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Asian American Young Adults Today
 

Asian American Young Adults Today

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This presentation was given at the ISAAC Asian American Young Adults Ministry workshop in Cupertino on March 28th. It includes demographic information about Asian American religious identification and ...

This presentation was given at the ISAAC Asian American Young Adults Ministry workshop in Cupertino on March 28th. It includes demographic information about Asian American religious identification and information about recent findings regarding Asian American Young Adult culture and youth mental health.

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Asian American Young Adults Today Asian American Young Adults Today Presentation Transcript

  • Asian American Young Adults © Timothy Tseng, Ph.D. Institute for the Study of Asian American Christianity (ISAAC) University of San Francisco Special thanks to Russell Jeung, Ph.D. San Francisco State University
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • isaacweb.org 2
  • Changing Immigration Patterns
  • American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) 2008
  • American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) 2008 • 15 Percent of Americans Have No Religion: Fewer Call Themselves Christians; Nondenominational Identification Increases (Washington Post, March 9, 2009)
  • ARIS 2008 3 American Religious Identification Part I Survey (ARIS) 2008 National Statistics on Belonging, Belief and Behavior • 15 Percent of Americans Have No Religion: Fewer Call Themselves Christians; Nondenominational Identification . Belonging Increases (Washington Post, March 9, 2009) Table 1. Religious Self-Identification of the U.S. Adult Population 1990, 2001, 2008 1990 2001 2008 Estimated Estimated Estimated % % % Number of People Number of People Number of People Catholic 46,004,000 26.2 50,873,000 24.5 57,199,000 25.1 Other Christian 105,221,000 60.0 108,641,000 52.2 116,203,000 50.9 Total Christians 151,225,000 86.2 159,514,000 76.7 173,402,000 76.0 Other Religions 5,853,000 3.3 7,740,000 3.7 8,796,000 3.9 Nones 14,331,000 8.2 29,481,000 14.2 34,169,000 15.0 DK/Refused 4,031,000 2.3 11,246,000 5.4 11,815,000 5.2 Total 175,440,000 100.0 207,983,000 100.0 228,182,000 100.0
  • findings reported in the earlier tables change over time as well as how they impact American society. American Religious Identification A. Racial Composition Survey (ARIS) 2008 Table 10. Composition of Racial and Ethnic Groups by Religious Tradition 1990, 2001, 2008 White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic Hispanic Asian 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 Catholic 27 23 21 9 7 6 66 57 59 27 20 17 Baptist 15 15 15 50 46 45 7 5 3 9 4 3 Mainline Christian 21 22 17 12 10 7 4 3 1 11 6 6 Christian Generic 17 11 15 9 10 15 8 11 11 13 11 10 Pentecostal/ 3 3 3 6 7 7 3 4 3 2 1 0 Charismatic Protestant 2 3 3 4 4 6 2 3 4 2 1 2 Denominations Mormon/LDS 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 Jewish 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 Eastern Religions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 22 21 Muslim 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 8 8 NRM & Other 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 Religions None 8 15 16 6 11 11 6 13 12 16 22 27 DK/Refused 2 4 4 1 2 2 1 3 5 4 5 5 Total % 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
  • findings reported in the earlier tables change over time as well as how they impact American society. American Religious Identification A. Racial Composition Survey (ARIS) 2008 Table 10. Composition of Racial and Ethnic Groups by Religious Tradition 1990, 2001, 2008 White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic Hispanic Asian 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 Catholic 27 23 21 9 7 6 66 57 59 27 20 17 Baptist 15 15 15 50 46 45 7 5 3 9 4 3 Mainline Christian 21 22 17 12 10 7 4 3 1 11 6 6 Christian Generic 17 11 15 9 10 15 8 11 11 13 11 10 Pentecostal/ 3 3 3 6 7 7 3 4 3 2 1 0 Charismatic Protestant 2 3 3 4 4 6 2 3 4 2 1 2 Denominations Mormon/LDS 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 Jewish 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 Eastern Religions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 22 21 Muslim 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 8 8 NRM & Other 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 Religions None 8 15 16 6 11 11 6 13 12 16 22 27 DK/Refused 2 4 4 1 2 2 1 3 5 4 5 5 Total % 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
