Identity year 10

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Identity year 10

  1. 1. Example of homework My Identity Mind Map
  2. 2. The Human Skull
  3. 3. Planning out the basic lines
  4. 4. Step 4 Step 3 Step 2 Simple lines Step 1
  5. 5. ¾ View Challenge yourself
  6. 6. http://www.bbc.co.uk/ learningzone/clips/dra wing-shadingtechniques-to-addtone-and-the-illusionof-threedimensions/10006.htm l Adding Tone….areas of light and dark
  7. 7. http://www.bing.com/videos/search ?q=how+to+add+tone+to+a+drawin g&view=detail&mid=5DE71798311B 4EFD0C345DE71798311B4EFD0C34 &first=21&FORM=NVPFVR
  8. 8. Homework due: •Complete 1 pencil study of the skull from •Each should be A4 in size •Include : lots of different tones and marks
  9. 9. How To Draw a Self-Portrait
  10. 10. 1. Draw a grid on to your photo. 2. VERY LIGHTLY draw a grid in to your book 3. Look closely at what is in each square. 4. Copy the contents of each square in to the correct blank square in your book. 5. Start with light lines 6. Build up tones to give the illusion of 3D.
  11. 11. Homework due: •Practise drawing a tonal self portrait using dramatic lighting in pencil. Try holding the pencil in the sideways hold and layering tones. •Turn off the overhead, main lights and use a lamp/torch at a safe distance to create dramatic tones. •BE SAFE LAMPS GET VERY HOT •Obtain a clear photograph of yourself (head and shoulders) in black & white and print in A4. You will need this in the next lessson.
  12. 12. FRANCIS BACON (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish-born British figurative painter known for his bold, graphic and emotionally raw imagery.
  13. 13. Objective: Explore the potential of oil pastel to distort a self portrait Artist reference: Francis Bacon
  14. 14. Francis Bacon by Lucian Freud
  15. 15. Bacon's painterly but abstracted figures typically appear isolated in glass or steel geometrical cages set against flat, nondescript backgrounds. He began painting during his early 20s and worked only sporadically until his mid-30s. Before this time he drifted, earning his living as an interior decorator and designer of furniture and rugs. Later, he admitted that his career was delayed because he had spent too long looking for a subject that would sustain his interest. His breakthrough came with the 1944 triptych Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion, and it was this work and his heads and figures of the late 1940s through to the mid-1950s that sealed his reputation as a notably bleak chronicler of the human condition. Study for the Head of George Dyer (1966)
  16. 16. se oil pastel over your photograph IVE: To show evidence that you have looked at the artist’s technique and can reproduce it.
  17. 17. KEY THEME: THE SCREAM Bacon called the image of a screaming mouth a catalyst for his work, and incorporated the shape of the mouth when painting the chimera. Bacon's finding of the theme is examined in one of his first surviving works, Abstraction from the Human Form. By the early 1950s it became an obsessive concern, to the point, according to art critic and Bacon biographer Michael Peppiatt, "it would be no exaggeration to say that, if one could really explain the origins and implications of this scream, one would be far closer to understanding the whole art of Francis Bacon." The inspiration for the recurring motif of screaming mouths in many Bacons of the late 1940s and early 1950s was drawn from a number of sources, including medical text books, the works of Matthias Grünewald[51] and photographic stills of the nurse in the Odessa Steps scene in Sergei Eisenstein's 1925 silent The Battleship Potemkin. Bacon saw the film in 1935, and viewed it frequently thereafter. Still from Sergei Eisenstein's 1925 silent film The Battleship Potemkin
  18. 18. Extra information In his studio, he kept a photographic still of the scene which showed a close-up of the nurse's head screaming in panic and terror and with broken pincenez spectacles hanging from her blood-stained face. He referred to the image throughout his career, using it as a source of inspiration. One can relate this particular image to that of Nanny Lightfoot, as she, like the wounded nurse, wore the same oval spectacles. Extra information
