Join the community on:Twitter: @usefulsocialFacebook: /usefulsocialmediaLinked in: linkd.in/USMgroupSign up for our corpor...
You can find us onAnd stay updated on all the latest corporate social media news and developmentsby signing up for our Tue...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com2PageTableofcontentsForwardMethodologyWhat do corporate s...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com3Since December 2009, Useful Social Media have been lucky...
Get best practice on corporate social media direct from corporate leaders!The 3rd Annual Corporate Social Media SummitThe ...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com4About our respondentsParticipants were asked to complete...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com5What is the key focus of your role?[chart heading] What ...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com6number has swelled to an impressive 49%. This could back...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com7Do you work for a ‘corporate’ (client side) or for a ser...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com8The largest group of respondents to the survey come from...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com9How many members of staff work exclusively on social med...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com10The ‘Hub and Spoke’ model of social media is often decl...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com11How many members of staff engage with social media as p...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com12This helps us build up our picture of social media orga...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com13How many members of staff use social media in a profess...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com14This final dataset on team size again lends credence to...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com15From this dataset, one can confidently draw the conclus...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com16What department is your social media team a part of?The...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com17social media within business means it’s likely this is ...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com18What level of seniority is the head of the social media...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com19A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com20This question was asked as a continuation of the previo...
Get best practice on corporate social media direct from corporate leaders!The 3rd Annual Corporate Social Media SummitThe ...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com21This dataset is designed to shed further light on the m...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com22When you look at the USA, or at B2C corporations, the m...
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
The State of Corporate Social Media 2012
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The State of Corporate Social Media 2012

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"The State of Corporate Social Media" is a free briefing from Useful Social Media on how large companies are using social media, written by @gnjohnson.

The 2012 edition features over 40 pages of stats, facts, benchmarks and analysis on how social media is impacting business.

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The State of Corporate Social Media 2012

  1. 1. Join the community on:Twitter: @usefulsocialFacebook: /usefulsocialmediaLinked in: linkd.in/USMgroupSign up for our corporate social media newsletterat www.usefulsocialmedia.comWritten byNick JohnsonFounder, Useful Social Media@gnjohnsonwww.usefulsocialmedia.comThe State ofCorporateSocial Media
  2. 2. You can find us onAnd stay updated on all the latest corporate social media news and developmentsby signing up for our Tuesday Update at www.usefulsocialmedia.com@usefulsocial facebook.com/usefulsocialmedia linkd.in/USMgroupJoin the conversationwith leading corporatesocial media strategistsJoin us to:1 Discuss and debate practical social media issueswith large groups of knowledgeable peers2 Get exclusive content and earlyaccess to our briefingsand reports3 Receive special communitydiscounts and exclusiveson our productsUseful Social Media is building communities ofcorporate executives working in social media.
  3. 3. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com2PageTableofcontentsForwardMethodologyWhat do corporate social media teams look like?Who owns corporate social media?What does your social media department do?Budgets for corporate social mediaSocial Media Metrics and MeasurementWorking with external service providers3491621262940
  4. 4. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com3Since December 2009, Useful Social Media have been lucky enough towitness first-hand the explosion in corporate social media adoption.The growth of social media, and it’s consequent invasion of – initially, at least –corporate marketing departments, has signalled a fundamental shift in how corporationscommunicate with their stakeholders.For so long, the relationship was one of loudspeaker to mute crowd. A company boughtTV advertising, billboards, and radio slots to declare how wonderful and worthy of moneytheir product or service was.Consumers were expected to listen, not respond.No longer.The advent of social media has opened the lines of communication between producer andconsumer. Marketing is no longer a one-way street. Now everyone is talking to everyoneelse. Producers to consumers. Consumers to producers. Consumers to consumers(about producers).And now things are starting to spread. The incubation chamber of social media is hatchinga real revolution in corporate-consumer relations. Companies and consumers are bothstarting to ask:Why stop at marketing?Companies are realising social media can be leveraged for so much more than gettingmarketing messages across. And equally, consumers are realising than simply listening/responding to marketing messages is a missed opportunity, and does not leverage the fullpower that social media has given them.Customer service. Product development. Employee engagement. Crisis response.Social is beginning to be incorporated into every aspect of business.In this briefing we will look at the hard statistics that represent this revolution. We will lookat social media resourcing (financial and human), we will look at key social objectives andgoals, we’ll look at ROI and other metrics, key networks, and plans for the future.If you work on social media for big brands – or make it your business to understand howthese big brands approach social – then this 50 page document contains key stats, facts,analysis and trends that will ensure you take full advantage of this revolutionary shift in therelationship between businesses and their consumers. Read on, Nick Nick Johnson Founder Useful Social MediaForeword