  • findings reported in the earlier tables change over time as well as how they impact American society. American Religious Identification A. Racial Composition Survey (ARIS) 2008 Table 10. Composition of Racial and Ethnic Groups by Religious Tradition 1990, 2001, 2008 White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic Hispanic Asian 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 Catholic 27 23 21 9 7 6 66 57 59 27 20 17 Baptist 15 15 15 50 46 45 7 5 3 9 4 3 Mainline Christian 21 22 17 12 10 7 4 3 1 11 6 6 Christian Generic 17 11 15 9 10 15 8 11 11 13 11 10 Pentecostal/ 3 3 3 6 7 7 3 4 3 2 1 0 Charismatic Protestant 2 3 3 4 4 6 2 3 4 2 1 2 Denominations Mormon/LDS 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 Jewish 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 Eastern Religions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 22 21 Muslim 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 8 8 NRM & Other 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 Religions None 8 15 16 6 11 11 6 13 12 16 22 27 DK/Refused 2 4 4 1 2 2 1 3 5 4 5 5 Total % 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
  • findings reported in the earlier tables change over time as well as how they impact American society. American Religious Identification A. Racial Composition Survey (ARIS) 2008 Table 10. Composition of Racial and Ethnic Groups by Religious Tradition 1990, 2001, 2008 White Non-Hispanic Black Non-Hispanic Hispanic Asian 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 1990 2001 2008 Catholic 27 23 21 9 7 6 66 57 59 27 20 17 Baptist 15 15 15 50 46 45 7 5 3 9 4 3 Mainline Christian 21 22 17 12 10 7 4 3 1 11 6 6 Christian Generic 17 11 15 9 10 15 8 11 11 13 11 10 Pentecostal/ 3 3 3 6 7 7 3 4 3 2 1 0 Charismatic Protestant 2 3 3 4 4 6 2 3 4 2 1 2 Denominations Mormon/LDS 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 0 Jewish 2 2 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 0 0 Eastern Religions 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 22 21 Muslim 0 0 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 3 8 8 NRM & Other 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 Religions None 8 15 16 6 11 11 6 13 12 16 22 27 DK/Refused 2 4 4 1 2 2 1 3 5 4 5 5 Total % 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100
  • Religious Affiliation of Asian Americans 40 30 All (2007) Young Adults (age 21-45) Youth (age 13-17) 20 10 0 nt ic st u lim e d er d on e l hi ta ho in us th us dd es N H O at ef M Bu ot C R Pr Source: Pew Forum U.S. Religious Affiliation Survey, 2007 (N=~700) Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey 2000 ages 21-45 (N=460) National Study of Religion and Youth, 2003-4 (N=45)
  • Changes in Asian American Religious Affiliation (1990-2007) 40 30 Asian Americans (2007) Asian Americans (2000) 20 Asian Americans (1990) 10 0 t ic t du lim e d an is er on se ol dh in th us st h u N H O at d e ef M Bu ot C R Pr Sources: Pew Forum U.S. Religious Affiliation Survey, 2007 (N=~700) Pilot Asian American Political Survey 2000-01 (N=1,218) National Survey of Religious Identification 1990 (N=460)
  • Spiritual Vitality: Immigration as a Theologizing Experience Nand Shiv Durga Mandir Montebello, CA
  • Spiritual Vitality: Immigration as a Theologizing Experience • Filipinos (94%) and Koreans (87%) are highly religious. Nand Shiv Durga Mandir Montebello, CA
  • Spiritual Vitality: Immigration as a Theologizing Experience • Filipinos (94%) and Koreans (87%) are highly religious. • Koreans (87%) and Filipinos (71%) have higher church attendance rates than others. Nand Shiv Durga Mandir Montebello, CA
  • Spiritual Vitality: Immigration as a Theologizing Experience • Filipinos (94%) and Koreans (87%) are highly religious. • Koreans (87%) and Filipinos (71%) have higher church attendance rates than others. • Asian Americans professing “Asian” religions have almost tripled since 1990. Nand Shiv Durga Mandir Montebello, CA
  • Spiritual Vitality: Immigration as a Theologizing Experience • Filipinos (94%) and Koreans (87%) are highly religious. • Koreans (87%) and Filipinos (71%) have higher church attendance rates than others. • Asian Americans professing “Asian” religions have almost tripled since 1990. • Asian Americans make up 88% of the Hindus, 32% of the Buddhists, and 20% of Muslims in the US. Nand Shiv Durga Mandir Montebello, CA
  • Spiritual Vitality: Immigration as a Theologizing Experience • Filipinos (94%) and Koreans (87%) are highly religious. • Koreans (87%) and Filipinos (71%) have higher church attendance rates than others. • Asian Americans professing “Asian” religions have almost tripled since 1990. • Asian Americans make up 88% of the Hindus, 32% of the Buddhists, and 20% of Muslims in the US. Nand Shiv Durga Mandir • Even among 21-45 year old Montebello, CA Asian Americans, 46% attend services weekly compared to 36% of US total population