  19. 19. Written annotations are vital for success at GCSE Provide detailed written answers to these questions: • • • • • • • what you have done and why you did it how you did it, such as the media and techniques used why you chose a particular medium or technique how an artwork fits in with your project what aspects you like how you could improve the work what you think you will do next • • • • Key words for Bacon annotation • • • • • distorted horror manipulate (paint and features of the face), exposed (the flesh, the inner identity, the painter’s innermost fears) Oil pastel (explain how they are similar and different to oil paint...research this yourself) • • • • • You must use the correct vocabulary when annotating your work to show that you are developing your knowledge, understanding and skills. Key terms are: Subject - what is shown in the artwork, such as a portrait or a still life Composition - how the elements of the work are arranged, ie whether they're close together or far apart Foreground and background - elements that appear to be in front or behind other aspects of the artwork Line - can vary in width, length, curvature, colour or direction Shape - describes the two-dimensional outline Form - describes a three-dimensional object Texture - the way surfaces look and feel, ie rough, smooth, soft, etc Tone - shading, from dark to light
  20. 20. Homework due: •Write about Francis Bacon Include •Biographical information •2 pictures of his work , with tiltes date and media info •Your opinion of his subject matter, style, use of media •Explain how it may link to your theme of identity
  21. 21. http://www.youtube.com/watch ?v=-MbKBMz0rv0 Walk in stimulus
  22. 22. Learning Objective: To learn about Chiaroscuro in paintings – looking at different styles and characteristics. Learning Outcomes: All students will be able to: 1. Identify when Chiaroscuro is used. 2. Mix a variety of paint tones. 3. Paint a self portrait creating Chiaroscuro effects. 4. Work with their peers to problem solve and analyse (BLP: noticing, questioning, making links, experimenting)
  23. 23. Chiaroscuro What do you know about it ?
  24. 24. Chiaroscuro What do you know about it ?
  25. 25. Chiaroscuro What do strong you know contrasts betweenit ? about light and dark
  26. 26. Chiaroscuro What do you know about it ? Tones strong contrasts between light and dark
  27. 27. Chiaroscuro using do What contrasts of light to achieve a you know sense of volume in about it ? threemodelling Tones dimensional objects strong contrasts between light and dark
  28. 28. The Boy with the Monkey By El Greco What is the direction of the light ?
  29. 29. What have they got in common? St Peter in Prison By Rembrandt Christ on the Mount of Olives By Goya 1819
  30. 30. Why is it appropriate to use chiaroscuro in religious paintings?
  31. 31. What about these images? Are they chiaroscuro?
  32. 32. http://www.youtube.com/watch ?v=3r8mxttLcT4 Painting with tones
  33. 33. Written annotations are vital for success at GCSE Provide detailed written answers to these questions: • • • • • • • what you have done and why you did it how you did it, such as the media and techniques used why you chose a particular medium or technique how an artwork fits in with your project what aspects you like how you could improve the work what you think you will do next • • • Key words for Chiaroscuro annotation • • • • • • Distorted tonal range Dramatic Contrast Density Shadow • • Caravaggio, El Greco, Rembrandt • Acrylic paint (explain how you created varied tones , and challenges or successes)...research this yourself) • • • • You must use the correct vocabulary when annotating your work to show that you are developing your knowledge, understanding and skills. Key terms are: Subject - what is shown in the artwork, such as a portrait or a still life Composition - how the elements of the work are arranged, ie whether they're close together or far apart Foreground and background - elements that appear to be in front or behind other aspects of the artwork Line - can vary in width, length, curvature, colour or direction Shape - describes the two-dimensional outline Form - describes a three-dimensional object Texture - the way surfaces look and feel, ie rough, smooth, soft, etc Tone - shading, from dark to light
  34. 34. Homework • Take 5 chiaroscuro photographs each from a different angle and with a different emotion. Print these out in black and white and stick in to your books. • Due in Friday 18th Oct • Lunch time help available today
  35. 35. Mono printing
  36. 36. Homework • Complete the mono print annotations and re do your print if necessary.
