The State of Corporate Social Media 2012

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"The State of Corporate Social Media" is a free briefing from Useful Social Media on how large companies are using social media, written by @gnjohnson. …

"The State of Corporate Social Media" is a free briefing from Useful Social Media on how large companies are using social media, written by @gnjohnson.

The 2012 edition features over 40 pages of stats, facts, benchmarks and analysis on how social media is impacting business.

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  • 1. Join the community on:Twitter: @usefulsocialFacebook: /usefulsocialmediaLinked in: linkd.in/USMgroupSign up for our corporate social media newsletterat www.usefulsocialmedia.comWritten byNick JohnsonFounder, Useful Social Media@gnjohnsonwww.usefulsocialmedia.comThe State ofCorporateSocial Media
  • 2. You can find us onAnd stay updated on all the latest corporate social media news and developmentsby signing up for our Tuesday Update at www.usefulsocialmedia.com@usefulsocial facebook.com/usefulsocialmedia linkd.in/USMgroupJoin the conversationwith leading corporatesocial media strategistsJoin us to:1 Discuss and debate practical social media issueswith large groups of knowledgeable peers2 Get exclusive content and earlyaccess to our briefingsand reports3 Receive special communitydiscounts and exclusiveson our productsUseful Social Media is building communities ofcorporate executives working in social media.
  • 3. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com2PageTableofcontentsForwardMethodologyWhat do corporate social media teams look like?Who owns corporate social media?What does your social media department do?Budgets for corporate social mediaSocial Media Metrics and MeasurementWorking with external service providers3491621262940
  • 4. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com3Since December 2009, Useful Social Media have been lucky enough towitness first-hand the explosion in corporate social media adoption.The growth of social media, and it’s consequent invasion of – initially, at least –corporate marketing departments, has signalled a fundamental shift in how corporationscommunicate with their stakeholders.For so long, the relationship was one of loudspeaker to mute crowd. A company boughtTV advertising, billboards, and radio slots to declare how wonderful and worthy of moneytheir product or service was.Consumers were expected to listen, not respond.No longer.The advent of social media has opened the lines of communication between producer andconsumer. Marketing is no longer a one-way street. Now everyone is talking to everyoneelse. Producers to consumers. Consumers to producers. Consumers to consumers(about producers).And now things are starting to spread. The incubation chamber of social media is hatchinga real revolution in corporate-consumer relations. Companies and consumers are bothstarting to ask:Why stop at marketing?Companies are realising social media can be leveraged for so much more than gettingmarketing messages across. And equally, consumers are realising than simply listening/responding to marketing messages is a missed opportunity, and does not leverage the fullpower that social media has given them.Customer service. Product development. Employee engagement. Crisis response.Social is beginning to be incorporated into every aspect of business.In this briefing we will look at the hard statistics that represent this revolution. We will lookat social media resourcing (financial and human), we will look at key social objectives andgoals, we’ll look at ROI and other metrics, key networks, and plans for the future.If you work on social media for big brands – or make it your business to understand howthese big brands approach social – then this 50 page document contains key stats, facts,analysis and trends that will ensure you take full advantage of this revolutionary shift in therelationship between businesses and their consumers. Read on, Nick Nick Johnson Founder Useful Social MediaForeword
  • 5. Get best practice on corporate social media direct from corporate leaders!The 3rd Annual Corporate Social Media SummitThe No 1 corporate-focused social media event –your One-Stop-Shop for everything you need knowFully embed social mediathroughout your company to engageconsumers, enhance your brandand boost your bottom lineTwo day business conference, June 13–14, 2012The New Yorker, New York Cityusefulsocialmedia.com/newyork Improve engagement, customersatisfaction and sales via a turbo-chargedexternal social media policy and make yourbrand friends for life Create a cohesive internal structurethat’s embedded throughout to boostcommunication whilst reducing business risk Measure your social impact to showbusiness worth, inform future strategyand meet your business priorities Lay the foundations for future successby fully understanding the changing marketissues to gain competitive advantageA practical and interactive business conference built for a corporate audience:#CSMNYJennifer WendtSocial Media Director, Schneider ElectricPerfectly targeted at the social marketerwith corporations – great examplesof corporate thought leadershipLori DeFurioSocial Media Manager, AdobeGreat content, great speakers.I will be able to use what I have learnthere immediately back in the office
  • 6. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com4About our respondentsParticipants were asked to complete our survey anonymously – working on the theory thatit will encourage a more honest response. This year, over 650 individuals responded to oursurvey – a six-fold increase on the 2011 version. Even this small fact bears testament tothe growing importance of social media to large businesses.The Useful Social Media audience tends to be relatively international, with an emphasis onthe UK and the East Coast of the USA. Our audience is made up predominantly of socialmedia practitioners within big brands and other companies, though there is a significantelement of our database hailing from the ‘service provider’ side.It’s important to get clarity on who is responding to the survey, before one can draw usefulconclusions from it. For this reason, we have often split out data in a few ways. Manycharts focus on data solely from the ‘corporate’ respondents to the survey.As well as this, we have often split out data to compare and contrast differences to twogroups – B2B and B2C respondents, and respondents from Europe and the USA.More information on our respondents can be found in the three charts below – coveringjob role, seniority, and geographical location.A comparison with 2011 to spot trendsThis is the second ‘State of Corporate Social Media’ report that we’ve produced. Weproduce the briefing on an annual basis, in the early part of the year – and conduct thesurvey itself across the last months of the preceding year.One of the strengths of an annual publication is the opportunity to compare and contrastresults over the twelve months, spot trends and identify changes. Throughout the report,we’ll be highlighting significant shifts for you.However - we’re not comparing all sets of data with 2011 results because this year’ssample is so much more extensive. An awful lot of small changes may well be down toa smaller sample size in 2011. Therefore we’re only going to highlight what look to besignificant shifts over the last twelve months.Methodology
  • 7. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com5What is the key focus of your role?[chart heading] What is the key focus of your role?  The most popular job title in our survey respondents was, as last year, marketing/communications. This isunsurprising – most companies tend to incorporate social media into marketing/communications teams, beforelooking (or being forced to look) at implementation within other departments.Interestingly, 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses on social – suggesting a growth inthe popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that of discrete social media departments.[chart heading] How senior are you?  Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter of our respondentswere of a Manager level.When compared with 2011, the first interesting shift becomes apparent. In 2011, only 33% of our respondentswere Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that number has swelled to an impressive 49%. Thiscould back an assertion that companies are beginning to treat social media as more important to their coregoals, and that direct exposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.13%  21%  9%  2%  2%  4%  15%  3%  31%  What  job  )tles  do  our  respondents  have?    Social  Marke3ng  Communica3ons  Community  Brand  Digital  Media  Web  None  of  the  above  9%  4%  18%  26%  4%  39%  Seniority  of  respondents  C-­‐suite  (chief,  CEO,  CIO,  CMO,  President)  Vice-­‐President  (VP,  Vice)  Director  (dir/head)  Manager  (mgr)  Execu3ve  (adm,  assistant,  officer  The most popular job title in our survey respondents was, as last year, marketing/communications. This is unsurprising – most companies tend to incorporate socialmedia into marketing/communications teams, before looking (or being forced to look) atimplementation within other departments.Interestingly, 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses on social –suggesting a growth in the popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that ofdiscrete social media departments.How senior are you?[chart heading] What is the key focus of your role?  The most popular job title in our survey respondents was, as last year, marketing/communications.unsurprising – most companies tend to incorporate social media into marketing/communications telooking (or being forced to look) at implementation within other departments.Interestingly, 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses on social – suggesting athe popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that of discrete social media departments.[chart heading] How senior are you?  Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter of our respowere of a Manager level.When compared with 2011, the first interesting shift becomes apparent. In 2011, only 33% of our rwere Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that number has swelled to an impressivecould back an assertion that companies are beginning to treat social media as more important to thgoals, and that direct exposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.13%  21%  9%  2%  2%  4%  15%  3%  31%  What  job  )tles  do  our  respondents  have?    Social  Marke3ngCommuniCommuniBrand  Digital  Media  Web  None  of  t9%  4%  18%  26%  4%  39%  Seniority  of  respondents  C-­‐suite  (chief,  CEO,  CIO,  CMO,  President)  Vice-­‐President  (VP,  Vice)  Director  (dir/head)  Manager  (mgr)  Execu3ve  (adm,  assistant,  officer  Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter ofour respondents were of a Manager level.When compared with 2011, the first interesting shift becomes apparent. In 2011, only33% of our respondents were Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that
  • 8. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com6number has swelled to an impressive 49%. This could back an assertion that companiesare beginning to treat social media as more important to their core goals, and that directexposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.In what part of the world are you located?[chart title] In what part of the world are you located?As is visible from the above, the respondents to this survey were truly global – though a majority come fromthe USA and Canada.Whilst this reflects our own area of operations, it is often assumed that the corporate social media adoptionrate is more advanced than in Europe. This chart would appear to lend credence to that argument – thoughother subsequent graphs and charts will be used to determine the viability of this statement.[chart title] Do you work for a ‘corporate’ (client side) or for a service provider (agency-side)[Moving forward – for all ‘general charts’ – those which weren’t produced in Word/Excel, like the onenext – can you just use the title on the chart itself as the [chart title], and remove the title text fromthe chart image?As is visible from the above, the respondents to this survey were truly global – though amajority come from the USA and Canada.Whilst this reflects our own area of operations, it is often assumed that the corporatesocial media adoption rate is more advanced than in Europe. This chart would appear tolend credence to that argument – though other subsequent graphs and charts will be usedto determine the viability of this statement.
