Battle plan1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Battle plan1

on

  • 651 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
651
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
651
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft Word

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Battle plan1 Battle plan1 Document Transcript

    • Esperanza Charter School<br />ENI Battle Plan<br />Rachel Wolfson<br />ENI Increment 1<br />October 15 and 19, 2010<br />DATA REVIEW<br />List 3-5 standards on which your students demonstrated a high level of performance on this assessment:<br />READING:<br />Decode words using knowledge of base words, root words, and common prefixes and suffixes (ELA-1-E1) LAR030101 (76%).<br />Decode similar words (e.g., supper vs. super) using knowledge of basic syllabication rules (ELA-1-E1) LAR030102 (67%).<br />Determine meanings of unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies: Use of context clues (ELA-1-E1) LAR030106b (76%).<br />Demonstrate understanding of information in grade appropriate texts using a variety of strategies: Making predictions using information from texts; making simple inferences and drawing conclusions LAR030717b (52%).<br />MATH:<br />Use region and set models and symbols to represent, estimate, read, write and show understanding of fractions through tenths. (N-1-E) (N-2-E) LAM030103 (73%).<br />Match a data set to a graph, table, or chart and vice versa (D-2-E) LAM030542 (64%).<br />Model, read, and write place value in word, standard, and expanded form for numbers through 9999 (N-1-E) LAM030101 (50%) – this percentage is artificially low because it includes a wrong answer for all the free response answers.<br />List 3-5 standards that need to be re-taught to the entire class or almost the entire class.<br />READING:<br />Identify a variety of types of literature, including the myth and the legend, in [oral and] written responses (ELA-6-E2) LAR030615 (0%).<br />Alphabetize to the third letter (ELA-3-E5)LAR033035 (10%)<br />Explain the author's viewpoint using information from the text (ELA-7-E3) LAR030720 (10%).<br />Capitalize the first word in direct quotations and proper adjectives (e.g., American flag, Mexican food) (ELA-3-E2) LAR033030 (10%)<br />Write compositions of two or more paragraphs that are organized with: A central idea; a logical, sequential order; supporting details that develop ideas; transitional words within and between<br />paragraphs (ELA-2-E1) LAR032022 (14%)<br />List the individual students whose performance was poor across the board or almost across the board:<br />READING:<br />De’kunta Mason mastered 0 objectives out of 18.<br />Rashanik Pilot, Ty’maia Powell, Aaron Patterson, Victoria Porter, Josselin Reyes, AmariMarigny andIndia Byarsmastered 2-4 objectives out of 18.<br />Asianae Jones, Angie Zelaya, Chaszion Davis and Dakarai Williams mastered 5-6 objectives out of 18.<br />MATH:<br />Asianae Jones, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Nohelia Avila and India Byars mastered 1-2 objectives out of 14.<br />Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, AmariMarigny, Sharon Castellanos, Chaszion Davis, Kevin Salazar and Cristhian Castillo mastered 3-5 objectives out of 14.<br />List the standards that need to be re-taught to specific groups of students and list the groups:<br />READING:<br />Decode words using knowledge of base words, root words, and common prefixes and suffixes (ELA-1-E1)LAR030101 78%. India Byars, De’kunta Mason, Rashanik Pilot, Ty’maia Powell and Dakarai Williams<br />Decode similar words (e.g., supper vs. super) using knowledge of basic syllabication rules (ELA-1-E1)LAR03010270%. AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes and Angie Zelaya<br />Determine meanings of unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies: Use of context clues (ELA-1-E1)LAR030106b 78%. India Byars, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell<br />Demonstrate understanding of information in grade-appropriate texts using a variety of strategies: Making predictions using information from texts; making simple inferences and drawing conclusions about information in texts (ELA-7-E1)LAR030717b 48% India Byars, Cristhian Castillo, Chaszion Davis, Asianae Jones, De’kunta Mason, Yesenia Oro, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Pamela Rosa, Dakarai Williams<br />MATH:<br />Model, read, and write place value in word, standard, and expanded form for numbers through 9999 (N-1-E)LAM030101 48% Sharon Castellanos, Davis, Chaszion, Jenairo Harris, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, AngiaZelaya<br />Read, write, compare, and order whole numbers through 9999 using symbols (i.e., <, =, >) and models (N-1-E) (N-3-E)LAM030102 48%Nohelia Avila, Indian Byars, Sharon