  37. 37. Written annotations are vital for success at GCSE Provide detailed written answers to these questions: • what you have done and why you did it • how you did it, such as the media and techniques used • why you chose a particular medium or technique • how an artwork fits in with your project • what aspects you like • how you could improve the work • what you think you will do next Key words for Monoprint annotation . Include these in your answers • It is a print process • linear (has lines) • Contrast Tonal (has varied values of light, medium , dark) • Layers ( has layers of drawn information) • Mark making (all the lines /tones you draw) Extension work Include images (including titles, dates etc) of artists work that uses this media (monoprint) Make sure the images you include ARE ACTUAL MONIPRINTS not drawings or other media Examples: Georg Baselitz, Tracey Emin, Rembrandt, Degas • • • • • • • • • You must use the correct vocabulary when annotating your work to show that you are developing your knowledge, understanding and skills. Key terms are: Subject - what is shown in the artwork, such as a portrait or a still life Composition - how the elements of the work are arranged, ie whether they're close together or far apart Foreground and background - elements that appear to be in front or behind other aspects of the artwork Line - can vary in width, length, curvature, colour or direction Shape - describes the two-dimensional outline Form - describes a three-dimensional object Texture - the way surfaces look and feel, ie rough, smooth, soft, etc Tone - shading, from dark to light
  38. 38. How to Analyse a Piece of Art Part 1 Describe the piece by conducting an analysis. Use the following questions and make notes (visual and written) using a visual vocabulary. Content What genre does the painting belong to? What is the subject matter? What is happening in the piece? Is the subject matter based on direct observation memory or imagination? Is the subject matter exaggerated, distorted or abstracted? Does the work have meaning is it obvious or is it hidden? Visual Qualities Describe the composition in terms of the visual elements- line, tone, shape, form, colour, pattern, texture, space, and size Is there a dominant colour? Is there a distinct shape to the composition? Is there a sense of movement or stillness? How has the artist arranged the elements and what is the effect of the arrangement? How does the composition fit the subject? What questions emerge?
  39. 39. How to Analyse a Piece of Art Part 2 Process How has the work been created (materials, techniques, tools)? Have these techniques been used for a particular reason? (Mood, atmosphere) What stages do you think the artist went through to create the work? How do you think the artist worked? Mood Does the painting suggest a mood feeling sensation or atmosphere to you? What qualities in the piece convey this? Suggest any similarities relating to your own experiences? Context Make connections with other works of art and the time in which the work was created. Does the work fit into any specific movement? Does the piece support any ideal? Was it made for a specific purpose? What is the artist trying to say? How is the work displayed? Are there any related pieces around it? Use descriptive language to articulate their thoughts. Your work should be a piece of prose supported by illustrations.
