The Adoption of Public Urban Space as a Driving Force for Third Places

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Presented at workshop HCI3P within CHI'13 conference, April 2013, Paris.

Presented at workshop HCI3P within CHI'13 conference, April 2013, Paris.

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  • 1. The Adoption of Urban Public Space as a Driving Force for Third Places in the Remediation of Democracy P. Caianiello & S. Costantini & *F. Gobbo & D. Leombruni & L. Tarantino University of L’Aquila HCI3P, Univ. Paris-Dauphine, April 27-28, 2013 1 of 21
  • 2. Introduction
  • 3. Politics 2.0, year 2011 Year 2011 was defined a year of revolutions (Fuchs) where social movements, also using social networks such as Twitter and Facebook, occupied the public space (Castells). 3 of 21
  • 4. Social networks now: men & machines These twofold social networks – made by machine and real people at the same time – arrange ICT-empowered choreographies of assembly (Gerbaudo): a Third Place is temporary re-shaped, so to get visibility for a specific, focused topic of public interest and protest. 4 of 21
  • 5. Social networks now: men & machines These twofold social networks – made by machine and real people at the same time – arrange ICT-empowered choreographies of assembly (Gerbaudo): a Third Place is temporary re-shaped, so to get visibility for a specific, focused topic of public interest and protest. A typical form of choreography of assembly is the flash mob. 4 of 21
  • 6. ICT and flash mobs Advantages brought by ICT, e.g. using smart phones: it is easy to shot a photo and share the action; activists can group together using existing social networks; all actions are put in time and space, which are recorded afterwards (hyperlocality, see Carroll, here at HCI3P). 6 of 21
  • 7. ICT and flash mobs Advantages brought by ICT, e.g. using smart phones: it is easy to shot a photo and share the action; activists can group together using existing social networks; all actions are put in time and space, which are recorded afterwards (hyperlocality, see Carroll, here at HCI3P). Current limits: duration: it is difficult to trace the history of actions in time – “how is it going?” (trails, see Walker et al., here at HCI3P) and especially the end of the story – “issue was solved in dd/mm/yyy”. visibility: there is no ICT-empowered environment to put the raised issue to the appropriate government level (e.g., Azienda Diritto allo Studio L’Aquila). 6 of 21
  • 8. Emepolis, our proposal
  • 9. The background: call for ideas In the aftermath of the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake, Accenture opened a call for ideas, in collaboration with Fondazione Italiana Accenture and Alumni Accenture, where “Emepolis – my city” was the winning idea in the category ICT for teams (high school students). 8 of 21
  • 10. The background: call for ideas In the aftermath of the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake, Accenture opened a call for ideas, in collaboration with Fondazione Italiana Accenture and Alumni Accenture, where “Emepolis – my city” was the winning idea in the category ICT for teams (high school students). Our Dep. of Inf. Eng.,Comp. Sc. & Maths (DISIM) realized the prototype of Emepolis, a smartphone app to foster citizens’ participation towards the reconstruction of the damaged city. 8 of 21
  • 11. The method: focus group and brainstorming We considered young citizens (15-25 years) as our main target, living in a EU medium-sized city, who want to partecipate to the political arena, especially at a local level (city, province, region). We found some features of the mobile application: 9 of 21
  • 12. The method: focus group and brainstorming We considered young citizens (15-25 years) as our main target, living in a EU medium-sized city, who want to partecipate to the political arena, especially at a local level (city, province, region). We found some features of the mobile application: multilingualism: we prepared the GUI in English, Italian, Albanian; citizens can propose issues and vote others’ (C2C level); governance representatives should receive open issues appropriately and close them (when issue is fixed) as special users of a social network (C2G level); the social network should “not be a bad clone of Facebook”. 9 of 21
  • 13. The user-centered design of Emepolis We designed and developed the prototype of Emepolis following what emerged from the focus group: a server-side application, based on a graph DBMS, as it adapts to the growth of the social network, with a user profile kept to the minimum; a client-side application, optimized for Apple iOs and Google Android. 10 of 21
  • 14. The user-centered design of Emepolis We designed and developed the prototype of Emepolis following what emerged from the focus group: a server-side application, based on a graph DBMS, as it adapts to the growth of the social network, with a user profile kept to the minimum; a client-side application, optimized for Apple iOs and Google Android. Citizens can only use the application to open or promote issues (not to suggest the best coffee in town!) because macro-categories of the issues are preempted and mandatory. 10 of 21
  • 15. The user-centered design of Emepolis We designed and developed the prototype of Emepolis following what emerged from the focus group: a server-side application, based on a graph DBMS, as it adapts to the growth of the social network, with a user profile kept to the minimum; a client-side application, optimized for Apple iOs and Google Android. Citizens can only use the application to open or promote issues (not to suggest the best coffee in town!) because macro-categories of the issues are preempted and mandatory. Macro-categories were borrowed from a EU 7FP-funded project about Smart Cities (now finished): http://www.smart-cities.eu/. 10 of 21
  • 16. Some screenshots
  • 17. Further directions of work
  • 18. Open questions for our workshop How to manage ‘sparse information and interaction’ (suprathreshold, Carroll, here at HCI3P)? How to integrate the historical information of a nurtured community garden, i.e., public or shared pieces of land cultivated for a common good storytelling of the community (Calderon et al., here at HCI3P)? Is Emepolis an example of Bannon’s human-centered computing (HCC) (in Thompson and Steier, here at HCI3P)? How to improve it under this aspect? 18 of 21
  • 19. Open questions for our workshop How to manage ‘sparse information and interaction’ (suprathreshold, Carroll, here at HCI3P)? How to integrate the historical information of a nurtured community garden, i.e., public or shared pieces of land cultivated for a common good storytelling of the community (Calderon et al., here at HCI3P)? Is Emepolis an example of Bannon’s human-centered computing (HCC) (in Thompson and Steier, here at HCI3P)? How to improve it under this aspect? We are open for discussion and collaboration 18 of 21
  • 20. Do you feel Oldenburg’s definitions are relevant to your project? Yes. In what sense? When a natural disaster destroys the usual Third Places of a given community (citizens of L’Aquila), people feel to be lost, and we have to rebuild them not only physically. 19 of 21
  • 21. In our work, the most important aspects of social spaces are 1. public public (not only open-to-the-public) Third Places arise as the points of interests of sensible issues; 2. the costruction of temporary social spaces doesn’t fit the need of the community: they want the original experience again! 3. mobile ICT is considered at the service of technology (tekn´e ancilla societatis) 20 of 21
  • 22. Thanks for your attention! Questions? For proposals, ideas & comments: federico.gobbo@univaq.it Download & share these slides here: http://slidesha.re/11Jk09h CC BY: $ C Federico Gobbo 2013 21 of 21