  • 9. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com7Do you work for a ‘corporate’ (client side) or for a service provider (agency-side)A significant minority of respondents work in the service provider space, on the ‘agency side’.While this group is a critical one when it comes to social media adoption, the stated aim of this briefing is tolearn more about corporate approach to social media. For this reason, we will split out corporate responsesfrom those of service providers in several of the following chapters – to ensure a clear picture of the state ofsocial media in large business is built up.Do you work for a B2B or B2C businessThe largest group of respondents to the survey come from the B2C world. This is to be expected – the mostimmediate social media benefits tally most closely with B2C businesses – marketing to large groups,engagement on a large scale, generating a high volume of new leads.However, over half of all respondents also work in the B2B space, indicating a rapidly growing realisation thatsocial media is somewhat more complex than simply a large-scale marketing channel, and indeed offers morebenefits – like customer service, expertise sharing and deeper engagement.A significant minority of respondents work in the service provider space, on the ‘agency side’.While this group is a critical one when it comes to social media adoption, the stated aimof this briefing is to learn more about corporate approach to social media. For this reason,we will split out corporate responses from those of service providers in several of thefollowing chapters – to ensure a clear picture of the state of social media in large businessis built up.
  • 10. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com8The largest group of respondents to the survey come from the B2C world. This is tobe expected – the most immediate social media benefits tally most closely with B2Cbusinesses – marketing to large groups, engagement on a large scale, generating a highvolume of new leads.However, over half of all respondents also work in the B2B space, indicating a rapidlygrowing realisation that social media is somewhat more complex than simply a large-scalemarketing channel, and indeed offers more benefits – like customer service, expertisesharing and deeper engagement.
  • 11. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com9How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained prettymuch the same. A typical team would be of about one or two people working exclusivelyon social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners,one can begin to identify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or morepeople working exclusively on social media. In 2011, that figure was 22%.The initial reading of this would imply a lack of progress – indeed, a reversal – in socialadoption within business. However, there is an alternative view.What do corporate social mediateams look like?[CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Corporate only practitionersEUROPEAN CorporatesB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B Corporates
  • 12. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com10The ‘Hub and Spoke’ model of social media is often declared to be (see Solis) a moreadvanced step on the social media journey. In this model, companies build up a smallteam of social media practitioners (the hub), who influence, direct and assist individualswithin other departments around the business (spokes). The ‘spokes’ are there to executesocial media policy – which is often set by the hub.Before this, companies tended to have a less strategic structure – building up a largergroup of practitioners in one department who are there to ‘do everything’.We see the reduction in team size as a move towards a hub and spoke model – reducingthe number of people who work exclusively on social media to a core team of one or two,and then giving social responsibilities to others within the organisation as part of their coreresponsibilities.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsOnce we break down this data to focus exclusively on the differences between Europeanand US corporations, it becomes apparent that differences exist. One can conclude thatUS-based companies are more likely to have more people working exclusively on socialmedia than their European counterparts. Only 50% of Europeans have anyone workingfull-time on social, while the figure is 60% for US companies.This implies a continuation of last year’s trend of Europeans lagging behind UScorporations in social media adoption – though it’s worth pointing out that the gap seemsto have narrowed.When you look at the split between B2C and B2B businesses, the difference is far moreobvious. While only 48% of B2B companies have anyone working on social media full-time,a huge 69% of B2C companies do. As well as that, a full 40% of these B2C companieshave two or more people working on social, compared to 24% of B2B companies.Recently, Useful Social Media produced an article highlighting the top 5 companiesworking with social media today. Every featured company was drawn from the B2C world.Perhaps this lack of staffing goes some way to explain the poor showing for B2Bs.
  • 13. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com11How many members of staff engage with social media as part of their responsibilities?The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half ofcompanies don’t have anyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie92%) have at least one employee for whom social media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C,B2B, European or US data, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a keyresponsibility. It’s also worth noting that significant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2Brespondents) say six or more people in the company have social as a core part of theirrole.The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  Corporate only practitionersEUROPEAN CorporatesB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B Corporates
  • 14. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com12This helps us build up our picture of social media organisation within businesses. It seemsthat there is usually one, or perhaps two, executives working exclusively on social media.Below them is a larger team of two or three (or significantly more) for whom social is a keyuse of their time.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsThe picture built up by the former set of charts is backed by those from this dataset.While most companies from both sides of the Atlantic have two to three practitionersusing social part-time, once you get to bigger groups, the US again proves ahead ofEurope in adoption rates. A huge 46% of US-based companies have four or more peopleworking on social part-time, compared with 36% in Europe.The same is true when we break down the data by company-type. B2C adoption ratesappear to be ahead – with 42% of companies having more than 4 people working onsocial media as part of their responsibility, compared to 33% for B2B companies.It’s worth noting, for both of the above splits, however – that even though the numberof people working on social differ depending on whether a company is B2B or B2C,European or American, 92% of all companies have someone working on social as part oftheir responsibility. The question is certainly not whether social media is being adopted bybusinesses, but to what extent.
  • 15. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com13How many members of staff use social media in a professional capacity, but not as part of theirspecific responsibilities?This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 16. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com14This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spokeadoption throughout businesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more aboutthose people within companies who do use social media, and have had approval fromsenior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core part of their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over athird of all respondents say 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhapsfoolish for not adding higher options above 6+).One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of theirrole, and those who use social at work without clear management, shows a widespreadlack of oversight and strategic direction. There are many more people who use socialmedia ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who do so as part of a wider corporatestrategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporatestrategy, tie it to broader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout thebusiness.Is there a discrete social media team within your company?One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?From this dataset, one can confidently draw the conclusion (with the interesting exception of B2C businesses)43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?From this dataset, one can confidently draw the conclusion (with the interesting exception of B2C businesses)that most companies do not have a discrete social media department.43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 17. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com15From this dataset, one can confidently draw the conclusion (with the interesting exceptionof B2C businesses) that most companies do not have a discrete social media department.Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could drawtwo opposite conclusions1. That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumedinto the Marketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in thejourney to a more holistic corporate adoption2. That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embeddedthroughout key departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Mediapractitioner is not fully complete until embedding social has become so extensive thathis job is redundant. Do the responses above suggest these practitioners have beenalarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.
  • 18. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com16What department is your social media team a part of?The first observation one can sensibly make here is that corporate social media practitionersstill sit in the marketing team to a great extent. Over half of all respondents (exceptingthose from Europe) are responding while sat at a desk in the Marketing department.However, it’s important to note that this question asks about the locationof the team,not their key focus. There is nothing precluding these people sitting in marketing teams,but working on leveraging social for reputation management, for customer service, foremployee engagement and more. Indeed, some would say that the oft-chaotic growth ofWho owns corporate social media?Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could draw two oppositeconclusions1) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumed into theMarketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in the journey to a more holisticcorporate adoption2) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embedded throughoutkey departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Media practitioner is not fullycomplete until embedding social has become so extensive that his job is redundant. Do the responsesabove suggest these practitioners have been alarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.[chapter] Who owns corporate social media?[chart title] What department is your social media team a part of?20%  8%  57%  15%  Corporates  Only  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  7%  63%  10%  USA  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  5%  44%  31%  European  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  The first observation one can sensibly make here is that corporate social media practitioners still sit in themarketing team to a great extent. Over half of all respondents (excepting those from Europe) are respondingwhile sat at a desk in the Marketing department.However, it’s important to note that this question asks about the locationof the team, not their key focus.There is nothing precluding these people sitting in marketing teams, but working on leveraging social forreputation management, for customer service, for employee engagement and more. Indeed, some would saythat the oft-chaotic growth of social media within business means it’s likely this is the case.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsWhen we take a deeper dive, the most obvious point is that European corporations seem to have placed socialmedia experts in a greater variety of positions than their US counterparts. Only 44% of respondents in Europesit in marketing teams, compared to 63% in the USA.Does this indicate a more embedded and wider-reaching social media strategy in Europe than the USA?A surprising result is that 71% of B2B companies place their social media teams in the marketing department.29%  8%  59%  4%  B2C  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  21%  4%  71%  4%  B2B  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could draw two oppositeconclusions1) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumed into theMarketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in the journey to a more holisticcorporate adoption2) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embedded throughoutkey departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Media practitioner is not fullycomplete until embedding social has become so extensive that his job is redundant. Do the responsesabove suggest these practitioners have been alarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.[chapter] Who owns corporate social media?[chart title] What department is your social media team a part of?20%  8%  57%  15%  Corporates  Only  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  7%  63%  10%  USA  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  5%  44%  31%  European  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could draw two oppositeconclusions1) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumed into theMarketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in the journey to a more holisticcorporate adoption2) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embedded throughoutkey departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Media practitioner is not fullycomplete until embedding social has become so extensive that his job is redundant. Do the responsesabove suggest these practitioners have been alarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.[chapter] Who owns corporate social media?[chart title] What department is your social media team a part of?20%  8%  57%  15%  Corporates  Only  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  7%  63%  10%  USA  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  5%  44%  31%  European  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  The first observation one can sensibly make here is that corporate social media practitioners still sit in themarketing team to a great extent. Over half of all respondents (excepting those from Europe) are respondingwhile sat at a desk in the Marketing department.However, it’s important to note that this question asks about the locationof the team, not their key focus.There is nothing precluding these people sitting in marketing teams, but working on leveraging social forreputation management, for customer service, for employee engagement and more. Indeed, some would saythat the oft-chaotic growth of social media within business means it’s likely this is the case.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsWhen we take a deeper dive, the most obvious point is that European corporations seem to have placed socialmedia experts in a greater variety of positions than their US counterparts. Only 44% of respondents in Europesit in marketing teams, compared to 63% in the USA.Does this indicate a more embedded and wider-reaching social media strategy in Europe than the USA?A surprising result is that 71% of B2B companies place their social media teams in the marketing department.29%  8%  59%  4%  B2C  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  21%  4%  71%  4%  B2B  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 19. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com17social media within business means it’s likely this is the case.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsWhen we take a deeper dive, the most obvious point is that European corporationsseem to have placed social media experts in a greater variety of positions than their UScounterparts. Only 44% of respondents in Europe sit in marketing teams, compared to63% in the USA.Does this indicate a more embedded and wider-reaching social media strategy in Europethan the USA?A surprising result is that 71% of B2B companies place their social media teams in themarketing department. This is not only higher than their B2C counterparts, but significantlyhigher than the corporate average.Does this show a weakness of social for B2Bs – is it harder to use social media forcustomer service, for risk management, when you work in this area? With a smaller, buthigher value set of clients, perhaps B2Bs have reservations about social’s ability to dealwith complex consumer relationships and histories – and thus focus more closely onmarketing? Whereas B2C companies tend to have more simplistic engagement with themajority of their consumers, so can afford to shift more customer service delivery to asocial platform? This is a tempting conclusion to draw – though it’s important to note thatit’s not the only viable option.Perhaps the figures simply denotes that B2B companies are behind their B2C counterpartsin social adoption – that they haven’t moved on from placing the team in the marketingdepartment yet.
