Design Caffeine For Search and Browse UI IASummit2010
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Design Caffeine For Search and Browse UI IASummit2010

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Design Caffeine for Search and Browse UI presented at IA Summit 2010

Design Caffeine for Search and Browse UI presented at IA Summit 2010

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  • The sub-title of this talk is --
  • What’s wrong with this page? Anyone? Can you tell it’s a zero search results page? No? You’re not alone. The only thing that tells you that the app did not find any results for Opeenheimer Small & Mid Cap Value Fund is this little black 0 here. Compare this with…
  • What’s wrong with this page? Anyone? Can you tell it’s a zero search results page? No? You’re not alone. The only thing that tells you that the app did not find any results for Opeenheimer Small & Mid Cap Value Fund is this little black 0 here. Compare this with…
  • Google’s “did you mean” feature – not only does it tell you we did not find anything useful, it recommends something to take away the pain. The moral of the story? Don’t be afraid to say I did not understand. It’s OK – it’s not you. It’s me. *I* the system, did not get it. OK what’s the second issue I see a lot of?
  • This – this is Endless.com. And the page is literally endless. I mean it – you can endlessly push all those little buttons sliders, controls, and it is never going to produce a single search result. links are actually filtering controls that serve only to further constrain the search that already has no results. Instead of providing a way out, these filter links instead suck the customer deeper into the quagmire of the no search results, now requiring multiple clicks of the Back button to get back to some useful content.
  • What’s the moral of the story? Read and heed the following words of wisdom:
  • What’s the moral of the story? Read and heed the following words of wisdom:
  • Strart your design from zero search results, because after all the heated team discussions on whether the search button needs to be white or red…
  • … and after your users will lose themselves compeltely in your faboulous IA….
  • …… the thing that your custoemrs will remember most is the zero search results page, which will linger behind even AFTER the finding expereince is over …
  • ... like the grin of the cheshire cat.
  • Amazon uses links, which primarily correspond to Drill-down. In contrast, Kayak uses Parallel selection, usually done with checkboxes…
  • Now folks at Office Depot, decided that while one paradigm is good, two must sure be better. Here is how it works: once a customer selects the $50-$100 check box, the UI drills down into the $50-$100 price range and removes the $50 and below check box, breaking the affordance of a group of check boxes that should let customers select multiple, parallel OR values for a single filter. Instead, the user interface now displays $50-$60 and $60-$70 ranges, while still displaying the range of $50-$100 the customer originally selected as one of the available OR values. This is a little like
  • Cement Mixer, one of the worst shots ever created according to CampusSqueeze.com
  • Provide an obvious and consistent way to undo filter selection.
  • OK, Cement Mixer UI was fun, but how do I undo? The Office Depot user interface is particularly sensitive to the order in which a user deselects the check boxes for a single filter. For example, the price filter option $50-$100 simply disappears if a user deselects it before the $50-$60 filter option. Note the number of items is still 2! A customer would have to click the browser’s Back button twice to undo both selections, because there is no other way to return to the default state. Typically, all of the available filters and options, plus the data that appears on a page can change after each click. The key is to avoid completely removing options in the same filter where the click took place.
  • Please don’t misunderstand me. I am not saying all filters should be visible at the same time. It is perfectly acceptable to collapse filters to just a label, providing a single link like View All Filters , or to display previously selected filtering options in a unique way. However, if at different steps in the search workflow, filters start randomly disappearing from the search user interface with no way to bring them back, bad things start to happen very quickly.