  5. 5. Get best practice on corporate social media direct from corporate leaders!The 3rd Annual Corporate Social Media SummitThe No 1 corporate-focused social media event –your One-Stop-Shop for everything you need knowFully embed social mediathroughout your company to engageconsumers, enhance your brandand boost your bottom lineTwo day business conference, June 13–14, 2012The New Yorker, New York Cityusefulsocialmedia.com/newyork Improve engagement, customersatisfaction and sales via a turbo-chargedexternal social media policy and make yourbrand friends for life Create a cohesive internal structurethat’s embedded throughout to boostcommunication whilst reducing business risk Measure your social impact to showbusiness worth, inform future strategyand meet your business priorities Lay the foundations for future successby fully understanding the changing marketissues to gain competitive advantageA practical and interactive business conference built for a corporate audience:#CSMNYJennifer WendtSocial Media Director, Schneider ElectricPerfectly targeted at the social marketerwith corporations – great examplesof corporate thought leadershipLori DeFurioSocial Media Manager, AdobeGreat content, great speakers.I will be able to use what I have learnthere immediately back in the office
  6. 6. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com4About our respondentsParticipants were asked to complete our survey anonymously – working on the theory thatit will encourage a more honest response. This year, over 650 individuals responded to oursurvey – a six-fold increase on the 2011 version. Even this small fact bears testament tothe growing importance of social media to large businesses.The Useful Social Media audience tends to be relatively international, with an emphasis onthe UK and the East Coast of the USA. Our audience is made up predominantly of socialmedia practitioners within big brands and other companies, though there is a significantelement of our database hailing from the ‘service provider’ side.It’s important to get clarity on who is responding to the survey, before one can draw usefulconclusions from it. For this reason, we have often split out data in a few ways. Manycharts focus on data solely from the ‘corporate’ respondents to the survey.As well as this, we have often split out data to compare and contrast differences to twogroups – B2B and B2C respondents, and respondents from Europe and the USA.More information on our respondents can be found in the three charts below – coveringjob role, seniority, and geographical location.A comparison with 2011 to spot trendsThis is the second ‘State of Corporate Social Media’ report that we’ve produced. Weproduce the briefing on an annual basis, in the early part of the year – and conduct thesurvey itself across the last months of the preceding year.One of the strengths of an annual publication is the opportunity to compare and contrastresults over the twelve months, spot trends and identify changes. Throughout the report,we’ll be highlighting significant shifts for you.However - we’re not comparing all sets of data with 2011 results because this year’ssample is so much more extensive. An awful lot of small changes may well be down toa smaller sample size in 2011. Therefore we’re only going to highlight what look to besignificant shifts over the last twelve months.Methodology
  7. 7. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com5What is the key focus of your role?[chart heading] What is the key focus of your role?  The most popular job title in our survey respondents was, as last year, marketing/communications. This isunsurprising – most companies tend to incorporate social media into marketing/communications teams, beforelooking (or being forced to look) at implementation within other departments.Interestingly, 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses on social – suggesting a growth inthe popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that of discrete social media departments.[chart heading] How senior are you?  Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter of our respondentswere of a Manager level.When compared with 2011, the first interesting shift becomes apparent. In 2011, only 33% of our respondentswere Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that number has swelled to an impressive 49%. Thiscould back an assertion that companies are beginning to treat social media as more important to their coregoals, and that direct exposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.13%  21%  9%  2%  2%  4%  15%  3%  31%  What  job  )tles  do  our  respondents  have?    Social  Marke3ng  Communica3ons  Community  Brand  Digital  Media  Web  None  of  the  above  9%  4%  18%  26%  4%  39%  Seniority  of  respondents  C-­‐suite  (chief,  CEO,  CIO,  CMO,  President)  Vice-­‐President  (VP,  Vice)  Director  (dir/head)  Manager  (mgr)  Execu3ve  (adm,  assistant,  officer  The most popular job title in our survey respondents was, as last year, marketing/communications. This is unsurprising – most companies tend to incorporate socialmedia into marketing/communications teams, before looking (or being forced to look) atimplementation within other departments.Interestingly, 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses on social –suggesting a growth in the popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that ofdiscrete social media departments.How senior are you?[chart heading] What is the key focus of your role?  The most popular job title in our survey respondents was, as last year, marketing/communications.unsurprising – most companies tend to incorporate social media into marketing/communications telooking (or being forced to look) at implementation within other departments.Interestingly, 13% of respondents suggest their role predominantly focuses on social – suggesting athe popularity of both social media-specific roles, and that of discrete social media departments.[chart heading] How senior are you?  Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter of our respowere of a Manager level.When compared with 2011, the first interesting shift becomes apparent. In 2011, only 33% of our rwere Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that number has swelled to an impressivecould back an assertion that companies are beginning to treat social media as more important to thgoals, and that direct exposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.13%  21%  9%  2%  2%  4%  15%  3%  31%  What  job  )tles  do  our  respondents  have?    Social  Marke3ngCommuniCommuniBrand  Digital  Media  Web  None  of  t9%  4%  18%  26%  4%  39%  Seniority  of  respondents  C-­‐suite  (chief,  CEO,  CIO,  CMO,  President)  Vice-­‐President  (VP,  Vice)  Director  (dir/head)  Manager  (mgr)  Execu3ve  (adm,  assistant,  officer  Unsurprisingly, social media is still the domain of relatively junior staff. Over a quarter ofour respondents were of a Manager level.When compared with 2011, the first interesting shift becomes apparent. In 2011, only33% of our respondents were Director-level, or more senior. However, this year that