  • 20. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com18What level of seniority is the head of the social media team?This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important socialmedia is judged to be by large companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social mediateam’, the more important social is to that company.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression insocial’s importance to a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their socialmedia team has dropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directorsrunning social teams has risen, from 20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the twoyears are roughly the same.Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN CorporatesThis question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  
  • 21. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com19A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person headingup social at their company is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to59% in Europe. However, 10% of US companies responded that a VP heads the socialmedia department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, it seems that while the bulk ofEuropean and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard is againdrawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too closeto call. 57% of B2C respondents have a manager/exec in control of the social mediateam, compared to 53% of B2B companies. Both sectors have a 29% response rate forDirectors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2C audience, and 10% forB2Bs.Who does the social media team ultimately report to?[subhead]A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person heading up social at theircompany is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to 59% in Europe. However, 10% of UScompanies responded that a VP heads the social media department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, itseems that while the bulk of European and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard isagain drawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too close to call. 57% of B2Crespondents have a manager/exec in control of the social media team, compared to 53% of B2B companies.Both sectors have a 29% response rate for Directors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2Caudience, and 10% for B2Bs.[chart title] Who does the social media team ultimately report to?3%  14%  16%  48%  14%  5%  Corporates  Only  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  1%  12%  18%  57%  10%  2%   USA  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  5%  20%  10%  31%  26%  8%  European  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  [subhead]A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person heading up social at theircompany is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to 59% in Europe. However, 10% of UScompanies responded that a VP heads the social media department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, itseems that while the bulk of European and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard isagain drawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too close to call. 57% of B2Crespondents have a manager/exec in control of the social media team, compared to 53% of B2B companies.Both sectors have a 29% response rate for Directors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2Caudience, and 10% for B2Bs.[chart title] Who does the social media team ultimately report to?3%  14%  16%  48%  14%  5%  Corporates  Only  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  1%  12%  18%  57%  10%  2%   USA  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  5%  20%  10%  31%  26%  8%  European  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  This question was asked as a continuation of the previous – ie, how seriously is social taken by companies?This time, we see who the social media team ultimately reports to. Again, the rationale is that the more seniorthe person to report to, the more seriously social media is taken.Predictably perhaps, the most common response by some distance was a system of reporting to the Head ofMarketing. Social is still very much part of the marketing department’s domain.5%  6%  25%  54%  6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  2%  23%  9%  54%  4%  8%  B2B  Corporates   Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  This question was asked as a continuation of the previous – ie, how seriously is social taken by companies?This time, we see who the social media team ultimately reports to. Again, the rationale is that the more seniorthe person to report to, the more seriously social media is taken.Predictably perhaps, the most common response by some distance was a system of reporting to the Head ofMarketing. Social is still very much part of the marketing department’s domain.5%  6%  25%  54%  6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  2%  23%  9%  54%  4%  8%  B2B  Corporates   Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  [subhead]A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person heading up social at theircompany is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to 59% in Europe. However, 10% of UScompanies responded that a VP heads the social media department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, itseems that while the bulk of European and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard isagain drawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too close to call. 57% of B2Crespondents have a manager/exec in control of the social media team, compared to 53% of B2B companies.Both sectors have a 29% response rate for Directors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2Caudience, and 10% for B2Bs.[chart title] Who does the social media team ultimately report to?3%  14%  16%  48%  14%  5%  Corporates  Only  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  1%  12%  18%  57%  10%  2%   USA  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  5%  20%  10%  31%  26%  8%  European  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 22. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com20This question was asked as a continuation of the previous – ie, how seriously is socialtaken by companies? This time, we see who the social media team ultimately reports to.Again, the rationale is that the more senior the person to report to, the more seriouslysocial media is taken.Predictably perhaps, the most common response by some distance was a system of reportingto the Head of Marketing. Social is still very much part of the marketing department’s domain.Below that, the honours are shared between the Head of Comms, ‘other’, and, intriguingly,the CEO of the Company. 23% of B2B respondents report directly to the CEO. It’s aninteresting stat, and would seem to lend credence to the fact that B2Bs are not as farbehind their B2C counterparts as common knowledge suggests – at least in terms ofadoption, if not execution.A quick summary of key findings from the first two chapters• Social is still predominantly part of corporate marketing departments The vast majority of charts above seem to suggest that social media is still organised bypeople working in the marketing department. While there is evidence (and will continueto be, throughout the briefing) of social taking on a wider corporate significance, thediscipline is still very much rooted in the Marketing Dept – as was the case in 2011.• The Hub and Spoke model appears to be in place While it is true that the statistics could be used to draw other conclusions, viewing thesestats through a lens of commentary from people like Brian Solis allow us to use them tocorroborate the view that the Hub and Spoke model is being introduced to manage socialmedia across business. The typical team has typically one or two people working on socialfull time, with roughly double that having social goals as part of their key responsibilities,and then a significantly larger number using social as part of their professional life.• Where there is a vanguard, it tends to be based in the USA While statistics seem to suggest a narrowing of the adoption gap between US andEuropean corporates, once you look at thie ‘higher end’ results (ie 6+ people workingon social, Head of Department being a VP, etc) you’ll see that US companies tend tobe more developed than their European peers.• B2Bs still aiming at marketing – imply further behind (or structural difficulties) B2B and B2C companies tend to be pretty similar when it comes to team make-upand seniority. The biggest difference is where the team is located within the business– for B2Bs, the answer is resolutely as part of the marketing department. This couldmean one of two things: • That B2Bs are still at the very start of their journey, and are only using social formarketing (not customer service, risk management, etc) • That B2Bs are structuraly unable to focus social media anywhere but marketing –because of how they do business, social does not lend itself to customer servicefor higher value clients, or anything other than generating leads. Throughout therest of this report we’ll examine this hypothesis in further detail.