Castellanos, ZacharyaGage, AsianaeJones, De’kuntaMason, Aaron Patterson, Christopher Perry, Victoria Porter, Ty’maiaPowell, JosselinReyes, Kevin Salazar<br />Use region and set models and symbols to represent, estimate, read, write, and show understanding of fractions through tenths (N-1-E) (N-2-E)LAM030103 74% Nohelia Avila, Cristhian Castillo, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Kevin Salazar<br />Add and subtract numbers of 3 digits or less (N-6-E) (N-7-E)LAM030111 43% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Cristhian Castillo, Jenairo Harris, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Yesenia Oro, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Kevin Salazar<br />Read, describe, and organize a two-circle Venn diagram (D-1-E) (D-2-E)LAM030540 43% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Chaszion Davis, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Yesenia Oro, Aaron Patterson, Christopher Perry, Rashanik Pilot, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, Angie Zelaya<br />Match a data set to a graph, table, or chart and vice versa (D-2-E)LAM030542 65% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Asianae Jones, AmariMariny, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Josselin Reyes<br />Identify and model even and odd numbers with objects, pictures, and words (P-1-E)LAM030646 35% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Sharon Castellanos, Chaszion Davis, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, Pamela Rosa, Dakarai Williams, Angie Zelaya<br />REFLECTIONS ON THE DATA REVIEW:<br />As I looked over the ELA test, I found that there were two groups of students who performed poorly; some students were unable or unwilling to read the passages while other students should have been able to read the passage and they did not master the skill. To decide where students fell in those groups, I used my observations along with test data. Teaching the concepts to those students in the second group will be much easier than the first as the second group needs targeted help on a skill while the first group needs to improve their reading (whether or not they ACTUALY need help on the skill)<br />As I looked at the math test, I was able to easily spot issues that could simply be addressed in a whole class manor. I also noticed that the reading on the math section was a bit easier but it was still not easy enough for some of my lowest students. I still wonder if some answers were wrong because the concept is not taught or if there is a partial issue with reading the questions. As I observed them taking the test, I noted that students were misreading words in the test (not test words, regular words) and that when those words were essential, this impeded on their ability to comprehend and answer the question successfully.<br />PLAN FOR MOVING FORWARD:<br />Based on the data above, what teaching strategies should be changed, stopped, started or continued?<br />Changed/altered:<br />I will continue to do small groups during center time. I will change my lessons to be more rigorous and have our daily activities match the assessment more closely through aligning the way they look and how they ask the questions. We are also changing the way we use Trophies by jumping around in the book to match the story that we use to the skill that we are teaching. We are changing the way Ms. Castellanos works with the students and she will now be doing guided reading to help them improve in their reading.<br />Continued/expanded:<br />I will continue to use whole class instruction to help with the concepts and will also have the students who read on level practice the skills in our small groups.<br />Started: <br />Students will begin to be pulled for reading intervention during MAPS time either by a reading interventionist (when one is hired) or during ELA time. I will send her students that are close to proficiency and just need specific help to get them to be proficient. I will also send the MAPS teachers a copy of our scope and sequence and a list of the GLE’s that the whole class needs help with so they can incorporate that into their lessons.<br />Detail who will work with different groups, and when they will work with them.<br />Ms. Smith will be working with Manny Mason, Victoria Porter, Pamela Rosa, AmariMarigny and Rashanik Pilot during our ELA centers block from 9:00-10:00am. Ms. Castellanos will be working with Angie Zelaya, Sharon Castellanos and Josselin Reyes during our ELA centers block from 9:00-10:00am. Ms. Castellanos will be working with Valerie, who is a nonspeaker, 8:30-9:00am and providing her with activities to do during centers to help her in her English acquisition. The reading interventionist may be working with the small groups of students who are having trouble with mastering the skills and test taking but are on or close to reading level.