  40. 40. Art-Writing frame for a critical study When writing about a piece of art follow the following steps - Description, analysis, interpretation and evaluation. Structure Describe Describe what you see in the painting. Imagine that you are describing the artwork to someone who cannot see it (someone over the telephone) What to write Artist’s name Title of painting Date of the piece of work (if known) What is the subject matter of the picture? e.g. landscape(see Vocabulary) What movement/tradition/culture is it from? Write down your first impression of the piece of work. This might change once you understand more about it. What do you think the picture is about? Beauty? Nature? Emotions? Power? Prestige? History? Money? Faith? Useful starters The piece of art I have chosen to write about is called............. It was completed by……………. in ……………. It comes from the movement/culture of... (eg. Surrealism, impressionism) I think the work portrays …........... In the picture/piece of artwork I can see...... I think the artist is trying to say that... Useful Vocabulary Adverbs Adverbs typically Subject matter: landscape, answer still-life, figures, portrait, questions such fantasy, abstract, impressionist, as how?, in pattern, religious, seascape, what way?, surreal, symbolic when?, where?, suggests, conveys, conjures up, and to what recalls, recreates, when looked extent?. Use the list here at closely, from a distance throughout your work so your work is interesting to read
  41. 41. Analyse Start to describe in detail what you see in the picture. Try to write about how the artist has achieved certain effects. Use the art vocabulary for highest marks. Look at how the elements of art are used •Analyse (continued) In the foreground/middleWhat is in the foreground, middle- ground, background there is.... The focal point is...... ground and background? The piece is What medium has the artist used? painted/drawn/constructed (see vocabulary in last column) from.... Why have they chosen this This piece is made out of... material? The technique of ......has been How and where has line been used used. The artist may have (if at all)? used......to/because..... What do you think the texture is The lines used in the piece are...... like? The texture appears to be .... What types of brushstrokes/marks Therefore the piece looks....... or techniques have been used The marks/textures/brushstrokes What pattern has been used (if that have been used are... any)? What shapes/form have been used? The patterns are..... They create an .......... effect How and where has the artist The shapes/form in the work..... shown light and dark tones? The tone in the painting/piece How and where have they used is..... colour? Colours are.... The use of colours make the What are the main colours used? work look/make me feel...... Foreground, background, middle-ground, arrangement, composition, focal point. Eye line, proportion, scale Media: Oil paint, Chalk, Pencil, Watercolour, Acrylic paint, drawing printmaking, sculpture, wash, impasto, scraffito, glaze, digital media, collage, Lines: fluent, confident, rough, bold, powerful, geometric, light, free, flowing, scribble, broken, rounded, angular, delicate, Strong, Smooth, heavy, obvious, exaggerated, small, large, curved, Cross-hatching, Texture/pattern: Thick, soft, coarse, fine, smooth, shiny, rough, jiggered, splatter, flat, matt, simple, symmetric, repeat, uniform, stencil Shape/form: sculpted, sharp, uniform, repeat, symmetric, angular, geometric Tone: Bright, Dark, faded, smooth, Harsh, contrasting, intense, sombre, strong, powerful, grey, gradation, haze, shadow, highlight Colours: Soft, subtle, pastel, tonal, bright, pure, bold, murky, radiant, contrasting, harmonious, warm, cold, dull, gloomy, vibrant, vivid, intense, So so that to in order to because since Also Besides Comparatively Consequently
  42. 42. Interpret Your reaction Try to figure out what the artwork is about. All artworks are about something. Some are colour, subject matter, social or cultural issues. Some are not as easy to see what the artist was thinking. Evaluate/ Conclusion Come to a conclusion about the artwork based on what you have found out and your interpretations, What is the theme or subject of the work. What mood or emotions does it communicate What is the work about, what do you think it means Why do you think the artist created it I think the story behind this piece is.... I think the artist wanted us to feel/think..... I think the artist is trying to say that.... The piece of work makes me think of...... The work makes me ………. because ………………. Have your thoughts or feelings about the art work changed? How and why? What do you think/feel about the picture? Why do you like it or dislike it? How could the artist have improved or made it different? What have you learned from the piece of work that you might apply to your own I chose to write about this piece of work because..... I like/dislike this work because…… What works in this piece is... I have been inspired by this piece of work to see, feel, think, imagine, suggests, evokes, conveys, conjure up, recreates, observes, reflects, recalls, reminds me of, Happy, sad, sombre, alive, atmospheric, depressing, disturbing, exciting, expressive, fresh, humorous, imposing, nostalgic Further Elsewhere However In addition In comparison In contrast Instead Next Rather Similar Then Therefore