  • 23. Get best practice on corporate social media direct from corporate leaders!The 3rd Annual Corporate Social Media SummitThe No 1 corporate-focused social media event –your One-Stop-Shop for everything you need knowFully embed social mediathroughout your company to engageconsumers, enhance your brandand boost your bottom lineTwo day business conference, June 13–14, 2012The New Yorker, New York Cityusefulsocialmedia.com/newyork Improve engagement, customersatisfaction and sales via a turbo-chargedexternal social media policy and make yourbrand friends for life Create a cohesive internal structurethat’s embedded throughout to boostcommunication whilst reducing business risk Measure your social impact to showbusiness worth, inform future strategyand meet your business priorities Lay the foundations for future successby fully understanding the changing marketissues to gain competitive advantageA practical and interactive business conference built for a corporate audience:#CSMNYJennifer WendtSocial Media Director, Schneider ElectricPerfectly targeted at the social marketerwith corporations – great examplesof corporate thought leadershipLori DeFurioSocial Media Manager, AdobeGreat content, great speakers.I will be able to use what I have learnthere immediately back in the office
  • 24. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com21This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media managementused across the world, and within different business types. In this case, we will be lookingto find evidence to support a widespread adoption of hub and spoke. For this to be thecase, we would need to see a significant chunk of responses indicating that social mediateams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking, trainingand helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.In short, the statistics simply don’t say that. 62% of social media teams at corporationsare primarily responsible for executing strategy. Only 13% develop that strategy for othersto execute.This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%  6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  What does your social mediadepartment do?Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 25. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com22When you look at the USA, or at B2C corporations, the message is clearer – in this case,a huge 71% of respondents say they’re responsible for execution. Considering the teamis usually somewhere between 2 and 4 people in size – not all full time, they must beenormously overstretched.However, one can see that the second-most popular response (13% on average) isdefining that strategy for others – which fits with the hypothesis for a more progressive –and embedded - approach to social.B2B corporates spend more time planning strategy for others, and doing training. Thisseems to fit with a broader hypothesis that for B2B social media to work, one needsinvolvement from far more people throughout the company – you can’t rely simply on themarketing department, because proven B2B campaigns require thought leadership fromwithin the company to be shared with the outside world. It follows the social media team’srole will be to train up these people, rather than doing everything themselves.Even though in this question, only the most common activity was requested (obviously,social practitioners will do more than just one of the tasks above), it’s intriguing seeingthat so few people suggest that ‘tracking impact’ is their key focus. It suggests that plentyof companies are still at the “Throw a lot at the wall and see what sticks” approach, ratherthan an evolution of strategy based on proven returns.What are you currently using social media for at your company?In short, the statistics simply don’t say that. 62% of social media teams at corporations are primarilyresponsible for executing strategy. Only 13% develop that strategy for others to execute.When you look at the USA, or at B2C corporations, the message is clearer – in this case, a huge 71% ofrespondents say they’re responsible for execution. Considering the team is usually somewhere between 2 and4 people in size – not all full time, they must be enormously overstretched.However, one can see that the second-most popular response (13% on average) is defining that strategy forothers – which fits with the hypothesis for a more progressive – and embedded - approach to social.B2B corporates spend more time planning strategy for others, and doing training. This seems to fit with abroader hypothesis that for B2B social media to work, one needs involvement from far more people throughout thecompany – you can’t rely simply on the marketing department, because proven B2B campaigns require thoughtleadership from within the company to be shared with the outside world. It follows the social media team’s role willbe to train up these people, rather than doing everything themselves.Even though in this question, only the most common activity was requested (obviously, social practitioners willdo more than just one of the tasks above), it’s intriguing seeing that so few people suggest that ‘trackingimpact’ is their key focus. It suggests that plenty of companies are still at the “Throw a lot at the wall and seewhat sticks” approach, rather than an evolution of strategy based on proven returns.[chart title] What are you currently using social media for at your company?This is perhaps the most directly useful chart to our readership – giving, as it does, a clear picture oncorporate priorities on how social can be leveraged.Unsurprisingly, the leading responses are using social for communications and marketing. It chimes with ourearlier charts on team location, makeup and organisation.Following on from that, the most popular responses are using social for Reputation Monitoring, and thenCustomer Service. This seems to fit with our Hypothesis from the start of the briefing – that when a company‘dips their toe in the water’ to take advantage of social for some cheap and easy marketing, they areinvoluntarily dragged into a more holistic approach. Customer Service tends to be first on the list – oncepeople start using your marketing-oriented Twitter feed to complain about your products, corporates havelittle choice. Customer Service and Reputation Monitoring go hand in hand, and with the huge influx of0  50  100  150  200  250  300  Corporate  -­‐  only  NOW  12  MONTHS  This is perhaps the most directly useful chart to our readership – giving, as it does, a clearpicture on corporate priorities on how social can be leveraged.Unsurprisingly, the leading responses are using social for communications and marketing.It chimes with our earlier charts on team location, makeup and organisation.Following on from that, the most popular responses are using social for ReputationMonitoring, and then Customer Service. This seems to fit with our Hypothesis from thestart of the briefing – that when a company ‘dips their toe in the water’ to take advantageof social for some cheap and easy marketing, they are involuntarily dragged into a moreholistic approach. Customer Service tends to be first on the list – once people start usingCorporate only practitioners
  • 26. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com23your marketing-oriented Twitter feed to complain about your products, corporates havelittle choice. Customer Service and Reputation Monitoring go hand in hand, and with thehuge influx of granular data on corporate sentiment and consumer reaction, it is naturalthat this is also a popular utility of social.The next areas are crisis response (again, part of a triumvirate with customer service andreputation management), employee engagement, market research product developmentand then, bringing up the rear, social commerce. It is surprising, and perhaps worrying,that so few companies are leveraging the direct opportunity to make money throughsocial at this stage.What does the future hold?Looking twelve months into the future, corporates can see the landscape shifting in a fewkey areas:1. 200% more companies will use social to develop better products2. A third more companies will offer customer service delivery through social media3. 95% more companies will use social media for market research4. Social will become an even more important channel for marketing and communicationsmessage delivery and engagement5. Social commerce adoption will speed up (though from a low base)The first and third point bear witness to the fact that companies are beginning to leveragethe enormous amount of data generated by social media. Where once there were 8-personfocus groups, now there are 40m-person Facebook polls, and deep social media analyticstools.When separating European and US data, there are no real differences.granular data on corporate sentiment and consumer reaction, it is natural that this is also a popular utility ofsocial.The next areas are crisis response (again, part of a triumvirate with customer service and reputationmanagement), employee engagement, market research product development and then, bringing up the rear,social commerce. It is surprising, and perhaps worrying, that so few companies are leveraging the directopportunity to make money through social at this stage.[subhead]What does the future hold?Looking twelve months into the future, corporates can see the landscape shifting in a few key areas:1. 200% more companies will use social to develop better products2. A third more companies will offer customer service delivery through social media3. 95% more companies will use social media for market research4. Social will become an even more important channel for marketing and communications messagedelivery and engagement5. Social commerce adoption will speed up (though from a low base)The first and third point bear witness to the fact that companies are beginning to leverage the enormousamount of data generated by social media. Where once there were 8-person focus groups, now there are40m-person Facebook polls, and deep social media analytics tools.When separating European and US data, there are no real differences.0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  USA  Corporates  NOW   12  MONTHS  USA Corporates
  • 27. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com240  10  20  30  40  50  60  70  80  90  100  European  Corporates  NOW   12  MONTHS  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  B2C  Corporates  NOW   12  MONTHS  0  10  20  30  40  50  60  70  80  90  100  European  Corporates  NOW   12  MONTHS  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  B2C  Corporates  NOW   12  MONTHS  [not a heading, just bolded] Social media for B2Bs is far less focused on marketing andcommunications than the B2C flavourB2B social media is a more complex beast than the B2C alternative. While B2C social media is very muchdominated by communications and market, B2B is different. While marketing and communications still lead theway, customer service, market research and reputation monitoring are not far behind. As we have suggestedthroughout, B2B social media is markedly different to B2C, with different incentives for use, and a differentfocus.0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  B2B  Corporates  NOW   12  MONTHS  B2C CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 28. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com25Social media for B2Bs is far less focused on marketing and communications thanthe B2C flavourB2B social media is a more complex beast than the B2C alternative. While B2C socialmedia is very much dominated by communications and market, B2B is different. Whilemarketing and communications still lead the way, customer service, market research andreputation monitoring are not far behind. As we have suggested throughout, B2B socialmedia is markedly different to B2C, with different incentives for use, and a different focus.Where is there most change predicted over the next twelve months?Biggest areas for growth are:1. Product Development (from 16% of companies to 39%)2. Market Research (from 34% to 55%)3. Customer Service (from 42% to 58%)4. Social Commerce (from 12% to 27%)5. Employee Engagement (from 27% to 41%)