<br />Detail how you will provide extended, additional learning opportunities to your students.<br />READING:<br />Decode words using knowledge of base words, root words, and common prefixes and suffixes (ELA-1-E1)LAR030101 78%. India Byars, De’kunta Mason, Rashanik Pilot, Ty’maia Powell and Dakarai Williams<br />Vocabulary Development<br />Goal: Explain the meanings of common prefixes and suffixes (ELA1.4)<br />Prefixes and suffixes should be thought of as a form of vocabulary. Like words, they have specific meanings but only when attached to actual words. Students must learn the meanings of the more common prefixes and suffixes if they are to be able to infer the meanings of new words that contain them.<br />Sample Activities<br />1. Whole-Group. The teacher introduces a small number of prefixes (e.g., un-) or suffixes and defines each. The teacher then supplies numerous examples of words containing these affixes (untie, undo, etc.). The teacher then supplies coined words that contain each affix plus a common root (e.g., unfreeze) and asks the students what the word means. (Although some prefixes, like most words, have more than one meaning, only the most common meanings are appropriate for third grade.) <br />2. Small-Group. The teacher prepares three sets of cards, one set containing prefixes, one containing root words, and one containing suffixes. (Roots requiring spelling changes to accommodate a suffix should be avoided.) The students explore various combinations of roots and affixes, in each case deciding whether the product is a real word or could be.<br />3. Independent. Given a list of affixed roots and a list of definitions that do not include the roots, the students must match words and definitions. For example, revisit might be matched with “to go back to a place for a second time.”<br />Decode similar words (e.g., supper vs. super) using knowledge of basic syllabication rules (ELA-1-E1)LAR030102 70%. AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes and Angie Zelaya<br />Word Recognition<br />Goal: Decode unknown words using knowledge of syllable types <br />Third graders must be able to decode all six basic types of syllables. These include (1) closed (e.g., cat), (2) open (e.g., me), (3) vowel-consonant-e (e.g., cake), (4) vowel team (e.g., teeth), (5) vowel-r (e.g., fur), and (6) consonant-le (e.g., apple). The first five types occur in both one-syllable and multisyllabic words, and students must be able to decode them in both instances.<br />Sample Activities<br />1. Whole-Group. The teacher chooses one of the six syllable types and prepares a list of one-syllable words of that type and a second list of two-syllable words. The teacher reviews the pronunciation of the one-syllable words and then asks the students to suggest similar words that can be added to the list. The teacher then moves to the two-syllable words and points out how the same idea is at work. (In the case of consonant-le words, there will, of course, be only the two-syllable word list.)<br />2. Small-Group. The teacher prepares cards containing two-syllable words that reflect one or two particular syllable types and that are likely to be unfamiliar (e.g., med-dle, de-cent). The children must pronounce each word, perhaps in a game format. (It is important that these words be real and not pseudo words.)<br />3. Independent. The student revisits a recent reading selection and lists ten words containing a particular syllable type.<br />Determine meanings of unfamiliar words using a variety of strategies: Use of context clues (ELA-1-E1)LAR030106b 78%. India Byars, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell<br />Vocabulary Development<br />Goal: Identify and explain words with multiple meanings (ELA1.3)<br />Nearly all words have more than a single meaning, and it is important for students to be aware of this fact and to determine the correct meaning on the basis of sentence contexts. <br />Sample Activities<br />1. Whole-Group. The teacher explains that most words have more than one meaning and that the sentence in which a word is found can help the reader determine which meaning is correct. The teacher then provides examples of pairs of sentences containing words with at least two familiar meanings (e.g., “There is a tree in our yard.” and “There are three feet in one yard”). The teacher models how context is used to determine the correct meaning. The teacher then presents additional examples, and the class analyzes them together.<br />2. Small-Group. During a read-aloud, the teacher pauses on occasion to ask the meaning of a word with two or more familiar meanings. In each instance, the teacher prompts the students to explain how they know. <br />3. Independent. The teacher presents the students with a list of words with at least two common meanings. The teacher instructs the students to write sentences in which each word is used twice, once for each meaning (e.g., “The bush in our yard is one yard high.”).