  • Religiously Unaffiliated Asian Americans
  • Religiously Unaffiliated Asian Americans • Chinese (39%) and Japanese (26%) affiliate with religious groups much less than other ethnicities
  • Religiously Unaffiliated Asian Americans • Chinese (39%) and Japanese (26%) affiliate with religious groups much less than other ethnicities • 23% of Asian Americans overall are unaffiliated with a religion
  • Religiously Unaffiliated Asian Americans • Chinese (39%) and Japanese (26%) affiliate with religious groups much less than other ethnicities • 23% of Asian Americans overall are unaffiliated with a religion • Asian Americans (11%) are almost twice as secular as other Americans (6%)
  • Religiously Unaffiliated Asian Americans • Chinese (39%) and Unaffiliated 16% of 23% of Total Pop. Asian Japanese (26%) affiliate American with religious groups Pop. much less than other ethnicities Atheist 2 3 • 23% of Asian Americans overall are unaffiliated Agnostic 2 4 with a religion • Asian Americans (11%) are almost twice as Secular 6 11 secular as other Americans (6%) Religious 6 5 unaffiliated
  • Sources of Non-Affiliation Los Angeles Chinatown Temple, 1938
  • Sources of Non-Affiliation • Selective immigration: 44% of Asian Americans are college graduates Los Angeles Chinatown Temple, 1938
  • Sources of Non-Affiliation • Selective immigration: 44% of Asian Americans are college graduates • Nature of Asian American religiosity: inclusive, spiritual practices (v. exclusive, theological tenets) Los Angeles Chinatown Temple, 1938
  • Sources of Non-Affiliation • Selective immigration: 44% of Asian Americans are college graduates • Nature of Asian American religiosity: inclusive, spiritual practices (v. exclusive, theological tenets) • Continuing significance of Asian ethical and moral systems Los Angeles Chinatown Temple, 1938
  • Religious Diversity and Community Volunteerism Among Asian Americans* Religious Affiliation of Percent participating in at Asian Americans least one nonreligious organization Protestant Christian 69 Other Religion 65 Catholic 54 Nonreligious 45 Hindu 40 Buddhist 26 Total Sample 51 * Elaine Howard Ecklund and Jerry Park, Religious Diversity and Community Volunteerism Among Asian Americans.” Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Volume 46, Number 2, June 2007, pp. 233-244
  • Political Ideology of Asian Americans by Religious Affiliation* Protestant Catholic Buddhist Hindu Muslim None All Christian Very Liberal 4 8 6 18 8 10 8 Somewhat 27 32 21 43 50 22 28 Liberal Middle of 33 24 41 17 12 35 32 the Road Somewhat 25 24 12 14 17 15 18 Conservative Very 4 4 6 -- 8 3 4 Conservative Not Sure 7 7 14 8 4 13 10 * Pei-te Lien, “Religion and Political Adaptation among Asian Americans,” in Tony Carnes and Fenggang Yang, eds., Asian American Religions: The Making and Remaking of Borders and Boundaries, (New York: New York University Press, 2004)
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004)
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004) Chinese Filipino South Asian Vietnamese Korean Japanese 20% 18% 2% 13% 68% 37% Christian 3% 68% 1% 20% 11% 6% Catholic 19% 1% 1% 49% 5% 24% Buddhist - 4% 46% - - 1% Hindu - - 17% - - - Muslim 1% 2% 13% 1% 3% 2% Other 39% 3% 12% 14% 6% 26% None 18% 3% 7% 1% 6% 4% Refused 1% - 1% 3% 1% 1% Not sure
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004) Chinese Filipino South Asian Vietnamese Korean Japanese 20% 18% 2% 13% 68% 37% Christian 3% 68% 1% 20% 11% 6% Catholic 19% 1% 1% 49% 5% 24% Buddhist - 4% 46% - - 1% Hindu - - 17% - - - Muslim 1% 2% 13% 1% 3% 2% Other 39% 3% 12% 14% 6% 26% None 18% 3% 7% 1% 6% 4% Refused 1% - 1% 3% 1% 1% Not sure
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004) Chinese Filipino South Asian Vietnamese Korean Japanese 20% 18% 2% 13% 68% 37% Christian 3% 68% 1% 20% 11% 6% Catholic 19% 1% 1% 49% 5% 24% Buddhist - 4% 46% - - 1% Hindu - - 17% - - - Muslim 1% 2% 13% 1% 3% 2% Other 39% 3% 12% 14% 6% 26% None 18% 3% 7% 1% 6% 4% Refused 1% - 1% 3% 1% 1% Not sure
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004) Chinese Filipino South Asian Vietnamese Korean Japanese 20% 18% 2% 13% 68% 37% Christian 3% 68% 1% 20% 11% 6% Catholic 19% 1% 1% 49% 5% 24% Buddhist - 4% 46% - - 1% Hindu - - 17% - - - Muslim 1% 2% 13% 1% 3% 2% Other 39% 3% 12% 14% 6% 26% None 18% 3% 7% 1% 6% 4% Refused 1% - 1% 3% 1% 1% Not sure
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004) Chinese Filipino South Asian Vietnamese Korean Japanese 20% 18% 2% 13% 68% 37% Christian 3% 68% 1% 20% 11% 6% Catholic 19% 1% 1% 49% 5% 24% Buddhist - 4% 46% - - 1% Hindu - - 17% - - - Muslim 1% 2% 13% 1% 3% 2% Other 39% 3% 12% 14% 6% 26% None 18% 3% 7% 1% 6% 4% Refused 1% - 1% 3% 1% 1% Not sure