  • 29. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com26Will your budget for social media activity increase over 2012?There is still a very aggressive growth in social media budgets for large corporations.For 62% of companies to be increasing budgets on what is still, ultimately, an unprovenbusiness tool, in an uncertain economic time, shows a lot of confidence.However, when one compares responses to 2011, it seems that this growth is slowing. In2011, 77% of respondents said that social budgets would increase over the year. That’sa drop of nearly 20%. One explanation could be that over the last year, the bulk of hiring,of purchasing analytics technology and restructuring teams was done by 20% of ourrespondents – and now they are able to focus far more on getting ROI on the outlay.When one breaks down the figures, one can see that, as perhaps is expected, B2Bcompanies are less confident about social – only 58% plan to increase budgets, comparedto 70% of B2Cs.Budgets for corporate social mediaThere is still a very aggressive growth in social media budgets for large corporations. For 62% of companies tobe increasing budgets on what is still, ultimately, an unproven business tool, in an uncertain economic time,shows a lot of confidence.However, when one compares responses to 2011, it seems that this growth is slowing. In 2011, 77% ofrespondents said that social budgets would increase over the year. That’s a drop of nearly 20%. Oneexplanation could be that over the last year, the bulk of hiring, of purchasing analytics technology andrestructuring teams was done by 20% of our respondents – and now they are able to focus far more ongetting ROI on the outlay.When one breaks down the figures, one can see that, as perhaps is expected, B2B companies are lessconfident about social – only 58% plan to increase budgets, compared to 70% of B2Cs.62%  18%  20%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  Wont  say  64%  16%  20%  US  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  62%  19%  19%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  70%  15%  15%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  58%  24%  18%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  There is still a very aggressive growth in social media budgets for large corporations. For 62% of companies tobe increasing budgets on what is still, ultimately, an unproven business tool, in an uncertain economic time,shows a lot of confidence.However, when one compares responses to 2011, it seems that this growth is slowing. In 2011, 77% ofrespondents said that social budgets would increase over the year. That’s a drop of nearly 20%. Oneexplanation could be that over the last year, the bulk of hiring, of purchasing analytics technology andrestructuring teams was done by 20% of our respondents – and now they are able to focus far more ongetting ROI on the outlay.When one breaks down the figures, one can see that, as perhaps is expected, B2B companies are lessconfident about social – only 58% plan to increase budgets, compared to 70% of B2Cs.62%  18%  20%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  Wont  say  64%  16%  20%  US  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  62%  19%  19%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  70%  15%  15%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  58%  24%  18%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  There is still a very aggressive growth in social media budgets for large corporations. For 62% of companies tobe increasing budgets on what is still, ultimately, an unproven business tool, in an uncertain economic time,shows a lot of confidence.However, when one compares responses to 2011, it seems that this growth is slowing. In 2011, 77% ofrespondents said that social budgets would increase over the year. That’s a drop of nearly 20%. Oneexplanation could be that over the last year, the bulk of hiring, of purchasing analytics technology andrestructuring teams was done by 20% of our respondents – and now they are able to focus far more ongetting ROI on the outlay.When one breaks down the figures, one can see that, as perhaps is expected, B2B companies are lessconfident about social – only 58% plan to increase budgets, compared to 70% of B2Cs.62%  18%  20%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  Wont  say  64%  16%  20%  US  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  62%  19%  19%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  70%  15%  15%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  58%  24%  18%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  There is still a very aggressive growth in social media budgets for large corporations. For 62% of companies tobe increasing budgets on what is still, ultimately, an unproven business tool, in an uncertain economic time,shows a lot of confidence.However, when one compares responses to 2011, it seems that this growth is slowing. In 2011, 77% ofrespondents said that social budgets would increase over the year. That’s a drop of nearly 20%. Oneexplanation could be that over the last year, the bulk of hiring, of purchasing analytics technology andrestructuring teams was done by 20% of our respondents – and now they are able to focus far more ongetting ROI on the outlay.When one breaks down the figures, one can see that, as perhaps is expected, B2B companies are lessconfident about social – only 58% plan to increase budgets, compared to 70% of B2Cs.62%  18%  20%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  Wont  say  64%  16%  20%  US  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  62%  19%  19%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  70%  15%  15%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  58%  24%  18%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  There is still a very aggressive growth in social media budgets for large corporations. For 62% of companies tobe increasing budgets on what is still, ultimately, an unproven business tool, in an uncertain economic time,shows a lot of confidence.However, when one compares responses to 2011, it seems that this growth is slowing. In 2011, 77% ofrespondents said that social budgets would increase over the year. That’s a drop of nearly 20%. Oneexplanation could be that over the last year, the bulk of hiring, of purchasing analytics technology andrestructuring teams was done by 20% of our respondents – and now they are able to focus far more ongetting ROI on the outlay.When one breaks down the figures, one can see that, as perhaps is expected, B2B companies are lessconfident about social – only 58% plan to increase budgets, compared to 70% of B2Cs.62%  18%  20%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  Wont  say  64%  16%  20%  US  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  62%  19%  19%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  70%  15%  15%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  58%  24%  18%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  say  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 30. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com27Looking at the Europe/USA split, the figures are broadly the same. It’s another example ofthe common consensus that the US leads the way being rather off target.By how much will your social media budget increase over 2012?Going into a little more depth, and looking at the size of expected budget increases, thepicture becomes a little more complex. While a significant portion of our respondentsrefused to give detailed figures, those that are available suggest that the perceivedconfidence in budgetary increases is a little less solid than one would expect from theprevious chart.30% of respondents feel that budgets will increase by 10% or less this year, while only 8%can see a significant, 50%+ bump in budget size. Of course, these figures will be moreor less significant based on the initial budget size, but to ask that question would almostLooking at the Europe/USA split, the figures are broadly the same. It’s another example of the commonconsensus that the US leads the way being rather off target.[chart title]: By how much will your social media budget increase over 2012?Going into a little more depth, and looking at the size of expected budget increases, the picture becomes alittle more complex. While a significant portion of our respondents refused to give detailed figures, those thatare available suggest that the perceived confidence in budgetary increases is a little less solid than one wouldexpect from the previous chart.30% of respondents feel that budgets will increase by 10% or less this year, while only 8% can see a significant,50%+ bump in budget size. Of course, these figures will be more or less significant based on the initial budget42%  9%  21%  14%  6%  1%   1%  6%  Corporates  Only  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  7%  17%  13%  8%  1%  1%  8%  USA  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  35%  12%  27%  15%  6%  0%  1%   4%  European  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  34%  8%  26%  12%  8%  0%  3%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  11%  17%  16%  4%  1%  0%   6%  B2B  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  Looking at the Europe/USA split, the figures are broadly the same. It’s another example of the commonconsensus that the US leads the way being rather off target.[chart title]: By how much will your social media budget increase over 2012?Going into a little more depth, and looking at the size of expected budget increases, the picture becomes alittle more complex. While a significant portion of our respondents refused to give detailed figures, those thatare available suggest that the perceived confidence in budgetary increases is a little less solid than one wouldexpect from the previous chart.30% of respondents feel that budgets will increase by 10% or less this year, while only 8% can see a significant,50%+ bump in budget size. Of course, these figures will be more or less significant based on the initial budget42%  9%  21%  14%  6%  1%   1%  6%  Corporates  Only  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  7%  17%  13%  8%  1%  1%  8%  USA  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  35%  12%  27%  15%  6%  0%  1%   4%  European  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  34%  8%  26%  12%  8%  0%  3%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  11%  17%  16%  4%  1%  0%   6%  B2B  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  Looking at the Europe/USA split, the figures are broadly the same. It’s another example of the commonconsensus that the US leads the way being rather off target.[chart title]: By how much will your social media budget increase over 2012?Going into a little more depth, and looking at the size of expected budget increases, the picture becomes alittle more complex. While a significant portion of our respondents refused to give detailed figures, those thatare available suggest that the perceived confidence in budgetary increases is a little less solid than one wouldexpect from the previous chart.30% of respondents feel that budgets will increase by 10% or less this year, while only 8% can see a significant,50%+ bump in budget size. Of course, these figures will be more or less significant based on the initial budget42%  9%  21%  14%  6%  1%   1%  6%  Corporates  Only  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  7%  17%  13%  8%  1%  1%  8%  USA  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  35%  12%  27%  15%  6%  0%  1%   4%  European  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  34%  8%  26%  12%  8%  0%  3%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  11%  17%  16%  4%   1%  0%   6%  B2B  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  Looking at the Europe/USA split, the figures are broadly the same. It’s another example of the commonconsensus that the US leads the way being rather off target.[chart title]: By how much will your social media budget increase over 2012?Going into a little more depth, and looking at the size of expected budget increases, the picture becomes alittle more complex. While a significant portion of our respondents refused to give detailed figures, those thatare available suggest that the perceived confidence in budgetary increases is a little less solid than one wouldexpect from the previous chart.30% of respondents feel that budgets will increase by 10% or less this year, while only 8% can see a significant,50%+ bump in budget size. Of course, these figures will be more or less significant based on the initial budget42%  9%  21%  14%  6%  1%   1%  6%  Corporates  Only  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  7%  17%  13%  8%  1%  1%  8%  USA  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  35%  12%  27%  15%  6%  0%  1%   4%  European  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  34%  8%  26%  12%  8%  0%  3%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  11%  17%  16%  4%  1%  0%   6%  B2B  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  Looking at the Europe/USA split, the figures are broadly the same. It’s another example of the commonconsensus that the US leads the way being rather off target.[chart title]: By how much will your social media budget increase over 2012?Going into a little more depth, and looking at the size of expected budget increases, the picture becomes alittle more complex. While a significant portion of our respondents refused to give detailed figures, those thatare available suggest that the perceived confidence in budgetary increases is a little less solid than one wouldexpect from the previous chart.30% of respondents feel that budgets will increase by 10% or less this year, while only 8% can see a significant,50%+ bump in budget size. Of course, these figures will be more or less significant based on the initial budget42%  9%  21%  14%  6%  1%   1%  6%  Corporates  Only  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  7%  17%  13%  8%  1%  1%  8%  USA  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  35%  12%  27%  15%  6%  0%  1%   4%  European  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  34%  8%  26%  12%  8%  0%  3%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  45%  11%  17%  16%  4%  1%  0%   6%  B2B  Corporates  Wont  say  1  to  5%  6  to  10%  11  to  25%  26  to  50%  51  to  75%  76  to  100%  100%+  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 31. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com28certainly lead to charts with 90% of respondents choosing not to disclose, so resultswould be of limited use. There is still info one can glean from what we have.If we take the top, 50%+ growth as a category, one can see remarkably similarities acrossall our categories of businesses. US, European, B2B and B2C companies all hover aroundthe 6-8% mark. The most confident are, unsurprisingly, B2Cs – though even here thefigure is only 12%.Last year, there was no option for ‘Won’t Say’. After recalculating this year’s figures whenthat option is removed, one sees a remarkable year-on-year similarity. 50% of 2011respondents felt budgets would increase by 10% or less, compared to 45% this year.At the top end is the biggest discrepancy – 21% last year confident of a doubling (or more)of budgets, compared to 10% this time around. Again, this is consistent with a view that2012 is a year of consolidation, and of proving that social can deliver ROI.Measurement, metrics and provable return on investment are key for future social mediagrowth within businesses.