  43. 43. The information you need: 1. Background information Who made the image or artefact? What is it called? Where does it come from? What tradition/movement/culture does it belong to? 1. What can you see? Is the image realistic or abstract? Describe accurately what you see. 1. What materials, processes and techniques have been used? Materials: oil paint, collage, wood… Processes: painting, drawing, printmaking, sculpture, digital media Techniques: cross-hatching, wash, impasto, scraffito, glaze… 1. Meaning, mood and feeling. What do you think it is about? Does it have a story? Can you find out what the maker thought about when making this? 1. How have the different elements of art been used to create different effects/moods/feelings? How have the following been used Texture, shape, form, space, line, tone, colour, composition, objects, symbols, focal point, pattern… 1. What do you think of it? What do you like about it? Why? What don’t you like about it? Why? Why did you choose to write about it? What might you like to ask the artist/ maker? How might you take ideas to use in your own work? Sentences you could use: The piece of art I have chosen to write about is called… The artist/designer who made/painted this piece is… He/she lives/lived and works/worked in… It comes from the tradition/ movement/ culture of… (e.g. Chinese art, surrealism) In the picture I can see…/The sculpture looks like… In the background/middle ground/foreground there is… The piece is painted in…/drawn in…constructed from… /This piece is made out of… Materials have been used to create a powerful effect by… The technique of…has been used The artist may have used… The picture/sculpture makes me think of… I think the story behind the piece is… It makes me feel…/I think the viewer of the piece would feel…/I think the artist wanted us to feel… I think that the artist is trying to say that… Colours are…soft and subtle? pastel and tonal? bright and bold? The use of colour makes me feel … Lines and shapes are…rhythmic? chaotic? Colour/tone/line has been used effectively to create a…mood The composition/form/structure is … and … The artist has used…to… The painting/piece makes me feel…because of the… I chose to write about this piece because… Before I started looking closely at this piece I thought… Now I have looked more closely I think that… What I particularly like about this piece is…This is because…What works well in this piece is the… I like everything in this piece except…This is because… I would like to ask the artist/maker…why they chose…/what they were thinking about when…/who inspired them. I have been inspired by this work to experiment with..
  44. 44. Comparing the Work of Others to Identify the Similarities and Contrasts Name of Artist Movement Influenced by Influenced whom Audience Narrative Composition How does it embody the theme of identity? Extra category of your choice
  45. 45. Idea Development Write up journey to your final idea. How has experimentation with media, recording of ideas ( 1st and 2nd hand drawing, mind mapping and photography) and analysis of the work of other’s influenced your final outcome? AO1 AO2 AO3
  46. 46. Experimentation Log Write in detail about your media experiments. Include successes, areas for improvement and how this will influence your next step.
  47. 47. First Hand Observational Drawing Instructions 1. Set up a still life using contrasting objects of interest. Place the still life beside a natural light source to get the best play of reflected light. 2. Draw the basic contours of the still life shapes lightly in pencil in your sketchbook to form your composition. This rough sketch is now ready to add tonal shading. 3. Observe the play of light and dark on the surfaces of the still life objects and notice the light and dark contrasts before applying tone to your study. 4 .Use a good range of drawing pencils from 2H to 8B to be able to maximize the tonal quality of your pencil studies. The darkest grade of pencil to create the darkest tones is the 8B. The lightest tone can be achieved by using a grade 2H pencil. Use an eraser or the white of paper to show areas of reflected light. 5 .Shade in the darkest areas in your drawing by using an 8B and shade in exactly the shape of the shadow you see in the still life. Note where your lightest areas are and, with your 2H pencil, shade around an area of white reflected light. Work in the mid- and graduating tones from dark to light areas to add a range of tonal qualities to the drawing. 6. Use a range of shading techniques to create different effects. Hatching is where you shade with a series of lines in one direction, whereas cross-hatching is where you draw a second series of lines over the first section of hatching but in the opposite direction to create a box-like effect. Stippling is using a series of dots in close proximity to create shading and texture. Squiggling is the process of creating random squiggled marks to suggest pattern. Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_7679365_draw-using-pencil-art-gcse.html#ixzz2qe8wXA1J