  • Now I like Red things, as you can see – but not to the exclusion of all other filters. Once I select a color, all of the other filters disappear entirely. Does this system behavior make any sense? Let’s say I want to buy a red chair mat. Under Color , I can select the Red check box and view a great variety of red chair mats. Is there really a compelling reason for me to do anything else with the color filter? Will I, as a true connoisseur of all things red, perhaps drill down into shades of red for my chair mat, such as Burgundy, Farmhouse Red, or Ripe Tomato? Not very likely—at least not for chair mats. Instead, I am much more likely to say, okay, these are all of the red chair mats. Great! Now, can I select a mat from a known brand? Or perhaps I would like a budget-priced mat, so I need to further constrain my search by price. Or maybe I am a stupendous fan of the Ohio Buckeyes and want to find a chair mat with my team logo, leaving fans of the Michigan Wolverines green with envy. Using other filters to continue massaging my red chair mats query is a far more likely scenario. Alternatively, let’s consider a different use case: I just selected Red, and now I can see a bunch of red chair mats. Almost immediately, I realize that these red chair mats are almost, but not quite, entirely unlike the mat I actually want to buy. [Greg: this is a homage to one of my favorite Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy quotes: " almost , but not quite , entirely unlike tea ".  I’m more in favor of economy of words, but okay. You’re changing tense in the next sentence, but shouldn’t.] So, I immediately attempt to seek out two things: a way to undo my most recent selection a way to review what other filtering options I might want to use Unfortunately for both these use cases, when I selected a color, the Office Depot search user interface unhelpfully removed all other filters.
  • This action would be tantamount to Kayak’s removing all other filters like departure and arrival times, number of stops, price, and class whenever a customer selected a particular airline. How helpful do you think that would be to someone trying to find a flight? Removing any filters completely can be detrimental to customer success and is, therefore, not recommended.
  • Last but not least, who can tell me what 2 things are missing from the Color Menu? (Clear Mats and Item Numbers) As you can see in Figure 7, the Office Depot search user interface does not display the most common chair mat color, which is clear . Thus, clicking options for this filter means the site displays only a fraction of the available inventory—in this case, only 16 of 23 available items. The seven chair mats that are clear have no color attribute, so customers can never choose to view those items using the Office Depot user interface. They can only remove clear mats from consideration by specifying a color value. This system behavior is clearly not beneficial to someone looking for a chair mat—especially if they are looking for the most common variety. I am not sure what Office Depot’s reason for omitting clear from their color options might be, but it is reasonable to assume that the clear chair mats have the color attribute of empty, or null. Therefore, it is not possible to group these items under a valid color filter attribute. Fortunately, one fairly straightforward way to resolve any missing or inconsistent data is to include Other or All Others as a filter option. The SQL condition corresponding to Other should specifically include any items for which the color field is empty, or null, enabling customers always to view the entire inventory by using some combination of the available filter selections.
  • Cautionary Tale in the manner of Lewis Carol, goes something like this…
  • Unfortunately, most sites today do not integrate faceted search and browse effectively. For example, Walmart.com approaches browse and search using two different interfaces creating a jumble of duplicate controls that overwhelm the customer, making the site more difficult to use. A veritable cornucopia of filters, links and options on Walmart.com make it unlikely that the customers will be able to duplicate the search successfully or efficiently discover related items and content. Duplicate finding methods also create a problem for natural search, because each finding page exists only within the context of the specific session.
  • Here I’d like to propose the Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb (IFB) design that integrates the power of faceted refinement with the intuitive query expansion afforded by browse. Although other breadcrumb-based finding interfaces currently exist, they fall short of expectations by ignoring design best practices. At best, the breadcrumb is stuck in a role of a side-kick, forced to eke out meager screen real estate along-side more powerful finding controls.
  • Turns out there are 3 types of breadcrumbs: Location, Path & Attribute breadcrumbs as cataloged by Keith Instone Some of types of breadcrumbs are more resoucerful than others.
  • In faceted search interfaces, Attribute breadcrumbs commonly convey applied facet values such as price, category, style and brand. For exmaple, Attribute breadcrumbs are Path breadcrumbs, displaying facet values in the order they were applied by the customer to reach the current set of search results. Attribute-Path breadcrumb UI on the Ariba Discovery Network. Unfortunately, Attribute-Path breadcrumb is not resourceful from the standpoint of integrating search and browse and helping people find related content: Temporal breadcrumb cannot be used to effectively link and anchor categories, landing pages, brand catalogs and other browse pages, precisely because it is carrying all of the attribute history instead. Temporal breadcrumb cannot be used to effectively show the customer where they can go because instead it is busy showing them where they’ve been . Pages with Temporal breadcrumbs cannot be effectively linked by natural search, because people creating different URLs each time the content is accessed. When the query changes, attributes appear to “randomly” jump around on the breadcrumb.