  8. 8. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com6number has swelled to an impressive 49%. This could back an assertion that companiesare beginning to treat social media as more important to their core goals, and that directexposure to social is climbing the corporate ladder.In what part of the world are you located?[chart title] In what part of the world are you located?As is visible from the above, the respondents to this survey were truly global – though a majority come fromthe USA and Canada.Whilst this reflects our own area of operations, it is often assumed that the corporate social media adoptionrate is more advanced than in Europe. This chart would appear to lend credence to that argument – thoughother subsequent graphs and charts will be used to determine the viability of this statement.[chart title] Do you work for a ‘corporate’ (client side) or for a service provider (agency-side)[Moving forward – for all ‘general charts’ – those which weren’t produced in Word/Excel, like the onenext – can you just use the title on the chart itself as the [chart title], and remove the title text fromthe chart image?As is visible from the above, the respondents to this survey were truly global – though amajority come from the USA and Canada.Whilst this reflects our own area of operations, it is often assumed that the corporatesocial media adoption rate is more advanced than in Europe. This chart would appear tolend credence to that argument – though other subsequent graphs and charts will be usedto determine the viability of this statement.
  9. 9. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com7Do you work for a ‘corporate’ (client side) or for a service provider (agency-side)A significant minority of respondents work in the service provider space, on the ‘agency side’.While this group is a critical one when it comes to social media adoption, the stated aim of this briefing is tolearn more about corporate approach to social media. For this reason, we will split out corporate responsesfrom those of service providers in several of the following chapters – to ensure a clear picture of the state ofsocial media in large business is built up.Do you work for a B2B or B2C businessThe largest group of respondents to the survey come from the B2C world. This is to be expected – the mostimmediate social media benefits tally most closely with B2C businesses – marketing to large groups,engagement on a large scale, generating a high volume of new leads.However, over half of all respondents also work in the B2B space, indicating a rapidly growing realisation thatsocial media is somewhat more complex than simply a large-scale marketing channel, and indeed offers morebenefits – like customer service, expertise sharing and deeper engagement.A significant minority of respondents work in the service provider space, on the ‘agency side’.While this group is a critical one when it comes to social media adoption, the stated aimof this briefing is to learn more about corporate approach to social media. For this reason,we will split out corporate responses from those of service providers in several of thefollowing chapters – to ensure a clear picture of the state of social media in large businessis built up.
  10. 10. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com8The largest group of respondents to the survey come from the B2C world. This is tobe expected – the most immediate social media benefits tally most closely with B2Cbusinesses – marketing to large groups, engagement on a large scale, generating a highvolume of new leads.However, over half of all respondents also work in the B2B space, indicating a rapidlygrowing realisation that social media is somewhat more complex than simply a large-scalemarketing channel, and indeed offers more benefits – like customer service, expertisesharing and deeper engagement.
  11. 11. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com9How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained prettymuch the same. A typical team would be of about one or two people working exclusivelyon social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners,one can begin to identify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or morepeople working exclusively on social media. In 2011, that figure was 22%.The initial reading of this would imply a lack of progress – indeed, a reversal – in socialadoption within business. However, there is an alternative view.What do corporate social mediateams look like?[CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  [CHAPTER] What do corporate social media teams look like?[chart heading] How many members of staff work exclusively on social media at your company?[for these charts – made in excel and word – can you please reduce the size of the chart title tobe very small and left justified? Can you also ensure size consistency, and that we use the sameorder each time (ie CORPORATE as the biggest chart, and then four below in this order – USAand Europe on one line, and then B2C and B2B on the next line – similar sized to below]In comparison with our 2011 report, the average social media team has remained pretty much the same. Atypical team would be of about one or two people working exclusively on social media.However, when you break out the higher figures – ie team with four or more practitioners, one can begin toidentify a trend. 17.5% of 2012 companies say they have four or more people working exclusively on socialmedia. In 2011, that figure was 22%.44%  24%  18%  5%  9%  Results  from  corporate-­‐only  prac))oners  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  50%  21%  17%  4%  8%  EUROPEAN  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  6+  40%  27%  18%  5%  10%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  31%  29%  22%  7%  11%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  52%  24%  17%  2%   5%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Corporate only practitionersEUROPEAN CorporatesB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B Corporates
  12. 12. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com10The ‘Hub and Spoke’ model of social media is often declared to be (see Solis) a moreadvanced step on the social media journey. In this model, companies build up a smallteam of social media practitioners (the hub), who influence, direct and assist individualswithin other departments around the business (spokes). The ‘spokes’ are there to executesocial media policy – which is often set by the hub.Before this, companies tended to have a less strategic structure – building up a largergroup of practitioners in one department who are there to ‘do everything’.We see the reduction in team size as a move towards a hub and spoke model – reducingthe number of people who work exclusively on social media to a core team of one or two,and then giving social responsibilities to others within the organisation as part of their coreresponsibilities.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsOnce we break down this data to focus exclusively on the differences between Europeanand US corporations, it becomes apparent that differences exist. One can conclude thatUS-based companies are more likely to have more people working exclusively on socialmedia than their European counterparts. Only 50% of Europeans have anyone workingfull-time on social, while the figure is 60% for US companies.This implies a continuation of last year’s trend of Europeans lagging behind UScorporations in social media adoption – though it’s worth pointing out that the gap seemsto have narrowed.When you look at the split between B2C and B2B businesses, the difference is far moreobvious. While only 48% of B2B companies have anyone working on social media full-time,a huge 69% of B2C companies do. As well as that, a full 40% of these B2C companieshave two or more people working on social, compared to 24% of B2B companies.Recently, Useful Social Media produced an article highlighting the top 5 companiesworking with social media today. Every featured company was drawn from the B2C world.Perhaps this lack of staffing goes some way to explain the poor showing for B2Bs.