<br />Demonstrate understanding of information in grade-appropriate texts using a variety of strategies: Making predictions using information from texts; making simple inferences and drawing conclusions about information in texts (ELA-7-E1)LAR030717b 48% India Byars, Cristhian Castillo, Chaszion Davis, Asianae Jones, De’kunta Mason, Yesenia Oro, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Pamela Rosa, Dakarai Williams<br />Comprehension<br />Goal: Use comprehension skills and strategies to understand complex text, including electronic text <br />By third grade, the texts children encounter grow increasingly sophisticated and require an array of skills and strategies for adequate comprehension. Students must be able to make reasonable predictions, arrive at logical inferences, note complex sequences, compare and contrast ideas, distinguish fact from opinion, and infer main ideas. They must also be able to form and answer questions about what is read and to make connections to experiences and background knowledge.<br />Sample Activities<br />1.Whole-Group. The teacher selects one of the strategies listed above and chooses a short text that affords an opportunity to apply it. The teacher conducts a read-aloud of the text and pauses at key points to illustrate the strategy by means of think-alouds. For example, to illustrate the process of making inferences, the teacher would pause and explain how facts from two sentences can be logically combined to arrive at a third fact that is not stated. Each think-aloud should include not only the process of the strategy but a reminder that proficient readers apply it.<br />2.Small-Group. As the teacher leads the students through a leveled book, a think-aloud is conducted to illustrate a selected strategy. Because the book may offer chances to apply additional strategies, more think-alouds might be appropriate as a means of reinforcing those introduced in whole-group settings.<br />3.Independent. Students are given a written task designed to require application of a particular strategy. For example, in the case of comparing and contrasting ideas or things, students might be asked to complete a Venn diagram after reading:<br />Idea 1Idea 2<br />The results of the written assignment provide a means of monitoring the extent to which the student can apply the strategy.<br />MATH:<br />Model, read, and write place value in word, standard, and expanded form for numbers through 9999 (N-1-E)LAM030101 48% Sharon Castellanos, Davis, Chaszion, Jenairo Harris, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, AngiaZelaya<br />Read, write, compare, and order whole numbers through 9999 using symbols (i.e., <, =, >) and models (N-1-E) (N-3-E)LAM030102 48% Nohelia Avila, Indian Byars, Sharon Castellanos, Zacharya Gage, Asianae Jones, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Christopher Perry, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, Kevin Salazar<br />Activity 2: The Largest Number Game (GLEs: 1, 2)<br />Materials List: number cards, base 10 blocks or paper models of base 10 blocks, number cubes, paper, pencil, place value chart<br />Give pairs of students a deck of number cards and have each student draw four cards. The purpose of the activity is to create and model the largest four-digit number with base 10 materials (i.e., base 10 blocks or paper models of base 10 blocks). Have students compare their numbers by comparing the base 10 block models and then “reading” them aloud to their partners. The student with the largest number keeps all eight cards played. Continue until all cards are used. <br />Variations: (1) Use number words instead of numerals on the cards. (2) Students can use place value charts with thousands, hundreds, tens, and ones labeled at the top of four columns to demonstrate their numbers before using the base 10 blocks to model the number. (3) On a paper with the students’ names printed at the top, have each student write his/her number in standard form under the name. In the middle, one student writes the correct sign for comparing the numbers (< or >). (4) Instead of using the highest number, use the lowest. (5) Use number cubes instead of cards. <br />Activity 3: How Do I Compare? (GLEs: 1, 2, 11, 13)<br />Materials List: calculator, paper, pencil, number cube<br />Have students complete an SQPL (view literacy strategy descriptions) by giving them the prompt, “It is always easier or faster to use the calculator.” SQPL stands for Student Questions for Purposeful Learning. A statement is made and students think of questions about the statement. Questions should be written on the board. Star questions asked by more than one student. Students