  • 32. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com29Are you able to link increased revenue to social media activity?An introduction to social media measurementMeasuring ‘return on investment’ in social is a constant challenge for the corporate socialmedia practitioner.‘Return’ means so many different things – from the CFO-pleasing revenue, to the SocialMedia Consultant-pleasing engagement.The proliferation of ‘alternatives’ to ROI do little but foul the pitch. There is no alternativeto finding the return on your investment. It is the key metric, and alternatives like ‘returnon engagement’ or ‘return on followers’ take a look at half the story and try to avoidpushing all the way down the funnel to the bottom line. They’re limited, and they will besuperceded as social metrics and measurement become more advanced.In the initial set of charts above, our respondents let us know whether they can do theSocial Media Metrics and MeasurementLast year, there was no option for ‘Won’t Say’. After recalculating this year’s figures when that option isremoved, one sees a remarkable year-on-year similarity. 50% of 2011 respondents felt budgets would increaseby 10% or less, compared to 45% this year.At the top end is the biggest discrepancy – 21% last year confident of a doubling (or more) of budgets,compared to 10% this time around. Again, this is consistent with a view that 2012 is a year of consolidation,and of proving that social can deliver ROI.Measurement, metrics and provable return on investment are key for future social media growth withinbusinesses.[Chapter Title] Social Media Metrics and Measurement[Chart title]Are you able to link increased revenue to social media activity?39%  61%  Corporate  only  Yes  No  35%  65%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  41%  59%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  [subhead] An introduction to social media measurementMeasuring ‘return on investment’ in social is a constant challenge for the corporate social media practitioner.‘Return’ means so many different things – from the CFO-pleasing revenue, to the Social Media Consultant-pleasing engagement.The proliferation of ‘alternatives’ to ROI do little but foul the pitch. There is no alternative to finding thereturn on your investment. It is the key metric, and alternatives like ‘return on engagement’ or ‘return onfollowers’ take a look at half the story and try to avoid pushing all the way down the funnel to the bottom line.They’re limited, and they will be superceded as social metrics and measurement become more advanced.In the initial set of charts above, our respondents let us know whether they can do the ultimate – track theimpact on revenue of social media activity.39% of corporate respondents are not only confident that this is possible (still a source of some debate) butthat they are doing it successfully. The briefing did not cover this question specifically in 2011, though we didask people whether they were confident in measuring social ROI. At that point, 45% said they were. Thefigures are similar, and indicate that tracking bottom-line impact of social activity is still a huge challenge for acorporate audience.Interestingly, while one can assume that social media practitioners are unable to show the Board direct38%  62%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  38%  62%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Last year, there was no option for ‘Won’t Say’. After recalculating this year’s figures when that option isremoved, one sees a remarkable year-on-year similarity. 50% of 2011 respondents felt budgets would increaseby 10% or less, compared to 45% this year.At the top end is the biggest discrepancy – 21% last year confident of a doubling (or more) of budgets,compared to 10% this time around. Again, this is consistent with a view that 2012 is a year of consolidation,and of proving that social can deliver ROI.Measurement, metrics and provable return on investment are key for future social media growth withinbusinesses.[Chapter Title] Social Media Metrics and Measurement[Chart title]Are you able to link increased revenue to social media activity?39%  61%  Corporate  only  Yes  No  35%  65%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  41%  59%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  Last year, there was no option for ‘Won’t Say’. After recalculating this year’s figures when that option isremoved, one sees a remarkable year-on-year similarity. 50% of 2011 respondents felt budgets would increaseby 10% or less, compared to 45% this year.At the top end is the biggest discrepancy – 21% last year confident of a doubling (or more) of budgets,compared to 10% this time around. Again, this is consistent with a view that 2012 is a year of consolidation,and of proving that social can deliver ROI.Measurement, metrics and provable return on investment are key for future social media growth withinbusinesses.[Chapter Title] Social Media Metrics and Measurement[Chart title]Are you able to link increased revenue to social media activity?39%  61%  Corporate  only  Yes  No  35%  65%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  41%  59%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  [subhead] An introduction to social media measurementMeasuring ‘return on investment’ in social is a constant challenge for the corporate social media practitioner.‘Return’ means so many different things – from the CFO-pleasing revenue, to the Social Media Consultant-pleasing engagement.The proliferation of ‘alternatives’ to ROI do little but foul the pitch. There is no alternative to finding thereturn on your investment. It is the key metric, and alternatives like ‘return on engagement’ or ‘return onfollowers’ take a look at half the story and try to avoid pushing all the way down the funnel to the bottom line.They’re limited, and they will be superceded as social metrics and measurement become more advanced.In the initial set of charts above, our respondents let us know whether they can do the ultimate – track theimpact on revenue of social media activity.39% of corporate respondents are not only confident that this is possible (still a source of some debate) butthat they are doing it successfully. The briefing did not cover this question specifically in 2011, though we didask people whether they were confident in measuring social ROI. At that point, 45% said they were. Thefigures are similar, and indicate that tracking bottom-line impact of social activity is still a huge challenge for acorporate audience.Interestingly, while one can assume that social media practitioners are unable to show the Board direct38%  62%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  38%  62%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 33. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com30ultimate – track the impact on revenue of social media activity.39% of corporate respondents are not only confident that this is possible (still a sourceof some debate) but that they are doing it successfully. The briefing did not cover thisquestion specifically in 2011, though we did ask people whether they were confidentin measuring social ROI. At that point, 45% said they were. The figures are similar, andindicate that tracking bottom-line impact of social activity is still a huge challenge for acorporate audience.Interestingly, while one can assume that social media practitioners are unable to showthe Board direct financial benefits of social activity, that same board are still happy toincrease budgets in the majority of cases, and resource a fundamental shift in howcompanies conduct themselves – both in marketing and various other areas. Is this anexample of long-term planning, and an awareness of the viability of other metrics? Or isit businesspeople getting caught up in the excitement of a technology they simply do notunderstand?Once one breaks down figures into specific groups, the first thing to note is the uniformityof responses. B2Bs, B2Cs and US corporates all have the exact same response as eachother – 38% confident of tracking revenue vs social activity. Europeans are the outliers– 41% confident – though the figures are not so different as to provoke much additionalthought.What social networks do you currently use on behalf of your company, or have a corporatepresence on?Unsurprisingly, Facebook and Twitter dominate the most popular networks – even at the expense ofblog.90% of respondents use Facebook for their company and 89% have a Twitter presence. These twoare the unrivalled leaders for companies – and an incredible proportion of businesses have taken theplunge and set up accounts here.Unsurprisingly, Facebook and Twitter dominate the most popular networks – even at theexpense of blog.
  • 34. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com3190% of respondents use Facebook for their company and 89% have a Twitter presence.These two are the unrivalled leaders for companies – and an incredible proportion ofbusinesses have taken the plunge and set up accounts here.Interestingly, corporate blogs seem to have become significantly less popular – onl 49%of companies now say they use one. Perhaps this is because the time investment on ablog is – realistically, whatever social media cheerleaders say about engagement – farmore than on a Twitter or Facebook account. Blogs require relatively long-form, originalcontent being produced frequently.Twitter and Facebook require more frequent engagement – but that engagement is oftenreactive, is often short-form, and can even just be links to other bits of content.YouTube and LinkedIn are very popular – ¾ of companies using them, too. I’ve brokendown the figures to show how B2C and B2B companies differ – and the results areinteresting:What social networks do you currently use and find useful?0  50  100  150  200  250  300  CORPORATE:  Which  social  networks  do  you  use  and  find  useful?  Social  networks  you  use   Most  useful  social  network  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  USA/Europe:  Which  social  networks  do  you  use  and  find  useful?  USA  Use   Europe  Use   USA  Find  Useful   Europe  Find  Useful  0  50  100  150  200  250  300  CORPORATE:  Which  social  networks  do  you  use  and  find  useful?  Social  networks  you  use   Most  useful  social  network  0  20  40  60  80  100  120  140  160  USA/Europe:  Which  social  networks  do  you  use  and  find  useful?  USA  Use   Europe  Use   USA  Find  Useful   Europe  Find  Useful  Corporate only practitionersUSA / EUROPE
  • 35. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com32Effective use of social media involves a decision – how thinly do you spread yourself? Which networks willwork for you, and which ones best fit your goals?From the chart above, it is obvious that the majority of companies find Facebook to be the most useful socialnetwork for them. Perhaps it’s unsurprising, considering Facebook’s vast reach – 845m monthly active users atthe last count, in December 2011.Following Facebook come Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn. When one compares actual usage compared to themost effective networks, it is apparent that the focus on Facebook and Twitter at least is justified. The mostpopular response to a question on the most useful network is Facebook, followed by Twitter, then YouTube,and then a corporate blog.It is interesting to note how far corporate blogging has fallen, both as a focus, and as a useful tool. Up untilrecently, a corporate blog was the gateway into a more active social media presence, but it appears its use hasbeen superseded by the increased utility and functionality of social networks proper.Surprisingly, considering the data for this briefing was compiled in December 2011, only three months after itspublic launch, Google+ heads up the chasing pack, along with photo-sharing site Flickr. Perhaps familiarity (G+is often criticised for its similarity in functionality to Facebook) has led to a higher adoption rate than would beexpected with a real departure from the ‘social network norm’.[subhead] A deeper diveWhen looking at a geographical split of the data, the most notable conclusion is that there is little difference inapproach on either side of the Atlantic. The one shift is that Europeans tend to find LinkedIn more useful thanAmericans, while people in the US find Facebook more effective than those based in Europe. Apart from that,there is little difference.When splitting into B2C and B2C groups, one would expect a more obvious set of differences – after all, socialmedia is used in markedly different ways by these two groups. That does prove to be the case – LinkedIn,enormously unsurprisingly, becomes pretty much the most popular network for B2B companies, and the mostuseful. For B2Cs, LinkedIn drops into the peleton, to borrow a phrase from cycling.0  20  40  60  80  100  120  B2C/B2B:  Which  social  networks  do  you  use  and  find  useful?  B2C  Use   B2B  Use   B2C  Find  Useful   B2B  Find  Useful  Effective use of social media involves a decision – how thinly do you spread yourself?Which networks will work for you, and which ones best fit your goals?From the chart above, it is obvious that the majority of companies find Facebook to be themost useful social network for them. Perhaps it’s unsurprising, considering Facebook’svast reach – 845m monthly active users at the last count, in December 2011.Following Facebook come Twitter, YouTube and LinkedIn. When one compares actualusage compared to the most effective networks, it is apparent that the focus on Facebookand Twitter at least is justified. The most popular response to a question on the mostuseful network is Facebook, followed by Twitter, then YouTube, and then a corporate blog.It is interesting to note how far corporate blogging has fallen, both as a focus, and as auseful tool. Up until recently, a corporate blog was the gateway into a more active socialmedia presence, but it appears its use has been superseded by the increased utility andfunctionality of social networks proper.Surprisingly, considering the data for this briefing was compiled in December 2011, onlythree months after its public launch, Google+ heads up the chasing pack, along withphoto-sharing site Flickr. Perhaps familiarity (G+ is often criticised for its similarity infunctionality to Facebook) has led to a higher adoption rate than would be expected witha real departure from the ‘social network norm’.A deeper diveWhen looking at a geographical split of the data, the most notable conclusion is that thereis little difference in approach on either side of the Atlantic. The one shift is that Europeanstend to find LinkedIn more useful than Americans, while people in the US find Facebookmore effective than those based in Europe. Apart from that, there is little difference.When splitting into B2C and B2C groups, one would expect a more obvious set ofdifferences – after all, social media is used in markedly different ways by these two groups.That does prove to be the case – LinkedIn, enormously unsurprisingly, becomes prettymuch the most popular network for B2B companies, and the most useful. For B2Cs,LinkedIn drops into the peleton, to borrow a phrase from cycling.B2C / B2B
  • 36. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com33The other notable difference is the continuing popularity of corporate blogs for B2Bs.Apart from that, the figures are roughly similar.We asked people why they made the choices they did – below are some of the moreinteresting and popular responses:• “That is where most of our target audience are”• “These are the only two we have developed yet. Next will be YouTube then Google+and blog• “Twitter sees the most activity for us and we are able to provide 24/7 customerservice here”• [Twitter is a ] great way of monitoring customer activity and engaging with them topromote our campaigns and deliver improved customer service”• “We see the most engagement on Twitter and Facebook”• “Push marketing to customers (Facebook/Twitter) and point them to appropriateresources (Twitter) when they enquire”• From a corporate perspective, [LinkedIn] is the most professional environment”• “Twitter is a great way to disseminate news fast. LinkedIn is brilliant for new businessleads”• “As we are B2B our members feel more comfortable in general in communicating viaLinkedIn rather than Facebook”• “We use each site for a specific need – LinkedIn is for recruiting new hires, Twitter totalk with our vendors, and Facebook to communicate with our customers”• “Video is powerful, and our demos show things that would be impossible to conveyin another medium [other than YouTube]”• “Facebook has the most overall engagement and relationship with fans, as LinkedInhas made improvements with this for Company Pages we expect to see both beingimportant for overall strategy”• “With a blog, you own the platform and do not have to worry about Terms of Servicechanges or other changes to the platform”
  • 37. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com34Is social media becoming a more important part of your marketing strategy?There is not an awful lot to say about this chart, apart from the fact that it is beyond doubt that social isbecoming a more important part of corporate marketing strategies. It’s worth pointing out that the pace ofchange is increasing, too. Last year, 89% said social was increasing in importance – we’re up to 93% now.There is not an awful lot to say about this chart, apart from the fact that it is beyond doubtthat social is becoming a more important part of corporate marketing strategies. It’s worthpointing out that the pace of change is increasing, too. Last year, 89% said social wasincreasing in importance – we’re up to 93% now.