  48. 48. Week 1 Introduction & Stimulus. Inform students to outline to this unit & outcomes. Discuss the theme & show how artists over the years have addressed this. Observe structure of the head. Use of PowerPoint History of & drawing techniques. Dept skull and A3 worksheets of skull studies. A4/A3 sketchbooks. Powerpoint. Studies of Human skull using line proportion & Tone in pencil. Activity Homework Complete 3 studies of the skull. Various viewpoints. A0’s A03 2 Proportions of the face. Demonstration. Pencils & mirrors. 3 4 Tone Looking at how artists have represented Tone in the face/ Charcoal studies. Demo on using charcoal & putty rubber techniques. . Studying sections of face & facial features. Links artist’s techniques & media. . Distortion. Make reference to artists, such as Escher. Jenny Saville. Francis Bacon. Monotone & 1 colour pencil. A3 size. Links to Photomontage scanning original drawings, use of Photoshop. Refer to work of D. Hockney. Students to observe own faces and use quality of line to show shape form & structure. On A2 cartridge paper students to produce own version from photo of all or part of their face Students to draw eyes, ears etc from artists visual using appropriate media & techniques. Use Tone & colour. By looking into concave/convex mirrors or reflective objects draw a self portrait using 1 colour pencil. Practise a self portrait using dramatic lighting in pencil & tone. Obtain a clear picture of self in Black & white. ¾ view of own face in charcoal. Expressive Self! Produce an A3 Self portrait of an expressive portrait. Work from a clear photo. Using students own photographs & imagery construct a photomontage self portrait. Higher ability students could manipulate the images using Photoshop techniques. Continue above. Research on Hockney’s photomontages. A03 A03 A03 5 .Practise for homework – Kettles, irons etc. 6 A03/1 A03/1 Week 7 8 Interim Assessment 9 10 11 12 13 14 Introduction & Stimulus. Gallery visit. Visit to the NPG . Ceramic workshop. Interim Evaluation Sheet Lino Printing Demonstration to cover H & S issues. 1 & 2 colour prints – printing on different surfaces/ quality of paper. Project brief set. Students to be introduced to 4 20thCentury/ Contemporary artists work. ( Attached brief) Research & planning. Developing ideas Developing ideas & refining final outcome. Final outcome Timed test of 5 hours + 5 hours of lesson time. Activity Students to gather drawing research etc and postcards for use back in school. Students to explore the work of Giacometti & construct a series of small heads to be positioned on long poles. Demonstration given on techniques to employ Students are to reflect on progress so far. Students to fill in an evaluation sheet in relation to assessment objectives. Teacher & Pupil to address issues & targets for next area of coursework. Students to be shown the German Expressionists woodcuts as inspiration. Develop ideas towards a Lino design. The whole or part of the face. .PowerPoint .Students to shown on relevant artists work. Possible outcomes. Handout with tasks and deadlines to be read through. work independently on project brief. Enhancing research & responding to 4 postcards on the theme of Identity. Complete Gallery follow up work ready for marking. Mount & display of final prints. Working through first task in handout. As Above A02 A03 A03 Homework A0’s A01 A02 AO’s 1 – 2 & 3 End of year examination piece. ( 10 hours in total) Students to self assess. Teacher assessment & feedback given. A01 A02 All A0’S
  49. 49. GCSE Interim Evaluation Sheet. Name : Unit : Form : Assessment Objective Criteria A01 Develop their ideas through investigations informed by contextual and other sources, demonstrating analytical and cultural understanding. A02 Refine their ideas through experimenting and selecting appropriate resources, media, materials, techniques and processes. A02 Record ideas, observations and insights relevant to their intentions in visual and/or other forms. A04 Present a personal informed and meaningful response demonstrating analytical and critical understanding, realising intentions and, where appropriate, making connections between visual, written, oral or other elements. Date: Project title: Evidence

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