should come up with questions and statements about this such as, Was it? Was mental math a good option for such large numbers? When did a calculator really help? Was it quicker to use mental math? Under what circumstances would using mental math be a good choice? a calculator? paper/pencil? Have pairs of students use a calculator to create a three-digit number using three different digits. Have them first to determine which number is larger by using their knowledge of place value. Next, ask students to write down their estimates of the difference between the two numbers. Before calculating the actual difference, each student will roll a number cube to determine his/her calculation method: 1 or 2 means the student must use mental math, 3 or 4 means a calculator must be used, and 5 or 6 means paper/pencil must be used. After the calculation method has been determined for each student, have students compare numbers (to determine how much larger one number is than the other) by subtracting the smaller number from the larger number using the pre-determined techniques. As students work through this activity they should refer back to the SQPL and record answers to their questions in a notebook. After the activity these answers can be used to review strategies and when it is best to use each one. <br />Variations: <br />1. Students add (instead of subtract) the numbers. <br />2. To practice calculator skills and writing numbers in different forms, have students in pairs use a calculator to create a four-digit number using four different digits. Ask students to trade calculators, with each student writing the number shown in word and/or expanded form.<br />Activity 4: Calculator Wipe-Out (GLEs: 1, 2)<br />Materials List: calculator, paper, pencil<br />Have students play Place Value Wipe-out with a calculator. Give students a four-digit number and select one of the digits to disappear. Have students subtract the value of that number. For example, 5,432 is the given number. The 4 must disappear and students must subtract 400. Continue calling out digits to disappear until 0 shows on the calculator. <br />Variation: Give the students a number (6,274) and tell the students to write the number in standard, word, and expanded form. Next, call out a digit to “disappear” (e.g., 7). Have students subtract 70 from the original number (using either mental math or paper/pencil) and write the resulting number (6,204) in standard, word, and expanded form. Continue in this way until they reach zero. Ask students why mental math might be a reliable strategy for this activity. (They are subtracting round numbers.)<br />Activity 5: Somewhere Between (GLEs: 2, 14)<br />Materials List: paper, pencil<br />Place students in groups of three. Have student 1 write a four-digit number, student 2 write a second four-digit number that is not consecutive, and student 3 write a number that is between the first two numbers. Have each student then write three statements using the numbers created and each of the inequality symbols (<, >, and ) at least once.<br />After the students have done this, have them create a story chain (view literacy strategy descriptions) using 4-digit numbers and the words “greater than,” “less than,” and “unequal.” Students can share their stories at the conclusion of the lesson as a review of <, >, and ≠. An example of a story chain might be as follows:<br />Student 1: I have 2, 453 buttons. My number of buttons is greater than (next student’s name goes here).<br />Student 2: I have 1, 987 buttons. I have less than (next student’s name goes here).<br />Student 3: I have 3, 643 buttons. This is unequal to the number of buttons (student’s name goes here) has. <br />Activity 6: Four-Digit < and > (GLEs: 1, 2, 14)<br />Materials List: paper, pencil<br />Have students work in pairs. Ask student 1 to write a four-digit number and the symbol < or > with student 2 completing the number sentence with a four-digit number. Continue the game with Student 2 listing the number and symbol and Student 1 completing the sentence. <br />Extension: Have Student 1 write a four-digit number and the equal sign (=). Student 2 then completes the number sentence by writing the number in words or in expanded form. <br />Use region and set models and symbols to represent, estimate, read, write, and show understanding of fractions through tenths (N-1-E) (N-2-E)LAM030103 74% Nohelia Avila, Cristhian Castillo, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Kevin Salazar<br />Activity 9: Fraction Students and Families (GLE: 3) <br />Materials List: paper, pencil<br />Choose 5 or 6 students to come to the front of the room. Have the class give fraction statements that are true for this group. For example, 2 out of 5 or of the students have blue shirts. Write the corresponding fraction on the board. Discuss that the denominator represents the number of students in the group (5) and the numerator (2) stands for the number of students with blue shirts on. <br />Continue eliciting fraction statements about the group. Record the statements on the board along with the fraction.