  • 38. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com35Do you feel confident that you’re accurately measuring the impact of your social mediaactivity?[chart title]Do you feel confident that you’re accurately measuring the impact of your socialmedia activity?[chart title]Do you measure the ROI of your social media activity?[chart title]Are you confident that you get the measurement of social ROI correct?32%  68%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  40%  60%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Do you measure the ROI of your social media activity?[chart title]Do you feel confident that you’re accurately measuring the impact of your socialmedia activity?[chart title]Do you measure the ROI of your social media activity?[chart title]Are you confident that you get the measurement of social ROI correct?32%  68%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  40%  60%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Corporate only practitionersCorporate only practitioners
  • 39. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com36Are you confident that you get the measurement of social ROI correct?Less than a third or respondents feel that they are accurately measuring the impact of their social mediaactivity, and only 40% of respondents say they measure social media ROI (with only 23% confident they’regetting this measurement correct). There is certainly much that needs to be done when it comes to socialmedia measurement for large businesses.Perhaps more worryingly, there has been no real shift since 2011, when 40% of respondents said they wereconfident they were measuring social media impact. The pressure on social media practitioners to showconcrete results and impact is increasing – the board want to see a return on their investment. Yet littleprogress has been made in tracking this impact. Perhaps this explains the slowing of social media investmentand budgeting.[chart title:] What key performance indicators do you use?77%  23%  Corporates  only  No  Yes  Less than a third or respondents feel that they are accurately measuring the impact oftheir social media activity, and only 40% of respondents say they measure social mediaROI (with only 23% confident they’re getting this measurement correct). There is certainlymuch that needs to be done when it comes to social media measurement for largebusinesses.Perhaps more worryingly, there has been no real shift since 2011, when 40% ofrespondents said they were confident they were measuring social media impact. Thepressure on social media practitioners to show concrete results and impact is increasing– the board want to see a return on their investment. Yet little progress has been madein tracking this impact. Perhaps this explains the slowing of social media investment andbudgeting.Corporate only practitioners
  • 40. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com37What key performance indicators do you use?When one looks at the key performance indicators that brands use to track impact, it becomes clear whythere is still such confusion over social media impact tracking.First place goes to ‘web traffic’, which is frankly too simplistic a measure to say many meaningful things aboutsocial media impact and it is worrying that it retains such an important place in corporate social media impactassessment.An increase in followers of social accounts (second place) is a marginally more useful metric, but has its limits,too. One could have 1,000,000 followers, but if all are either irrelevant to a brand’s product, or have noengagement with said brand, there is little benefit.It is only when we get down to third place that we find a truly social metric – engagement. For engagement tobe languishing in third place after several years of corporate social media activity is deeply disturbing.After these three metrics, we get a significant drop off before we come to the next set of metrics - which areadmittedly harder (but still eminently possible) to measure, but immeasurably more useful. Conversion to salesand conversion to leads. For corporate social media impact assessment to improve, the industry must see anincrease in the use of these more fitting metrics.[chart title:] What are the most useful metrics for you?0.0%  2.0%  4.0%  6.0%  8.0%  10.0%  12.0%  14.0%  16.0%  18.0%  20.0%  What  KPIs  do  you  use?  When one looks at the key performance indicators that brands use to track impact, itbecomes clear why there is still such confusion over social media impact tracking.First place goes to ‘web traffic’, which is frankly too simplistic a measure to say manymeaningful things about social media impact and it is worrying that it retains such animportant place in corporate social media impact assessment.An increase in followers of social accounts (second place) is a marginally more usefulmetric, but has its limits, too. One could have 1,000,000 followers, but if all are eitherirrelevant to a brand’s product, or have no engagement with said brand, there is littlebenefit.It is only when we get down to third place that we find a truly social metric – engagement.For engagement to be languishing in third place after several years of corporate socialmedia activity is deeply disturbing.After these three metrics, we get a significant drop off before we come to the next setof metrics - which are admittedly harder (but still eminently possible) to measure, butimmeasurably more useful. Conversion to sales and conversion to leads. For corporatesocial media impact assessment to improve, the industry must see an increase in the useof these more fitting metrics.
  • 41. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com38What are the most useful metrics for you?Looking at those metrics that companies find most useful, the picture becomes more interesting. It turns outthat while the metrics being used leave a little to be desired – practitioners are aware that the situation isunsatisfactory, and understand which are the more relevant – and useful metrics. The biggest discrepanciesbetween what is being tracked and what should be tracked are:1) Activity/Engagement – from 14% to 38% - 24%2) Conversion to sales – from 7% to 30% - 23%3) Conversion to leads – from 6% to 28% - 22%4) Evangelists – from 2% to 21% - 19%5) Active vs Inactive – 6% to 23% - 17%You can see that the biggest shift is towards far more representative social media metrics. Too often peopleare relying on standard metrics ill-fitted to social media impact assessment.The most popular metrics people want to use moving forward are:1) Activity2) Increase in followers3) Conversion to sales4) Web traffic5) Conversion to leadsThe presence of increase in followers and web traffic show that there is still a little way to go – and perhapsreflects a lack of confidence in the alternatives – or the increasing oversight of a board who care more aboutabsolute numbers and metrics they understand.0%  10%  20%  30%  40%  50%  60%  70%  web  traffic  3me  spent  on  site  sharing  share  of  conversa3on  vs  Sen3ment  Sa3sfac3on  Revenue  (per  follower)  Reach  Other  Klout  Increase  in  followers/fans  Conversion  to  sales  Conversion  to  leads  Ac3vity/Engagement  %  of  ac3ve  members  #  of  evangelists  Frequency  of  Response  Metric  Which  are  the  most  useful  metrics  for  you?  All  Corpora3ons  US-­‐based  corpora3ons  European  corpora3ons  B2C  Corpora3ons  B2B  Corpora3ons  Looking at those metrics that companies find most useful, the picture becomes moreinteresting. It turns out that while the metrics being used leave a little to be desired –practitioners are aware that the situation is unsatisfactory, and understand which are themore relevant – and useful metrics. The biggest discrepancies between what is beingtracked and what should be tracked are:1. Activity/Engagement – from 14% to 38% - 24%2. Conversion to sales – from 7% to 30% - 23%3. Conversion to leads – from 6% to 28% - 22%4. Evangelists – from 2% to 21% - 19%5. Active vs Inactive – 6% to 23% - 17%You can see that the biggest shift is towards far more representative social mediametrics. Too often people are relying on standard metrics ill-fitted to social media impactassessment.The most popular metrics people want to use moving forward are:1. Activity2. Increase in followers3. Conversion to sales4. Web traffic5. Conversion to leadsThe presence of increase in followers and web traffic show that there is still a little wayto go – and perhaps reflects a lack of confidence in the alternatives – or the increasing
  • 42. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com39oversight of a board who care more about absolute numbers and metrics they understand.Do you think new metrics need to be developed to track social media impact?[chart title] Do you think new metrics need to be developed to track social media impact?Rather  unsurprisingly,  the  response  on  this  chart  is  rather  emphatic.  79%  of  corporate  respondents  feel  that  social  media  metrics  currently  available  are  insufficient  to  track  social  media  impact.79%  21%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Rather unsurprisingly, the response on this chart is rather emphatic. 79% of corporaterespondents feel that social media metrics currently available are insufficient to tracksocial media impact.Corporate only practitioners
  • 43. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com40Do you pay any external organisation for advice/assistance with your social media presence?Only 40% of companies now admit to paying external agencies for assistance with theirsocial media presence. Ovwer half of companies keep the whole process in house –which perhaps reflects a burgeoning familiarity with, and confidence in, brand socialmedia management.When you break down the figures, there is one incredible statistic – that a huge 80% ofB2C corporates do still use external agencies for help with their social media presence.This is in marked contrast to B2Bs (only 16%) and also to European and US splits (41%and 31% respectively).Working with external service providers[Chapter] Working with external service providers[chart title] Do you pay any external organisation for advice/assistance with your social mediapresence?39%  54%  7%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Wont  Say  41%  52%  7%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  31%  62%  7%  European  corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  80%  11%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  16%  76%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  [Chapter] Working with external service providers[chart title] Do you pay any external organisation for advice/assistance with your social mediapresence?39%  54%  7%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Wont  Say  41%  52%  7%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  31%  62%  7%  European  corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  80%  11%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  16%  76%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  [Chapter] Working with external service providers[chart title] Do you pay any external organisation for advice/assistance with your social mediapresence?39%  54%  7%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Wont  Say  41%  52%  7%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  31%  62%  7%  European  corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  80%  11%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  16%  76%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  [Chapter] Working with external service providers[chart title] Do you pay any external organisation for advice/assistance with your social mediapresence?39%  54%  7%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Wont  Say  41%  52%  7%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  31%  62%  7%  European  corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  80%  11%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  16%  76%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  [Chapter] Working with external service providers[chart title] Do you pay any external organisation for advice/assistance with your social mediapresence?39%  54%  7%  Corporates  only  Yes  No  Wont  Say  41%  52%  7%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  31%  62%  7%  European  corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  80%  11%  9%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  16%  76%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Wont  Say  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  • 44. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com41Perhaps this again lends fuel to the fire that says that B2B social media, while being lesswidespread, is actually more advanced and complex than the B2C variety? B2Cs are stillincredibly reliant on external providers, whereas a huge 76% of B2B respondents areconfident enough in their own abilities to work independently and without consultancy or‘gurus’ to get their social media strategy working.• 43% of companies paid external organisations for advice with their social mediacampaigns. Now that figure is 28%• Shows an increasing confidence for the in-house team, and bad sign for serviceproviders!