  13. 13. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com11How many members of staff engage with social media as part of their responsibilities?The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half ofcompanies don’t have anyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie92%) have at least one employee for whom social media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C,B2B, European or US data, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a keyresponsibility. It’s also worth noting that significant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2Brespondents) say six or more people in the company have social as a core part of theirrole.The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  The first conclusion one can draw from this set of charts is that while about half of companies don’t haveanyone working on social media full-time, the vast majority (ie 92%) have at least one employee for whomsocial media is a key part of their role.The most popular response, regardless of whether we focus on corporate-only, B2C, B2B, European or USdata, tends to be two to three people for whom social is a key responsibility. It’s also worth noting thatsignificant numbers (25%+, excepting our B2B respondents) say six or more people in the company have socialas a core part of their role.8%  18%  35%  14%  25%  Only  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  17%  31%  19%  27%  USA  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  17%  39%  11%  25%  European  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  6%  22%  30%  15%  27%  B2C  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  8%  20%  38%  13%  21%  B2B  Corporates  No-­‐one  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four  -­‐  Six  Six+  Corporate only practitionersEUROPEAN CorporatesB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B Corporates
  14. 14. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com12This helps us build up our picture of social media organisation within businesses. It seemsthat there is usually one, or perhaps two, executives working exclusively on social media.Below them is a larger team of two or three (or significantly more) for whom social is a keyuse of their time.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsThe picture built up by the former set of charts is backed by those from this dataset.While most companies from both sides of the Atlantic have two to three practitionersusing social part-time, once you get to bigger groups, the US again proves ahead ofEurope in adoption rates. A huge 46% of US-based companies have four or more peopleworking on social part-time, compared with 36% in Europe.The same is true when we break down the data by company-type. B2C adoption ratesappear to be ahead – with 42% of companies having more than 4 people working onsocial media as part of their responsibility, compared to 33% for B2B companies.It’s worth noting, for both of the above splits, however – that even though the numberof people working on social differ depending on whether a company is B2B or B2C,European or American, 92% of all companies have someone working on social as part oftheir responsibility. The question is certainly not whether social media is being adopted bybusinesses, but to what extent.
  15. 15. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com13How many members of staff use social media in a professional capacity, but not as part of theirspecific responsibilities?This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spoke adoption throughoutbusinesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more about those people within companies who douse social media, and have had approval from senior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core partof their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over a third of all respondentssay 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhaps foolish for not adding higher options above6+).16%  12%  24%  12%  36%  Corporates  Only  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  8%  22%  11%  41%  USA  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  25%  13%  31%  European  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  15%  16%  20%  11%  38%  B2C  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  18%  9%  29%  11%  33%  B2B  Corporates  Zero  One  Two  -­‐  Three  Four-­‐  Six  6+  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  16. 16. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com14This final dataset on team size again lends credence to a hypothesis of hub and spokeadoption throughout businesses. In this question, we were looking to find out more aboutthose people within companies who do use social media, and have had approval fromsenior management to do so – but for whom it isn’t a core part of their role.Unsurprisingly, the responses are far higher for the larger options in this case. Over athird of all respondents say 6 or more people use social in this way (and we were perhapsfoolish for not adding higher options above 6+).One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of theirrole, and those who use social at work without clear management, shows a widespreadlack of oversight and strategic direction. There are many more people who use socialmedia ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who do so as part of a wider corporatestrategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporatestrategy, tie it to broader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout thebusiness.Is there a discrete social media team within your company?One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?From this dataset, one can confidently draw the conclusion (with the interesting exception of B2C businesses)43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?From this dataset, one can confidently draw the conclusion (with the interesting exception of B2C businesses)that most companies do not have a discrete social media department.43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  One can suggest that the discrepancy between those for whom social is a key part of their role, and thosewho use social at work without clear management, shows a widespread lack of oversight and strategicdirection. There are many more people who use social media ‘off their own bat’ at work than those who doso as part of a wider corporate strategy.There is still a long way to go for companies to incorporate social fully into corporate strategy, tie it tobroader responsibilities, and build it into key roles throughout the business.[chart title] Is there a discrete social media team within your company?43%  57%  Corporates  Only  Yes  No  47%  53%  USA  Corporates  Yes  No  37%  63%  European  Corporates  Yes  No  50%  50%  B2C  Corporates  Yes  No  36%  64%  B2B  Corporates  Yes  No  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  17. 17. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com15From this dataset, one can confidently draw the conclusion (with the interesting exceptionof B2C businesses) that most companies do not have a discrete social media department.Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could drawtwo opposite conclusions1. That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumedinto the Marketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in thejourney to a more holistic corporate adoption2. That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embeddedthroughout key departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Mediapractitioner is not fully complete until embedding social has become so extensive thathis job is redundant. Do the responses above suggest these practitioners have beenalarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.