  • In faceted search interfaces, Attribute breadcrumbs commonly convey applied facet values such as price, category, style and brand. For exmaple, Attribute breadcrumbs are Path breadcrumbs, displaying facet values in the order they were applied by the customer to reach the current set of search results. Attribute-Path breadcrumb UI on the Ariba Discovery Network. Unfortunately, Attribute-Path breadcrumb is not resourceful from the standpoint of integrating search and browse and helping people find related content: Temporal breadcrumb cannot be used to effectively link and anchor categories, landing pages, brand catalogs and other browse pages, precisely because it is carrying all of the attribute history instead. Temporal breadcrumb cannot be used to effectively show the customer where they can go because instead it is busy showing them where they’ve been . Pages with Temporal breadcrumbs cannot be effectively linked by natural search, because people creating different URLs each time the content is accessed. When the query changes, attributes appear to “randomly” jump around on the breadcrumb.
  • Applied aspects are removed from the breadcrumb by un-checking the checkbox next to the applied aspect in the breadcrumb. For most people, set-remove-set interaction conflicts with their mental model. As one of my evaluators stated: “This feels like having to turn off the radio every time I want to change the station”. Instead of removing Canon in order to select Nikon, most people think in terms of simply changing Canon to Nikon, which can be accomplished most readily with a drop-down control.  [GN-what do you think of the changes? cb - looks good.] The drop-down is more intuitive than a typical remove mechanism, as it allows the user to discover all of the navigation options available from the parent facet or category. This idea was first introduced by Luke Wroblewski in his excellent book Site Seeing : a Visual Approach to Web Usability . One of the sites that implement drop down in the breadcrumb is Edmunds.com
  • Applied aspects are removed from the breadcrumb by un-checking the checkbox next to the applied aspect in the breadcrumb. For most people, set-remove-set interaction conflicts with their mental model. As one of my evaluators stated: “This feels like having to turn off the radio every time I want to change the station”. Instead of removing Canon in order to select Nikon, most people think in terms of simply changing Canon to Nikon, which can be accomplished most readily with a drop-down control.  [GN-what do you think of the changes? cb - looks good.] The drop-down is more intuitive than a typical remove mechanism, as it allows the user to discover all of the navigation options available from the parent facet or category. This idea was first introduced by Luke Wroblewski in his excellent book Site Seeing : a Visual Approach to Web Usability . One of the sites that implement drop down in the breadcrumb is Edmunds.com
  • In my testing, vast majority of people preferred this design to a more common set-remove-set paradigm and found it very intuitive and effective. I found that people seldom want to start the query over completely from scratch, unless they specifically indicated this action. Instead, they wanted to retain as much of the query as possible with every change of the facet values, and expect the system to help them construct a query that “makes sense”, gracefully dropping facet selections that no longer apply to their new query.
  • Unfortunately, few sites today implement this function well. For example, changing the model from Mustang to Fusion does not retain the year selection of 2005, as most people would expect. Instead, as shown in figure 7, Edmunds.com resets the model year to the current year, 2010, which simply disappears from the breadcrumb.
  • I found that a more resourceful system behavior is to retain any relevant attribute values that apply to the new query, preferably in way that always produces some search results. Figure 8 shows how Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb design handles the change in the Product Type from Digital Cameras to Lenses, retaining the Brand and Keywords aspect, while dropping the Camera Resolution aspect (as it does not apply to Lenses). Retaining aspects that apply to the updated query allows the customer to concentrate on their finding goals, while the system takes care of the details. What if the person really wanted to browse just the Lenses Product Type? My testing showed that most people found it very intuitive to click the Lenses link in order to navigate to the Lenses Product Type landing page. The result of combining drop-down control functionality with the existing breadcrumb link interaction gives us a powerful, intuitive, flexible finding control.