  • 45. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com42Are your social media communications written and sent out by internal members of staff, orexternal agencies?As before, it looks like B2C companies are far more reliant on external expertise to run theirsocial media strategy than their B2B counterparts. A full 30% of B2C brand messages areactually sent out by external agencies. Only 9% of B2B companies allow this to happen.Considering the importance of authenticity, control over brand message – and the riskswhen things go wrong – it’s disappointing that a third of B2Cs still do not control their ownsocial media presences.Again, this lends weight to the argument that B2B companies – while there are less ofthem on social media, and more caution about potential than their B2C counterparts – areactually further down the road to a holistic strategy that leverages the many opportunitiesthat social offers.Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN CorporatesOnly 40% of companies now admit to paying external agencies for assistance with their social media presence.Ovwer half of companies keep the whole process in house – which perhaps reflects a burgeoning familiaritywith, and confidence in, brand social media management.When you break down the figures, there is one incredible statistic – that a huge 80% of B2C corporates dostill use external agencies for help with their social media presence. This is in marked contrast to B2Bs (only16%) and also to European and US splits (41% and 31% respectively).Perhaps this again lends fuel to the fire that says that B2B social media, while being less widespread, is actuallymore advanced and complex than the B2C variety? B2Cs are still incredibly reliant on external providers,whereas a huge 76% of B2B respondents are confident enough in their own abilities to work independentlyand without consultancy or ‘gurus’ to get their social media strategy working.• 43% of companies paid external organisations for advice with their social media campaigns. Now thatfigure is 28%• Shows an increasing confidence for the in-house team, and bad sign for service providers![chart title] Are your social media communications written and sent out by internal members ofstaff, or external agencies?84%  6%  10%  Corporates  only  Internal  External  Rather  Not  86%  6%  8%  USA  Corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not   86%  2%  12%  European  corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not  As before, it looks like B2C companies are far more reliant on external expertise to run their social mediastrategy than their B2B counterparts. A full 30% of B2C brand messages are actually sent out by externalagencies. Only 9% of B2B companies allow this to happen.Considering the importance of authenticity, control over brand message – and the risks when things go wrong– it’s disappointing that a third of B2Cs still do not control their own social media presences.Again, this lends weight to the argument that B2B companies – while there are less of them on social media,and more caution about potential than their B2C counterparts – are actually further down the road to aholistic strategy that leverages the many opportunities that social offers.70%  30%  0%  B2C  Corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not  90%  9%   1%  B2B  Corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not  Only 40% of companies now admit to paying external agencies for assistance with their social media presence.Ovwer half of companies keep the whole process in house – which perhaps reflects a burgeoning familiaritywith, and confidence in, brand social media management.When you break down the figures, there is one incredible statistic – that a huge 80% of B2C corporates dostill use external agencies for help with their social media presence. This is in marked contrast to B2Bs (only16%) and also to European and US splits (41% and 31% respectively).Perhaps this again lends fuel to the fire that says that B2B social media, while being less widespread, is actuallymore advanced and complex than the B2C variety? B2Cs are still incredibly reliant on external providers,whereas a huge 76% of B2B respondents are confident enough in their own abilities to work independentlyand without consultancy or ‘gurus’ to get their social media strategy working.• 43% of companies paid external organisations for advice with their social media campaigns. Now thatfigure is 28%• Shows an increasing confidence for the in-house team, and bad sign for service providers![chart title] Are your social media communications written and sent out by internal members ofstaff, or external agencies?84%  6%  10%  Corporates  only  Internal  External  Rather  Not  86%  6%  8%  USA  Corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not   86%  2%  12%  European  corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not  Only 40% of companies now admit to paying external agencies for assistance with their social media presence.Ovwer half of companies keep the whole process in house – which perhaps reflects a burgeoning familiaritywith, and confidence in, brand social media management.When you break down the figures, there is one incredible statistic – that a huge 80% of B2C corporates dostill use external agencies for help with their social media presence. This is in marked contrast to B2Bs (only16%) and also to European and US splits (41% and 31% respectively).Perhaps this again lends fuel to the fire that says that B2B social media, while being less widespread, is actuallymore advanced and complex than the B2C variety? B2Cs are still incredibly reliant on external providers,whereas a huge 76% of B2B respondents are confident enough in their own abilities to work independentlyand without consultancy or ‘gurus’ to get their social media strategy working.• 43% of companies paid external organisations for advice with their social media campaigns. Now thatfigure is 28%• Shows an increasing confidence for the in-house team, and bad sign for service providers![chart title] Are your social media communications written and sent out by internal members ofstaff, or external agencies?84%  6%  10%  Corporates  only  Internal  External  Rather  Not  86%  6%  8%  USA  Corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not   86%  2%  12%  European  corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not  As before, it looks like B2C companies are far more reliant on external expertise to run their social mediastrategy than their B2B counterparts. A full 30% of B2C brand messages are actually sent out by externalagencies. Only 9% of B2B companies allow this to happen.Considering the importance of authenticity, control over brand message – and the risks when things go wrong– it’s disappointing that a third of B2Cs still do not control their own social media presences.Again, this lends weight to the argument that B2B companies – while there are less of them on social media,and more caution about potential than their B2C counterparts – are actually further down the road to aholistic strategy that leverages the many opportunities that social offers.70%  30%  0%  B2C  Corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not  90%  9%   1%  B2B  Corporates  Internal  External  Rather  Not  
  • 46. Get best practice on corporate social media direct from corporate leaders!The 3rd Annual Corporate Social Media SummitThe No 1 corporate-focused social media event –your One-Stop-Shop for everything you need knowFully embed social mediathroughout your company to engageconsumers, enhance your brandand boost your bottom lineTwo day business conference, June 13–14, 2012The New Yorker, New York Cityusefulsocialmedia.com/newyork Improve engagement, customersatisfaction and sales via a turbo-chargedexternal social media policy and make yourbrand friends for life Create a cohesive internal structurethat’s embedded throughout to boostcommunication whilst reducing business risk Measure your social impact to showbusiness worth, inform future strategyand meet your business priorities Lay the foundations for future successby fully understanding the changing marketissues to gain competitive advantageA practical and interactive business conference built for a corporate audience:#CSMNYJennifer WendtSocial Media Director, Schneider ElectricPerfectly targeted at the social marketerwith corporations – great examplesof corporate thought leadershipLori DeFurioSocial Media Manager, AdobeGreat content, great speakers.I will be able to use what I have learnthere immediately back in the office
  • 47. You can find us onAnd stay updated on all the latest corporate social media news and developmentsby signing up for our Tuesday Update at www.usefulsocialmedia.com@usefulsocial facebook.com/usefulsocialmedia linkd.in/USMgroupJoin the conversationwith leading corporatesocial media strategistsJoin us to:1 Discuss and debate practical social media issueswith large groups of knowledgeable peers2 Get exclusive content and earlyaccess to our briefingsand reports3 Receive special communitydiscounts and exclusiveson our productsUseful Social Media is building communities ofcorporate executives working in social media.