The Adoption of Public Urban Space as a Driving Force for Third Places
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

The Adoption of Public Urban Space as a Driving Force for Third Places

on

  • 494 views

Presented at workshop HCI3P within CHI'13 conference, April 2013, Paris.

Presented at workshop HCI3P within CHI'13 conference, April 2013, Paris.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
494
Views on SlideShare
494
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

The Adoption of Public Urban Space as a Driving Force for Third Places The Adoption of Public Urban Space as a Driving Force for Third Places Presentation Transcript

  • The Adoption of Urban Public Space as a Driving Force for Third Places in the Remediation of Democracy P. Caianiello & S. Costantini & *F. Gobbo & D. Leombruni & L. Tarantino University of L’Aquila HCI3P, Univ. Paris-Dauphine, April 27-28, 2013 1 of 21
  • Introduction
  • Politics 2.0, year 2011 Year 2011 was defined a year of revolutions (Fuchs) where social movements, also using social networks such as Twitter and Facebook, occupied the public space (Castells). 3 of 21
  • Social networks now: men & machines These twofold social networks – made by machine and real people at the same time – arrange ICT-empowered choreographies of assembly (Gerbaudo): a Third Place is temporary re-shaped, so to get visibility for a specific, focused topic of public interest and protest. 4 of 21
  • Social networks now: men & machines These twofold social networks – made by machine and real people at the same time – arrange ICT-empowered choreographies of assembly (Gerbaudo): a Third Place is temporary re-shaped, so to get visibility for a specific, focused topic of public interest and protest. A typical form of choreography of assembly is the flash mob. 4 of 21
  • ICT and flash mobs Advantages brought by ICT, e.g. using smart phones: it is easy to shot a photo and share the action; activists can group together using existing social networks; all actions are put in time and space, which are recorded afterwards (hyperlocality, see Carroll, here at HCI3P). 6 of 21
  • ICT and flash mobs Advantages brought by ICT, e.g. using smart phones: it is easy to shot a photo and share the action; activists can group together using existing social networks; all actions are put in time and space, which are recorded afterwards (hyperlocality, see Carroll, here at HCI3P). Current limits: duration: it is difficult to trace the history of actions in time – “how is it going?” (trails, see Walker et al., here at HCI3P) and especially the end of the story – “issue was solved in dd/mm/yyy”. visibility: there is no ICT-empowered environment to put the raised issue to the appropriate government level (e.g., Azienda Diritto allo Studio L’Aquila). 6 of 21
  • Emepolis, our proposal
  • The background: call for ideas In the aftermath of the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake, Accenture opened a call for ideas, in collaboration with Fondazione Italiana Accenture and Alumni Accenture, where “Emepolis – my city” was the winning idea in the category ICT for teams (high school students). 8 of 21
  • The background: call for ideas In the aftermath of the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake, Accenture opened a call for ideas, in collaboration with Fondazione Italiana Accenture and Alumni Accenture, where “Emepolis – my city” was the winning idea in the category ICT for teams (high school students). Our Dep. of Inf. Eng.,Comp. Sc. & Maths (DISIM) realized the prototype of Emepolis, a smartphone app to foster citizens’ participation towards the reconstruction of the damaged city. 8 of 21
  • The method: focus group and brainstorming We considered young citizens (15-25 years) as our main target, living in a EU medium-sized city, who want to partecipate to the political arena, especially at a local level (city, province, region). We found some features of the mobile application: 9 of 21
  • The method: focus group and brainstorming We considered young citizens (15-25 years) as our main target, living in a EU medium-sized city, who want to partecipate to the political arena, especially at a local level (city, province, region). We found some features of the mobile application: multilingualism: we prepared the GUI in English, Italian, Albanian; citizens can propose issues and vote others’ (C2C level); governance representatives should receive open issues appropriately and close them (when issue is fixed) as special users of a social network (C2G level); the social network should “not be a bad clone of Facebook”. 9 of 21
  • The user-centered design of Emepolis We designed and developed the prototype of Emepolis following what emerged from the focus group: a server-side application, based on a graph DBMS, as it adapts to the growth of the social network, with a user profile kept to the minimum; a client-side application, optimized for Apple iOs and Google Android. 10 of 21
  • The user-centered design of Emepolis We designed and developed the prototype of Emepolis following what emerged from the focus group: a server-side application, based on a graph DBMS, as it adapts to the growth of the social network, with a user profile kept to the minimum; a client-side application, optimized for Apple iOs and Google Android. Citizens can only use the application to open or promote issues (not to suggest the best coffee in town!) because macro-categories of the issues are preempted and mandatory. 10 of 21
  • The user-centered design of Emepolis We designed and developed the prototype of Emepolis following what emerged from the focus group: a server-side application, based on a graph DBMS, as it adapts to the growth of the social network, with a user profile kept to the minimum; a client-side application, optimized for Apple iOs and Google Android. Citizens can only use the application to open or promote issues (not to suggest the best coffee in town!) because macro-categories of the issues are preempted and mandatory. Macro-categories were borrowed from a EU 7FP-funded project about Smart Cities (now finished): http://www.smart-cities.eu/. 10 of 21
  • Some screenshots
  • Further directions of work
  • Open questions for our workshop How to manage ‘sparse information and interaction’ (suprathreshold, Carroll, here at HCI3P)? How to integrate the historical information of a nurtured community garden, i.e., public or shared pieces of land cultivated for a common good storytelling of the community (Calderon et al., here at HCI3P)? Is Emepolis an example of Bannon’s human-centered computing (HCC) (in Thompson and Steier, here at HCI3P)? How to improve it under this aspect? 18 of 21
  • Open questions for our workshop How to manage ‘sparse information and interaction’ (suprathreshold, Carroll, here at HCI3P)? How to integrate the historical information of a nurtured community garden, i.e., public or shared pieces of land cultivated for a common good storytelling of the community (Calderon et al., here at HCI3P)? Is Emepolis an example of Bannon’s human-centered computing (HCC) (in Thompson and Steier, here at HCI3P)? How to improve it under this aspect? We are open for discussion and collaboration 18 of 21
  • Do you feel Oldenburg’s definitions are relevant to your project? Yes. In what sense? When a natural disaster destroys the usual Third Places of a given community (citizens of L’Aquila), people feel to be lost, and we have to rebuild them not only physically. 19 of 21
  • In our work, the most important aspects of social spaces are 1. public public (not only open-to-the-public) Third Places arise as the points of interests of sensible issues; 2. the costruction of temporary social spaces doesn’t fit the need of the community: they want the original experience again! 3. mobile ICT is considered at the service of technology (tekn´e ancilla societatis) 20 of 21
  • Thanks for your attention! Questions? For proposals, ideas & comments: federico.gobbo@univaq.it Download & share these slides here: http://slidesha.re/11Jk09h CC BY: $ C Federico Gobbo 2013 21 of 21