<br />Draw stick figures of the group, being sure to embellish the characteristics stated (wears glasses, has short hair, boys, etc).<br />Continue the same procedure working with another group of students.<br />Then have students work in their own groups listing at least 4 fractional statements about their group. Have students draw stick figures, write statements, and fractional representations about their group and share with the class.<br />Extensions: Students could combine groups so that they are working with a larger number of members. Draw and then write fractions for the new groups. When sharing, be sure to talk about different representations for the same fraction. For example if of the groups are girls ask students if there is another way to represent ?( or ). <br />Activity 10: Parts of a Whole (GLE: 3) <br />Materials List: fraction pieces of various shapes <br />Have students use circular fraction pieces to model 1, , , , , , , and . Students will learn the values of these fractions by determining how many of the pieces, pieces, etc., it takes to make a whole. Ask students to use these models to compare the fractions (e.g., compare the piece with the piece to see which is larger, etc.). Vary the concrete models used so that students do not link the concepts to the traits or elements of any particular material. Extend this activity to other region model shapes (rectangles, squares, etc.) so that students do not think that fractions are always “round.” Also, make sure that the activity includes examples of fractional parts with numerators greater than one ( etc.). As an extension, have students go on a fraction hunt around home or the school finding examples of regional fractions (windows, door panels, patterned tiles, etc.). <br />Activity 11: Overhead Estimates (GLE: 3)<br />Materials List: overhead circular fraction pieces<br />Students need to engage in opportunities to estimate the size of fractional parts. Circular fraction pieces are the easiest for students to learn. Have students estimate the fraction that represents the shaded part of a circle displayed on the overhead. For example, display a circle with shaded and ask, “About what fractional part of the circle is shaded?” Repeat this using other circles having , , etc., shaded. Have students estimate the fraction that represents the size of the shaded part of the circle and write the fractions. Have students get a partner and become professor know-it-all (view literacy strategy descriptions). They go to the front of the room while other students display fractions for them to estimate. Pairs of students should be switched out after a few questions. Students asking the questions should hold the professor know-it-alls accountable for the correct answers. <br />Activity 12: Parts of Sets (GLE: 3)<br />Materials List: six-pack of soda, bunch of bananas, bag of red and green apples, packs of gum [5 sticks, 7 or 9 pieces], set of sharpened and unsharpened pencils, film pack with multiple rolls of film<br />Bring a six-pack of soda to class and remove one of the cans from the pack. Pretend to drink the can of soda and write the fraction on the board. Tell the students that this fraction shows what part of the six-pack you “drank.” Ask a student to read the fraction (one-sixth) and explain what it means (one of six parts). Ask questions like, What does the 6 refer to? What does the 1 refer to? What fraction can I write to show the fractional part of the six-pack that I didn’t drink? Continue the activity by removing another can and asking the same kinds of questions. Continue until all of the sodas are removed from the carton and the fractional representation for one whole ( ) is written on the board. <br />Follow these same procedures for other sets of objects (bunch of bananas, bag of red and green apples, packs of gum [5 sticks, 7 or 9 pieces], set of sharpened and unsharpened pencils, film pack with multiple rolls of film).