  18. 18. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com16What department is your social media team a part of?The first observation one can sensibly make here is that corporate social media practitionersstill sit in the marketing team to a great extent. Over half of all respondents (exceptingthose from Europe) are responding while sat at a desk in the Marketing department.However, it’s important to note that this question asks about the locationof the team,not their key focus. There is nothing precluding these people sitting in marketing teams,but working on leveraging social for reputation management, for customer service, foremployee engagement and more. Indeed, some would say that the oft-chaotic growth ofWho owns corporate social media?Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could draw two oppositeconclusions1) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumed into theMarketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in the journey to a more holisticcorporate adoption2) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embedded throughoutkey departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Media practitioner is not fullycomplete until embedding social has become so extensive that his job is redundant. Do the responsesabove suggest these practitioners have been alarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.[chapter] Who owns corporate social media?[chart title] What department is your social media team a part of?20%  8%  57%  15%  Corporates  Only  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  7%  63%  10%  USA  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  5%  44%  31%  European  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  The first observation one can sensibly make here is that corporate social media practitioners still sit in themarketing team to a great extent. Over half of all respondents (excepting those from Europe) are respondingwhile sat at a desk in the Marketing department.However, it’s important to note that this question asks about the locationof the team, not their key focus.There is nothing precluding these people sitting in marketing teams, but working on leveraging social forreputation management, for customer service, for employee engagement and more. Indeed, some would saythat the oft-chaotic growth of social media within business means it’s likely this is the case.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsWhen we take a deeper dive, the most obvious point is that European corporations seem to have placed socialmedia experts in a greater variety of positions than their US counterparts. Only 44% of respondents in Europesit in marketing teams, compared to 63% in the USA.Does this indicate a more embedded and wider-reaching social media strategy in Europe than the USA?A surprising result is that 71% of B2B companies place their social media teams in the marketing department.29%  8%  59%  4%  B2C  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  21%  4%  71%  4%  B2B  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could draw two oppositeconclusions1) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumed into theMarketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in the journey to a more holisticcorporate adoption2) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embedded throughoutkey departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Media practitioner is not fullycomplete until embedding social has become so extensive that his job is redundant. Do the responsesabove suggest these practitioners have been alarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.[chapter] Who owns corporate social media?[chart title] What department is your social media team a part of?20%  8%  57%  15%  Corporates  Only  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  7%  63%  10%  USA  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  5%  44%  31%  European  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  Of course, this response gives us a limited insight into corporate practice. One could draw two oppositeconclusions1) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social media is still subsumed into theMarketing/Communications department, and is therefore still early in the journey to a more holisticcorporate adoption2) That the lack of a discrete department suggests that social has become fully-embedded throughoutkey departments. One argument is that the job of a Corporate Social Media practitioner is not fullycomplete until embedding social has become so extensive that his job is redundant. Do the responsesabove suggest these practitioners have been alarmingly successful in achieving that aim?Realistically, the reality falls somewhere between these two poles.[chapter] Who owns corporate social media?[chart title] What department is your social media team a part of?20%  8%  57%  15%  Corporates  Only  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  7%  63%  10%  USA  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  20%  5%  44%  31%  European  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  The first observation one can sensibly make here is that corporate social media practitioners still sit in themarketing team to a great extent. Over half of all respondents (excepting those from Europe) are respondingwhile sat at a desk in the Marketing department.However, it’s important to note that this question asks about the locationof the team, not their key focus.There is nothing precluding these people sitting in marketing teams, but working on leveraging social forreputation management, for customer service, for employee engagement and more. Indeed, some would saythat the oft-chaotic growth of social media within business means it’s likely this is the case.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsWhen we take a deeper dive, the most obvious point is that European corporations seem to have placed socialmedia experts in a greater variety of positions than their US counterparts. Only 44% of respondents in Europesit in marketing teams, compared to 63% in the USA.Does this indicate a more embedded and wider-reaching social media strategy in Europe than the USA?A surprising result is that 71% of B2B companies place their social media teams in the marketing department.29%  8%  59%  4%  B2C  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  21%  4%  71%  4%  B2B  Corporates  Comms  Discrete  SM  dept  Marke3ng  Other  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  19. 19. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com17social media within business means it’s likely this is the case.Breaking down the data to investigate other trendsWhen we take a deeper dive, the most obvious point is that European corporationsseem to have placed social media experts in a greater variety of positions than their UScounterparts. Only 44% of respondents in Europe sit in marketing teams, compared to63% in the USA.Does this indicate a more embedded and wider-reaching social media strategy in Europethan the USA?A surprising result is that 71% of B2B companies place their social media teams in themarketing department. This is not only higher than their B2C counterparts, but significantlyhigher than the corporate average.Does this show a weakness of social for B2Bs – is it harder to use social media forcustomer service, for risk management, when you work in this area? With a smaller, buthigher value set of clients, perhaps B2Bs have reservations about social’s ability to dealwith complex consumer relationships and histories – and thus focus more closely onmarketing? Whereas B2C companies tend to have more simplistic engagement with themajority of their consumers, so can afford to shift more customer service delivery to asocial platform? This is a tempting conclusion to draw – though it’s important to note thatit’s not the only viable option.Perhaps the figures simply denotes that B2B companies are behind their B2C counterpartsin social adoption – that they haven’t moved on from placing the team in the marketingdepartment yet.
  20. 20. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com18What level of seniority is the head of the social media team?This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important socialmedia is judged to be by large companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social mediateam’, the more important social is to that company.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression insocial’s importance to a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their socialmedia team has dropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directorsrunning social teams has risen, from 20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the twoyears are roughly the same.Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN CorporatesThis question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  This question was asked because it provides an indication as to how important social media is judged to be bylarge companies. The more senior the head of the ‘social media team’, the more important social is to thatcompany.Bearing that in mind, when one compares results with 2011, one can see a progression in social’s importanceto a company.The number of people who stated that a ‘manager-level’ employee heads up their social media team hasdropped from 46% to 42%. At the same time, the number of Directors running social teams has risen, from20% to 27%. Apart from that, the figures for the two years are roughly the same.1%   2%  27%  17%  42%  7%  4%  Corporates  Only  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  0%  31%  13%  45%  10%   1%  USA  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  3%  23%  23%  36%  5%  10%  European  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  2%  0%  29%  11%  46%  10%  2%  B2C  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  0%  2%  29%  17%  36%  8%  8%  B2B  Corporates  Board  C  Suite  Director  Execu3ve  Manager  VP    No  team  
  21. 21. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com19A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person headingup social at their company is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to59% in Europe. However, 10% of US companies responded that a VP heads the socialmedia department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, it seems that while the bulk ofEuropean and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard is againdrawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too closeto call. 57% of B2C respondents have a manager/exec in control of the social mediateam, compared to 53% of B2B companies. Both sectors have a 29% response rate forDirectors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2C audience, and 10% forB2Bs.Who does the social media team ultimately report to?[subhead]A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person heading up social at theircompany is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to 59% in Europe. However, 10% of UScompanies responded that a VP heads the social media department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, itseems that while the bulk of European and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard isagain drawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too close to call. 57% of B2Crespondents have a manager/exec in control of the social media team, compared to 53% of B2B companies.Both sectors have a 29% response rate for Directors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2Caudience, and 10% for B2Bs.[chart title] Who does the social media team ultimately report to?3%  14%  16%  48%  14%  5%  Corporates  Only  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  1%  12%  18%  57%  10%  2%   USA  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  5%  20%  10%  31%  26%  8%  European  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  [subhead]A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person heading up social at theircompany is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to 59% in Europe. However, 10% of UScompanies responded that a VP heads the social media department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, itseems that while the bulk of European and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard isagain drawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too close to call. 57% of B2Crespondents have a manager/exec in control of the social media team, compared to 53% of B2B companies.Both sectors have a 29% response rate for Directors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2Caudience, and 10% for B2Bs.