion.
Invite
them
to
comment
on
your
 updates
or
links
  Polls
  Contests/competitions
online
  Discounts
or
coupons
for
joining
and
being
active
on
the
site
  Encourage
image
uploads
showing
your
users
interacting
with
your
product
 or
service
  Post
testimonials
  Add
a
FB
fan
box
or
feed
to
your
website
  Add
a
“Like”
button
to
your
website
that
a
user
can
click
without
ever
going
 to
your
FB
page
  Show
how
you
are
interacting
with
your
community
or
clients
and
where
 they
can
find
you
next
  Promote
through
biz
cards,
email
signatures,
Like
buttons
and
FB
feeds
on
 your
website,
stationery,
brochures,
etc.
 The
biggest
way
to
promote
your
page
is
to
post
interesting
and/or
useful
content.
It
 doesn’t
all
have
to
come
from
you.
Post
links
to
blogs
that
you
think
will
be
relevant
 to
your
readers,
post
quotes,
have
a
relevant
RSS
feed
that
posts
status
updates,
talk

  • 8. about
your
newest
project
or
client.
Ask
questions.
Remember
that
this
is
a
 conversation.
In
the
beginning,
it
will
seem
like
it’s
a
one
way
conversation
–
just
 you
talking,
but
as
you
build
up
your
Like
base,
you’ll
begin
to
see
more
interaction
 on
the
page.
Think
about
things
that
you
would
respond
to
and
post
that.
Make
it
 engaging
and
your
readers
will
engage.
A
good
rule
of
thumb
is
to
only
post
1‐2
 times
a
day
so
you
don’t
overwhelm
your
reader’s
Wall.
 One
of
the
biggest
no‐no’s
in
Social
Media
is
only
posting
sales
content.
You’re
 establishing
a
relationship
here,
not
trying
to
sell
them
a
car.
You
will
be
quickly
 Unliked
if
the
only
message
you’re
putting
out
there
is
that
you
want
to
sell
 something.
You
can
post
some
sales
messages
or
offer
your
product
or
service,
but
 not
every
post.
Keep
to
the
80/20
rule
and
you
should
be
fine.
 
 Step
10:
Tracking
Your
Progress:
SEO/
Analytics
/
ROI
 Many
businesses
do
not
realize
that
their
business
status
posts
are
searchable
by
 the
search
engines
and
can
be
displayed
in
search
engine
results.
That
can
be
really
 great
for
your
business
because
it
gives
you
more
relevance.
But
one
of
the
things
 they
are
looking
for
is
a
complete
conversation.
They
are
more
likely
to
display
an
 update
that
has
a
lot
of
comments,
or
from
a
page
with
a
lot
of
“Likes”.
 Just
like
in
your
website,
keywords
are
very
important.
Have
a
clear
idea
of
the
 keywords
and
key
phrases
that
you
identify
with
your
company
and
make
sure
you
 put
those
keywords
and
phrases
in
all
of
your
updates,
Tweets,
blogs,
RSS
feeds,
 your
profile
and
info
tabs,
etc.
It
will
make
it
easier
for
the
search
engines
to
find
 you
and
you
always
want
to
make
that
as
interesting
as
possible.
 Want
to
be
able
to
track
your
SEO
and
Analytics
in
Facebook?
It
is
already
setup
on
 every
FB
business
page
under
the
Insight
box
on
the
left
side
of
your
page.
It
is
only
 viewable
to
admins
so
don’t
worry
about
your
users
seeing
them.
 This
is
where
we
start
thinking
back
to
our
goals
and
strategy
from
Step
1.
You
can
 check
your
monthly
active
users,
new
Likes,
total
Likes,
daily
post
views,
post
 feedback,
demographics,
and
page
activity.
As
you
play
around
with
your
content
to
 find
a
good
mix
for
your
readers,
you’ll
be
able
to
track
your
progress.
But
it’s
 difficult
to
track
how
well
you’re
meeting
your
goals
without
setting
up
realistic
 goals
to
start
with.
 In
most
cases,
the
most
you
will
put
into
setting
up
and
maintaining
your
social
 media
outlets
will
be
your
time,
and
it
can
be
very
time
consuming,
especially
at
 first.
Most
people
review
ROI
as
only
monetary
return
on
investment.
Here
your
 investment
is
the
time
you
put
into
this.
As
I
said
before,
a
FB
business
page
isn’t
for

  • 9. every
business.
You
have
to
make
the
time
commitment
to
be
able
to
see
an
 appreciable
return
of
brand
awareness,
increased
client
interaction,
and
a
personal
 feeling
from
your
clients
and
prospects
that
they
know
who
you
are
and
what
your
 business
is
about.
That
relationship
is
the
biggest
return
I
can
imagine
for
any
 business
owner.
 
 About
Us:
 Go
Get
Creative
Design
and
Marketing
is
a
full‐service
company
specializing
in
ways
 to
help
your
business
reach
it’s
goals.
We
can
help
with
graphic
and
web
design,
 social
media
communications,
internet
marketing
and
SEO,
branding,
and
marketing
 consultants.
 Brenda
Whitfield,
co‐owner
of
GGCDM,
has
been
in
the
creative
industry
since
1991
 as
a
writer,
graphic
and
web
designer,
creative
director,
business
owner,
and
more
 recently
has
added
social
media
communication
and
internet
marketing
to
her
wide
 range
of
interests.
She
has
an
AA
degree
in
Business
Management,
a
BA
degree
in
 Communications
with
an
emphasis
in
Public
Relations
and
Advertising,
and
 completed
her
MA
degree
in
Managing
Creative
Enterprises
in
2008.
 If
you
have
any
questions,
please
email
brenda@gogetcreative.com
 Shawn
Whitfield,
co‐owner
of
GGCDM,
is
a
19‐year
active
duty
Air
Force
member.
 He
brings
a
wide
range
of
skills
and
interests
in
marketing,
management
consulting,
 and
internet
marketing
and
has
worked
side‐by‐side
with
Brenda
as
co‐owner
of
 GGCDM
for
the
past
8
years.
He
has
a
degree
in
Management
Studies
and
completed
 his
MA
in
Managing
Creative
Enterprises
in
2008.
 If
you
have
any
questions,
please
email
shawn@gogetcreative.com