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004) Chinese Filipino South Asian Vietnamese Korean Japanese 20% 18% 2% 13% 68% 37% Christian 3% 68% 1% 20% 11% 6% Catholic 19% 1% 1% 49% 5% 24% Buddhist - 4% 46% - - 1% Hindu - - 17% - - - Muslim 1% 2% 13% 1% 3% 2% Other 39% 3% 12% 14% 6% 26% None 18% 3% 7% 1% 6% 4% Refused 1% - 1% 3% 1% 1% Not sure
  • Ethnic Asian American Religious Affiliation • Pilot National Asian American Political Survey (PNAAPS). Pei-te Lien and Tony Carnes, “The Religious Demography of Asian American Boundary Crossing” from Asian American Religions (New York University Press, 2004) Chinese Filipino South Asian Vietnamese Korean Japanese 20% 18% 2% 13% 68% 37% Christian 3% 68% 1% 20% 11% 6% Catholic 19% 1% 1% 49% 5% 24% Buddhist - 4% 46% - - 1% Hindu - - 17% - - - Muslim 1% 2% 13% 1% 3% 2% Other 39% 3% 12% 14% 6% 26% None 18% 3% 7% 1% 6% 4% Refused 1% - 1% 3% 1% 1% Not sure
  • 2nd Generation Asian American Religion and Ethnic Identity* * See Khyati Joshi, New Roots in America’s Sacred Ground, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006
  • 2nd Generation Asian American Religion and Ethnic Identity* • The Model Model Minority * See Khyati Joshi, New Roots in America’s Sacred Ground, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006
  • 2nd Generation Asian American Religion and Ethnic Identity* • The Model Model Minority • Religion as a primordial source of identity—home faith as real Indian-ness * See Khyati Joshi, New Roots in America’s Sacred Ground, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006
  • 2nd Generation Asian American Religion and Ethnic Identity* • The Model Model Minority • Religion as a primordial source of identity—home faith as real Indian-ness • Ethno-religious communities as a third space for extended family * See Khyati Joshi, New Roots in America’s Sacred Ground, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006
  • 2nd Generation Asian American Religion and Ethnic Identity* • The Model Model Minority • Religion as a primordial source of identity—home faith as real Indian-ness • Ethno-religious communities as a third space for extended family • Ethno-religious communities as preservers and transmitters of culture * See Khyati Joshi, New Roots in America’s Sacred Ground, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006
  • 2nd Generation Asian American Religion and Ethnic Identity* • The Model Model Minority • Religion as a primordial source of identity—home faith as real Indian-ness • Ethno-religious communities as a third space for extended family • Ethno-religious communities as preservers and transmitters of culture • Desire for authentic, other-worldly spirituality * See Khyati Joshi, New Roots in America’s Sacred Ground, New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2006
  • Consuming Citizenship 15
  • Consuming Citizenship • Lisa Sun-Hee Park, Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Stanford University Press, 2005) 15
  • Consuming Citizenship • Lisa Sun-Hee Park, Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Stanford University Press, 2005) • Why do “second generation Asian Americans feel compelled to remind others of their legitimate existence in the United States.” 15
  • Consuming Citizenship • Lisa Sun-Hee Park, Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Stanford University Press, 2005) • Why do “second generation Asian Americans feel compelled to remind others of their legitimate existence in the United States.” • How they “exert social citizenship through consumption.” 15
  • Consuming Citizenship • Lisa Sun-Hee Park, Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Stanford University Press, 2005) • Why do “second generation Asian Americans feel compelled to remind others of their legitimate existence in the United States.” • How they “exert social citizenship through consumption.” • Tim: what are their attitudes towards “foreigners”? 15
  • Consuming Citizenship • Lisa Sun-Hee Park, Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Stanford University Press, 2005) • Why do “second generation Asian Americans feel compelled to remind others of their legitimate existence in the United States.” • How they “exert social citizenship through consumption.” • Tim: what are their attitudes towards “foreigners”? • Tim: does immigrant church need to look more “middle- class” and “multi-cultural American”? 15