[chart title] Who does the social media team ultimately report to?3%  14%  16%  48%  14%  5%  Corporates  Only  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  1%  12%  18%  57%  10%  2%   USA  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  5%  20%  10%  31%  26%  8%  European  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  This question was asked as a continuation of the previous – ie, how seriously is social taken by companies?This time, we see who the social media team ultimately reports to. Again, the rationale is that the more seniorthe person to report to, the more seriously social media is taken.Predictably perhaps, the most common response by some distance was a system of reporting to the Head ofMarketing. Social is still very much part of the marketing department’s domain.5%  6%  25%  54%  6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  2%  23%  9%  54%  4%  8%  B2B  Corporates   Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  This question was asked as a continuation of the previous – ie, how seriously is social taken by companies?This time, we see who the social media team ultimately reports to. Again, the rationale is that the more seniorthe person to report to, the more seriously social media is taken.Predictably perhaps, the most common response by some distance was a system of reporting to the Head ofMarketing. Social is still very much part of the marketing department’s domain.5%  6%  25%  54%  6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  2%  23%  9%  54%  4%  8%  B2B  Corporates   Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  [subhead]A deeper diveThe US and Europe are in similar positions – 58% of respondents say the person heading up social at theircompany is either an ‘executive’ or a ‘manager’ in the US, compared to 59% in Europe. However, 10% of UScompanies responded that a VP heads the social media department – compared to 5% in the UK. Again, itseems that while the bulk of European and US companies are at approximately the same level, the vanguard isagain drawn from the United States.When we look at the B2C/B2B split, the race for social media adoption is too close to call. 57% of B2Crespondents have a manager/exec in control of the social media team, compared to 53% of B2B companies.Both sectors have a 29% response rate for Directors, and the figures for VPs and above is 12% for the B2Caudience, and 10% for B2Bs.[chart title] Who does the social media team ultimately report to?3%  14%  16%  48%  14%  5%  Corporates  Only  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  1%  12%  18%  57%  10%  2%   USA  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  5%  20%  10%  31%  26%  8%  European  Corporates  Board  CEO  Head  of  Comms  Head  of  Mkt  Other  No  team  Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  22. 22. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com20This question was asked as a continuation of the previous – ie, how seriously is socialtaken by companies? This time, we see who the social media team ultimately reports to.Again, the rationale is that the more senior the person to report to, the more seriouslysocial media is taken.Predictably perhaps, the most common response by some distance was a system of reportingto the Head of Marketing. Social is still very much part of the marketing department’s domain.Below that, the honours are shared between the Head of Comms, ‘other’, and, intriguingly,the CEO of the Company. 23% of B2B respondents report directly to the CEO. It’s aninteresting stat, and would seem to lend credence to the fact that B2Bs are not as farbehind their B2C counterparts as common knowledge suggests – at least in terms ofadoption, if not execution.A quick summary of key findings from the first two chapters• Social is still predominantly part of corporate marketing departments The vast majority of charts above seem to suggest that social media is still organised bypeople working in the marketing department. While there is evidence (and will continueto be, throughout the briefing) of social taking on a wider corporate significance, thediscipline is still very much rooted in the Marketing Dept – as was the case in 2011.• The Hub and Spoke model appears to be in place While it is true that the statistics could be used to draw other conclusions, viewing thesestats through a lens of commentary from people like Brian Solis allow us to use them tocorroborate the view that the Hub and Spoke model is being introduced to manage socialmedia across business. The typical team has typically one or two people working on socialfull time, with roughly double that having social goals as part of their key responsibilities,and then a significantly larger number using social as part of their professional life.• Where there is a vanguard, it tends to be based in the USA While statistics seem to suggest a narrowing of the adoption gap between US andEuropean corporates, once you look at thie ‘higher end’ results (ie 6+ people workingon social, Head of Department being a VP, etc) you’ll see that US companies tend tobe more developed than their European peers.• B2Bs still aiming at marketing – imply further behind (or structural difficulties) B2B and B2C companies tend to be pretty similar when it comes to team make-upand seniority. The biggest difference is where the team is located within the business– for B2Bs, the answer is resolutely as part of the marketing department. This couldmean one of two things: • That B2Bs are still at the very start of their journey, and are only using social formarketing (not customer service, risk management, etc) • That B2Bs are structuraly unable to focus social media anywhere but marketing –because of how they do business, social does not lend itself to customer servicefor higher value clients, or anything other than generating leads. Throughout therest of this report we’ll examine this hypothesis in further detail.