<br />Activity 13: Colored Tile Fractions (GLE: 3)<br />Materials List: overhead color tiles, overhead, paper, pencil, attribute bears, lima beans sprayed two different colors, two colors of crayons <br />Place several (four to ten) tiles of two or more colors on the overhead. Have students determine and write the correct fraction represented by the red tiles, blue tiles, etc., in both words and in symbols. For example, if ten tiles are used and three tiles are red, then the correct fraction for the number of red tiles represented is “three-tenths” or . For the blue tiles, the fraction would be “seven-tenths” or . Encourage students through questioning to demonstrate an understanding of the concept by explaining what or means. Example of the understanding: There are 10 members in the set of tiles. If all 10 were red, then it could be said that the “whole” set of tiles is red. Since some of the tiles are blue, that isn’t true. Only some of the tiles are red. Three of the 10 tiles are red, so that means that 3 out of 10, or , are red. This activity can be repeated at different times using a different number of tiles (two to ten). This activity can also be adjusted to use other sets of two-colored objects (attribute bears, lima beans sprayed two different colors, two colors of crayons, etc.).<br />Add and subtract numbers of 3 digits or less (N-6-E) (N-7-E)LAM030111 43% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Cristhian Castillo, Jenairo Harris, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Yesenia Oro, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Kevin Salazar<br />This will be practiced every day with calendar math and the problem of the day.<br />Read, describe, and organize a two-circle Venn diagram (D-1-E) (D-2-E)LAM030540 43% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Chaszion Davis, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Yesenia Oro, Aaron Patterson, Christopher Perry, Rashanik Pilot, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, Angie Zelaya<br />Activity 3: What Have You “Venn” Doing? (GLEs: 39, 40)<br />Materials List: sticky notes, paper, pencil, chart paper or chalk/dry erase board<br />Write two statements on a Venn diagram with two overlapping circles on chart paper or the board. For example, use the categories “read a good book” and “went to a movie.” Have students place “sticky notes” with their first names in the region of the Venn diagram that reflects an activity they experienced this week. The intersection of the circles would, of course, contain the names of students who did both activities. Students that do not fit in either category should be placed outside the Venn diagram. Have students then take data collected and put it into a table and/or other graphic representation. Students can then complete a RAFT writing (view literacy strategy descriptions) assignment. RAFT writing can be used to reword, apply, and extend understandings. This form of writing gives students the freedom to project themselves into unique roles and to look at content from unique perspectives. Students should be given the following criteria for their writing. Tell students that they are a Venn diagram and that they are writing to a friend to tell about themselves. Use the following RAFT: <br />R-(Role): Role of Writer-They are a Venn diagram<br />A-(Audience): A friend<br />F-(Format): Letter<br />T-(Topic): Tell about yourself. Tell how you are divided and why.<br />Students can share writing with a partner as a review of the information and check each other’s writing for correctness.<br />Match a data set to a graph, table, or chart and vice versa (D-2-E)LAM030542 65% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Asianae Jones, AmariMariny, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Josselin Reyes<br />I will use the practice in the Coach, Ladders, and Buckle Down books to help students learn how to apply the skills they have at reading graphs, tables, charts, and data sets to matching them to each other.<br />Identify and model even and odd numbers with objects, pictures, and words (P-1-E)LAM030646 35% Nohelia Avila, India Byars, Sharon Castellanos, Chaszion Davis, Asianae Jones, AmariMarigny, De’kunta Mason, Aaron Patterson, Rashanik Pilot, Victoria Porter, Ty’maia Powell, Josselin Reyes, Pamela Rosa, Dakarai Williams, Angie Zelaya<br />This is being addressed daily in calendar math as review. Students are now not only able to identify odd and even numbers but also give examples of numbers that would be odd or even.<br />List the resources that you will use for re-teaching standards your students did not learn.<br />I will use manipulatives, Louisiana Pass, Buckle Down, Ladders and Coach to help re-teach the standards that students did not learn.<br />What other resources do you need to teach your students?<br />I need an overhead projector so I can model test taking strategies in both ELA and math, showing them how to break apart the passages and questions to see what they need to know to answer the questions. Having a subscription to Reading A-Z would also help in providing the students with more leveled books to help them improve their reading and to provide us with leveled practice so they can work on the skills. More paper would be helpful in preparing them so I could provide them with more chances to see the skills they are learning in a testing format. Being comfortable with the test is very important and having more paper will help that.<br />