  • Consuming Citizenship • Lisa Sun-Hee Park, Consuming Citizenship: Children of Asian Immigrant Entrepreneurs (Stanford University Press, 2005) • Why do “second generation Asian Americans feel compelled to remind others of their legitimate existence in the United States.” • How they “exert social citizenship through consumption.” • Tim: what are their attitudes towards “foreigners”? • Tim: does immigrant church need to look more “middle- class” and “multi-cultural American”? • Tim: can they critique social system? 15
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? 16
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • Richard Petts and Anne Joliffe, quot;Race and Adolescent Depression: The impact of race and genderquot; Review of Religious Research (June 2008) 16
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • Richard Petts and Anne Joliffe, quot;Race and Adolescent Depression: The impact of race and genderquot; Review of Religious Research (June 2008) • quot;Most research has shown that religious participation ... is good and can be very helpful for battling depression. But our research has shown that this relationship does not hold true in all instancesquot; Richard Petts 16
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • Richard Petts and Anne Joliffe, quot;Race and Adolescent Depression: The impact of race and genderquot; Review of Religious Research (June 2008) • quot;Most research has shown that religious participation ... is good and can be very helpful for battling depression. But our research has shown that this relationship does not hold true in all instancesquot; Richard Petts • Asian American adolescents who never attended church reported 4 % fewer symptoms of depression in the preceding week than did their African-American peers. 16
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • Richard Petts and Anne Joliffe, quot;Race and Adolescent Depression: The impact of race and genderquot; Review of Religious Research (June 2008) • quot;Most research has shown that religious participation ... is good and can be very helpful for battling depression. But our research has shown that this relationship does not hold true in all instancesquot; Richard Petts • Asian American adolescents who never attended church reported 4 % fewer symptoms of depression in the preceding week than did their African-American peers. • Asian American youth who attended church at least once a week reported 20 to 27% more symptoms of depression than their white and African-American peers who attended at the same level. 16
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? 17
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • In stark contrast to white and African-American adolescents, Asian-American adolescents who never attended services and Latinos attending at intermediate levels were the least likely to be depressed within their groups. 17
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • In stark contrast to white and African-American adolescents, Asian-American adolescents who never attended services and Latinos attending at intermediate levels were the least likely to be depressed within their groups. • quot;Asian and Latino youth who are highly involved in a culturally distinct church may have a more difficult time balancing the beliefs of their family and their traditional culture with mainstream society. Their religious institution is telling them what should be important in their lives and how to behave, and mainstream society is saying something else.quot; [especially among girls] - Richard Petts 17
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? 18
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • quot;religious participation is positively related to depression for Asian adolescents (b = .596, p < .05), suggesting that Asians who attend religious services more frequently may experience cultural tension between traditional Asian culture and mainstream American culture, resulting in higher depression.quot; Petts and Joliffe, p. 14 18
  • Active Asian American Christian Teens more depressed? • quot;religious participation is positively related to depression for Asian adolescents (b = .596, p < .05), suggesting that Asians who attend religious services more frequently may experience cultural tension between traditional Asian culture and mainstream American culture, resulting in higher depression.quot; Petts and Joliffe, p. 14 • quot;Many Asian groups adhere to cultural principles that stress the importance of loyalty, hierarchy, and familial obligation [...]. These traditional attitudes often conflict with those of mainstream American society, which can create tension for Asian adolescents and lead to lower well-being [...]. If Asian youth attend religious services that reflect the traditionalism of their culture, then religiosity may add to the cultural tension, resulting in greater depression among Asians.quot; 18 Petts and Joliffe, p. 7.