  23. 23. Get best practice on corporate social media direct from corporate leaders!The 3rd Annual Corporate Social Media SummitThe No 1 corporate-focused social media event –your One-Stop-Shop for everything you need knowFully embed social mediathroughout your company to engageconsumers, enhance your brandand boost your bottom lineTwo day business conference, June 13–14, 2012The New Yorker, New York Cityusefulsocialmedia.com/newyork Improve engagement, customersatisfaction and sales via a turbo-chargedexternal social media policy and make yourbrand friends for life Create a cohesive internal structurethat’s embedded throughout to boostcommunication whilst reducing business risk Measure your social impact to showbusiness worth, inform future strategyand meet your business priorities Lay the foundations for future successby fully understanding the changing marketissues to gain competitive advantageA practical and interactive business conference built for a corporate audience:#CSMNYJennifer WendtSocial Media Director, Schneider ElectricPerfectly targeted at the social marketerwith corporations – great examplesof corporate thought leadershipLori DeFurioSocial Media Manager, AdobeGreat content, great speakers.I will be able to use what I have learnthere immediately back in the office
  24. 24. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com21This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media managementused across the world, and within different business types. In this case, we will be lookingto find evidence to support a widespread adoption of hub and spoke. For this to be thecase, we would need to see a significant chunk of responses indicating that social mediateams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking, trainingand helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.In short, the statistics simply don’t say that. 62% of social media teams at corporationsare primarily responsible for executing strategy. Only 13% develop that strategy for othersto execute.This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%  6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  This dataset is designed to shed further light on the model of social media management used across the world,and within different business types. In this case, we will be looking to find evidence to support a widespreadadoption of hub and spoke. For this to be the case, we would need to see a significant chunk of responsesindicating that social media teams are not executing strategy, but determining what that strategy is, tracking,training and helping other departments to leverage social to its fullest.13%  62%  8%  3%   8%  6%  Corporates  Only  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  71%  6%  1%  5%  5%  USA  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  8%  51%  13%  5%  15%  8%  European  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  9%  71%  6%  4%   6%   4%  B2C  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  12%  54%  4%  0%  17%  13%  B2B  Corporates  Strategy  for  others  Execute  strategy  Other  Tracking  impact  Training  No  team  What does your social mediadepartment do?Corporate only practitionersB2C CorporatesUSA CorporatesB2B CorporatesEUROPEAN Corporates
  25. 25. The State of Corporate Social Media 2012www.usefulsocialmedia.com22When you look at the USA, or at B2C corporations, the message is clearer – in this case,a huge 71% of respondents say they’re responsible for execution. Considering the teamis usually somewhere between 2 and 4 people in size – not all full time, they must beenormously overstretched.However, one can see that the second-most popular response (13% on average) isdefining that strategy for others – which fits with the hypothesis for a more progressive –and embedded - approach to social.B2B corporates spend more time planning strategy for others, and doing training. Thisseems to fit with a broader hypothesis that for B2B social media to work, one needsinvolvement from far more people throughout the company – you can’t rely simply on themarketing department, because proven B2B campaigns require thought leadership fromwithin the company to be shared with the outside world. It follows the social media team’srole will be to train up these people, rather than doing everything themselves.Even though in this question, only the most common activity was requested (obviously,social practitioners will do more than just one of the tasks above), it’s intriguing seeingthat so few people suggest that ‘tracking impact’ is their key focus. It suggests that plentyof companies are still at the “Throw a lot at the wall and see what sticks” approach, ratherthan an evolution of strategy based on proven returns.What are you currently using social media for at your company?In short, the statistics simply don’t say that. 62% of social media teams at corporations are primarilyresponsible for executing strategy. Only 13% develop that strategy for others to execute.When you look at the USA, or at B2C corporations, the message is clearer – in this case, a huge 71% ofrespondents say they’re responsible for execution. Considering the team is usually somewhere between 2 and4 people in size – not all full time, they must be enormously overstretched.However, one can see that the second-most popular response (13% on average) is defining that strategy forothers – which fits with the hypothesis for a more progressive – and embedded - approach to social.B2B corporates spend more time planning strategy for others, and doing training. This seems to fit with abroader hypothesis that for B2B social media to work, one needs involvement from far more people throughout thecompany – you can’t rely simply on the marketing department, because proven B2B campaigns require thoughtleadership from within the company to be shared with the outside world. It follows the social media team’s role willbe to train up these people, rather than doing everything themselves.Even though in this question, only the most common activity was requested (obviously, social practitioners willdo more than just one of the tasks above), it’s intriguing seeing that so few people suggest that ‘trackingimpact’ is their key focus. It suggests that plenty of companies are still at the “Throw a lot at the wall and seewhat sticks” approach, rather than an evolution of strategy based on proven returns.[chart title] What are you currently using social media for at your company?This is perhaps the most directly useful chart to our readership – giving, as it does, a clear picture oncorporate priorities on how social can be leveraged.Unsurprisingly, the leading responses are using social for communications and marketing. It chimes with ourearlier charts on team location, makeup and organisation.Following on from that, the most popular responses are using social for Reputation Monitoring, and thenCustomer Service. This seems to fit with our Hypothesis from the start of the briefing – that when a company‘dips their toe in the water’ to take advantage of social for some cheap and easy marketing, they areinvoluntarily dragged into a more holistic approach. Customer Service tends to be first on the list – oncepeople start using your marketing-oriented Twitter feed to complain about your products, corporates havelittle choice. Customer Service and Reputation Monitoring go hand in hand, and with the huge influx of0  50  100  150  200  250  300  Corporate  -­‐  only  NOW  12  MONTHS  This is perhaps the most directly useful chart to our readership – giving, as it does, a clearpicture on corporate priorities on how social can be leveraged.Unsurprisingly, the leading responses are using social for communications and marketing.It chimes with our earlier charts on team location, makeup and organisation.Following on from that, the most popular responses are using social for ReputationMonitoring, and then Customer Service. This seems to fit with our Hypothesis from thestart of the briefing – that when a company ‘dips their toe in the water’ to take advantageof social for some cheap and easy marketing, they are involuntarily dragged into a moreholistic approach. Customer Service tends to be first on the list – once people start usingCorporate only practitioners

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