  • What if instead of browsing, someone wanted to remove a single applied aspect from a breadcrumb, leaving the rest of the query intact?  My research showed that most people found it easy and intuitive to navigate to the drop down and select “See All” option Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb design provides at the #1 position in the drop-down, as shown. In Design Cop-out #2: Breadcrumbs [http://www.uie.com/articles/breadcrumbs], Jared Spool mentions that the biggest problem with breadcrumbs is “the lack of scent” and that “the wording of the individual trail elements becomes very important”. While most applications simply display the applied aspects in the breadcrumb, my research shows that labeling each of the applied aspects with the aspects name adds a great deal of information scent. The resulting IFB “breadcrumb tiles” (shown in Figure 9) display relevant aspect labels which help customers make sense of their queries and orient themselves quickly if they find the page through natural search.
  • Ariba interface in figure 3 has a single search box which retains the original keywords, in a manner similar to Google. Unfortunately, any keyword change drops all of the applied aspects and filters launching a new keyword-only search. This is obviously not very resourceful, as we are trying to retain as much of the query as possible for reasons explained above.
  • In contrast, Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb (IFB) provides a dedicated “New Search” button on the Home breadcrumb tile. As shown in Figure 10, clicking the “New Search” button removes all aspects and keywords, resetting the breadcrumb to the full-screen text box, reminding many evaluators of the simplicity of the Google search. Resetting is accomplished via an HTML layer or similar device so that the rest of the content on the page does not change . This way, the search box can reset almost instantaneously, perhaps even with an elegant animated transition.
  • Many faceted search interfaces like Overstock.com pictured in Figure 11, have two search boxes: one to “search within” the existing query, and one to start over with a new keyword-only search. Having two search boxes takes up precious screen real estate and increases the potential for confusion. Worse yet, the customer can not directly modify their keyword query after the search is executed, because the system converts all the keywords into an aspect which cannot be modified, only removed in its entirety.
  • Ben Shneiderman describes direct manipulation is one of the key HCI design principles. Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb (IFB) provides direct keyword query manipulation with the dynamic editable Keywords Aspect shown in Figure 12. At the start of a finding session, the search box starts out fully expanded across the entire width of the page. When the customer types in some keywords, they are retained in the search box for easy editing or keyword addition, as shown in Figure 12-A. If the customer selects one or more facets, they are always added according to their respective hierarchy in front of the search box. As more aspects are added, the keyword box gets progressively smaller, until it reaches some reasonable minimum size as shown in Figure 12-B. If sill more facets are applied at this point, a scroll arrow appears immediately after the Home facet, allowing customers to scroll only the applied aspects in the manner of a carousel control, without ever hiding the Home facet or the search box, as shown in Figure 12-C. IFB dynamic editable Keywords Aspect design proved to be very successful with our evaluators who found it intuitive, resourceful and easy to use.
  • Ben Shneiderman describes direct manipulation is one of the key HCI design principles. Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb (IFB) provides direct keyword query manipulation with the dynamic editable Keywords Aspect shown in Figure 12. At the start of a finding session, the search box starts out fully expanded across the entire width of the page. When the customer types in some keywords, they are retained in the search box for easy editing or keyword addition, as shown in Figure 12-A. If the customer selects one or more facets, they are always added according to their respective hierarchy in front of the search box. As more aspects are added, the keyword box gets progressively smaller, until it reaches some reasonable minimum size as shown in Figure 12-B. If sill more facets are applied at this point, a scroll arrow appears immediately after the Home facet, allowing customers to scroll only the applied aspects in the manner of a carousel control, without ever hiding the Home facet or the search box, as shown in Figure 12-C. IFB dynamic editable Keywords Aspect design proved to be very successful with our evaluators who found it intuitive, resourceful and easy to use.
  • Ben Shneiderman describes direct manipulation is one of the key HCI design principles. Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb (IFB) provides direct keyword query manipulation with the dynamic editable Keywords Aspect shown in Figure 12. At the start of a finding session, the search box starts out fully expanded across the entire width of the page. When the customer types in some keywords, they are retained in the search box for easy editing or keyword addition, as shown in Figure 12-A. If the customer selects one or more facets, they are always added according to their respective hierarchy in front of the search box. As more aspects are added, the keyword box gets progressively smaller, until it reaches some reasonable minimum size as shown in Figure 12-B. If sill more facets are applied at this point, a scroll arrow appears immediately after the Home facet, allowing customers to scroll only the applied aspects in the manner of a carousel control, without ever hiding the Home facet or the search box, as shown in Figure 12-C. IFB dynamic editable Keywords Aspect design proved to be very successful with our evaluators who found it intuitive, resourceful and easy to use.