  • Review of Religious Research 19
  • Review of Religious Research • At higher levels of participation, Asian-American and Latino adolescents had a harder time juggling which set of ideals to adopt because they were more involved and committed to their religion. 19
  • Review of Religious Research • At higher levels of participation, Asian-American and Latino adolescents had a harder time juggling which set of ideals to adopt because they were more involved and committed to their religion. • Meanwhile, Asian-American adolescents who had lower levels of involvement in church were able to focus more on life without worrying about conflicting ideals, resulting in lower depression. At lower levels of involvement, adolescents still gained the social support of their religious community while also feeling in touch with mainstream society, Petts said.s 19
  • Review of Religious Research 20
  • Review of Religious Research • But Latino teens who never attended church reported high levels of depression as well, reporting 26 to 28 % higher rate of depression symptoms than did white and African-American American youth. 20
  • Review of Religious Research • But Latino teens who never attended church reported high levels of depression as well, reporting 26 to 28 % higher rate of depression symptoms than did white and African-American American youth. • Religion is often an important part of social support for these adolescents and no involvement in their religion may leave these teens without a sense of connection to their community and culture, he said. 20
  • Review of Religious Research • But Latino teens who never attended church reported high levels of depression as well, reporting 26 to 28 % higher rate of depression symptoms than did white and African-American American youth. • Religion is often an important part of social support for these adolescents and no involvement in their religion may leave these teens without a sense of connection to their community and culture, he said. • quot;Participating to a certain extent may enable these youth to balance their lives better. They have a connection with a religious community and all the benefits it offers, but they are not so immersed that they're out of touch with mainstream society. So they're sort of getting the best of both worlds,quot; Petts said. 20
  • Review of Religious Research 21
  • Review of Religious Research • Sources: 21
  • Review of Religious Research • Sources: • Richard Petts and Anne Joliffe, quot;Race and Adolescent Depression: The impact of race and genderquot; Review of Religious Research (June 2008) http:// www.allacademic.com//meta/ p_mla_apa_research_citation/0/9/6/9/4/pages96940/ p96940-1.php 21
  • Review of Religious Research • Sources: • Richard Petts and Anne Joliffe, quot;Race and Adolescent Depression: The impact of race and genderquot; Review of Religious Research (June 2008) http:// www.allacademic.com//meta/ p_mla_apa_research_citation/0/9/6/9/4/pages96940/ p96940-1.php • Ohio State University (2008, September 4). Participating In Religion May Make Adolescents From Certain Races More Depressed. http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/ 2008/09/080903134209.htm 21
  • In Sum.... 22
  • In Sum.... • There are certain trends in American society that make it challenging for Asian American young adults to maintain commitment to an ethnic congregation. 22
  • In Sum.... • There are certain trends in American society that make it challenging for Asian American young adults to maintain commitment to an ethnic congregation. • There are different cultural expectations in each ethnic community that either encourage or discourage Asian American young adults in their commitments to an ethnic congregation. 22
  • In Sum.... • There are certain trends in American society that make it challenging for Asian American young adults to maintain commitment to an ethnic congregation. • There are different cultural expectations in each ethnic community that either encourage or discourage Asian American young adults in their commitments to an ethnic congregation. • There may be a mismatch between traditional theology and the cultural contexts of Asian American young adults. 22
  • In Sum.... • There are certain trends in American society that make it challenging for Asian American young adults to maintain commitment to an ethnic congregation. • There are different cultural expectations in each ethnic community that either encourage or discourage Asian American young adults in their commitments to an ethnic congregation. • There may be a mismatch between traditional theology and the cultural contexts of Asian American young adults. • There may be a lack of spiritual practice that helps young adults. Most spiritualities are for teenagers. 22
  • Now for the...
  • Now for the...
  • Now for the... • Watch for Asian Pacific American Religion Research Initiative conference aka APARRI (Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, August 6-8, 2009)
  • Now for the... • Watch for Asian Pacific American Religion Research Initiative conference aka APARRI (Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, August 6-8, 2009) • Contact Tim at: timtseng@isaacweb.org