  • Ben Shneiderman describes direct manipulation is one of the key HCI design principles. Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb (IFB) provides direct keyword query manipulation with the dynamic editable Keywords Aspect shown in Figure 12. At the start of a finding session, the search box starts out fully expanded across the entire width of the page. When the customer types in some keywords, they are retained in the search box for easy editing or keyword addition, as shown in Figure 12-A. If the customer selects one or more facets, they are always added according to their respective hierarchy in front of the search box. As more aspects are added, the keyword box gets progressively smaller, until it reaches some reasonable minimum size as shown in Figure 12-B. If sill more facets are applied at this point, a scroll arrow appears immediately after the Home facet, allowing customers to scroll only the applied aspects in the manner of a carousel control, without ever hiding the Home facet or the search box, as shown in Figure 12-C. IFB dynamic editable Keywords Aspect design proved to be very successful with our evaluators who found it intuitive, resourceful and easy to use.
  • Four Corners
  • Four Corners
  • How do we determine the hierarchy of Attributes? My research led me to believe that most people find it intuitive when the Attribute-Location breadcrumb simply replicates the order in which un-selected facets are presented (most typically in the left nav bar). Replicating the order in which un-selected facets appear also provides an effective way to integrate search and browse by treating the Category as just another Attribute in the breadcrumb. In vast majority of finding interfaces, Category appears first in the left nav bar, which places any applied “browse” Category Attributes in front of the applied faceted search values.

Design Caffeine For Search and Browse UI IASummit2010 Design Caffeine For Search and Browse UI IASummit2010 Presentation Transcript

  • Greg Nudelman Email: Greg@DesignCaffeine.com Twitter: @DesignCaffeine Design Caffeine for Search and Browse UI (a.k.a. Resourceful Finding UI )
  • Huh? Resourceful UI?
  • Resourceful: Able, capable, clever, creative, adventurous, enterprising, ingenious, intelligent, inventive, original, quick-witted, sharp, talented, etc. http://thesaurus.com/browse/resourceful
  • Resourceful UI System Capabilities Customer Goals
  • Start From Zero: No Search Results
    • Don’t Be Afraid to Say: I Did Not Understand
    • Focus on Providing a Way Out
    • Design from Zero
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  • Don’t Be Afraid to Say I Did Not Understand
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  • Focus on Providing a Way Out
    • Why do most Zero Search Results Pages
    • SUCK?
    • Effort and ingenuity invested in the Zero Search Results Page = overall dedication to customer success
    • Starting from Zero: focuses your team on the needs of the customer = deeper connection + tremendous competitive advantage
  • http:// http://beetlebabee.files.wordpress.com/2008/11/painting-the-roses-red-3.jpg
  • http://blogs.nyu.edu/blogs/val239/digiprodval/10_AliceInWonderlandLabyrinth.jpg
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  • http://img.thesun.co.uk/multimedia/archive/00853/SNN2537A-682_853019a.jpg
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  • Office Depot Faceted Search Redesign
    • Stick to your filter value-selection paradigm
    • Provide an obvious and consistent way to undo filter selection
    • Always make all filters easily available
    • Provide filter values that encompass all items, or the complete inventory
  • Drill-Down I want to narrow my search results to Department = Books Parallel Selection I want to narrow the search results to: Airline = American OR Delta OR … http://www.Amazon.com http://www.Kayak.com
  • http://www.OfficeDepot.com
  • ¾ oz. Bailey's Irish Cream ¾ oz. Lime Juice “… it's not so much the taste, but the consistency with this one. The lime juice makes the Bailey's curdle, turning into a booger-like consistency.” http://www.campussqueeze.com/post/The-Worst-Shots-Ever-Created.aspx Drill-Down Parallel Selection
  • [ ] All: Obvious Way to Undo Deselect-to-undo: ensure consistency in the filter value options http://www.Kayak.com http://www.Yelp.com
  • Office Depot UI is sensitive to the order in which a user deselects the check boxes for a single filter… Price filter option $50-$100 simply disappears if a user deselects it before the $50-$60 filter option (still only 2 items) http://www.OfficeDepot.com
  • Always Make All Filters Easily Available
  • http://www.OfficeDepot.com
  • http://www.Kayak.com
  • http://www.OfficeDepot.com
    • A red-hot poker will burn you if you hold it too long ;
    • If you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds;
    • If you drink much from a bottle marked "poison", it is almost certain to disagree with you, sooner or later ."
    Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
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  • What’s Next for Finding?
    • “ Browse and Search work best in tandem … the best finding interfaces achieve a balance , letting users move fluidly between browsing and searching” –Peter Morville
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  • Source: http://www.solarnavigator.net/mythology/frankenstein.htm
  • Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb
  • http://www.pactralink.com/global-search-icon.jpg
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  • Integrated Faceted Breadcrumb
    • Hierarchical Location-Attribute breadcrumbs
    • Change instead of Set-Remove-Set
    • Labels breadcrumb aspects
    • Intuitive new search
    • Direct keyword manipulation.
  • Why Breadcrumbs?
    • “ Breadcrumbs show people their current location relative to higher-level concepts , helping them understand where they are in relation to the rest of the site. Breadcrumbs afford one-click access to higher site levels and thus rescue users who parachute into very specific but inappropriate destinations through search or deep links. Breadcrumbs never cause problems in user testing… people… never misinterpret breadcrumb trails or have trouble operating them.” – Jared Spool
  • Breadcrumbs are Resourceful.
  • Location, Path & Attribute - Keith Instone
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    • “ This feels like having to turn off the radio every time I want to change the station”
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  • MA YA : Most Advanced Yet Acceptable
    • Faceted breadcrumb holds the promise to become the key component in the next generation of intuitive finding interfaces that fully integrate the best of faceted search and browse capabilities
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    • Faceted Search on Mobile
    • Limited Screen Real Estate
    • Lack of Filtering Options
    • Broken Flow
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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T85PfDfQc9Q
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  • http://findability.org/
  • http://www.srcf.ucam.org/cush/wp-content/uploads/2009/06/politburo.png
  • http://www.wikinomics.com/blog/uploads/if-you-cant-open-it.jpg
  • vs. http://www.amicofragile.org/wp-content/uploads/2008/11/linux_vs_apple_v2.jpeg http://i.zdnet.com/blogs/apple-ipad-official-02.jpg
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  • http://findability.org/
  • Educational Tech
  • http://mocoloco.com/art/upload/2007/10/the_moleskine_p/moleskine_whitejacket.jpg http://www.moleskinerie.com/images/moleskine-2004-06-22.jpg
  • http://www.ozoux.com/eclectic/archive/2007/02/20/images/2007/moleskine-reloaded.jpg/image_mini
  • http://findability.org/
  • http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/multimedia/downloads/sse_wp1_1280x1024.jpg
  • http://www.interactions.org/sgtw/2006/0712/images/hiv_tg_800.jpg
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
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  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • http://jimstips.com/wp-content/uploads/images/stories/iPodTouch/ipt_googlemaps_02.jpg
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/techsavvyagent
  • www.prisjakt.nu www.staples.com www.tripadvisor.com
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  • http://www.youtube.com/user/Apple?feature=pyv&ad=4586558836&kw=steve%20jobs%20keynote#p/u/6/Z03PR_4Ln90
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/Apple?feature=pyv&ad=4586558836&kw=steve%20jobs%20keynote#p/u/6/Z03PR_4Ln90
  • http://www.youtube.com/user/Apple?feature=pyv&ad=4586558836&kw=steve%20jobs%20keynote#p/u/6/Z03PR_4Ln90
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  • http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1933988495
  • Resourceful UI System Capabilities Customer Goals
  • http://static.arstechnica.com/ipad/apple_ipad_3g.jpg http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1933988495
  • Thank You! Greg Nudelman Email: [email_address] Twitter: @DesignCaffeine On the web: DesignCaffeine.com
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