Assignment: Final Report<br />for<br />Instructional Systems Recruiting Committee<br />and<br />Instructional Systems Alum...
IS Program representation at carefully selected recruiting events (both on- and off-campus) throughout the academic year
Contact of prospective students at various points in the admission process by specific ISRC, ISAACRC, IS program faculty m...
Finally, direct communication with prospective students should be carefully managed during the admission process.</li></ul...
Since the main indicator of meeting the business goal of increasing active students is not being met, it is logical that t...
On-campus recruiting occurs, but there are no visible goals or plans for improving performance from year to year. Classroo...
Currently funding is not secured so that the ISRC can attend conferences for the purpose of recruiting, so faculty attempt...
Corporate recruiting is not done at all.
Currently funding is not secured for recruiting in trade journals.
No one is responsible for the IS website. Because of this, the website is out of date, and there is not a formal procedure...
There is not a social media strategy for IS recruiting, and no one has been identified to own this process. </li></ul>The ...
How were these goals created? Are they given to you by the university, or does the committee create its own goals?
How do the IS Graduate Program Recruiting Committee and the IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee interact to wo...
How do you measure results or progress toward your goals?
What internal/external forces work for or against achievement of these goals?</li></ul>Approach<br />The business analysis...
Getting students to enroll in FSU IS once they are accepted
Determining student needs / values in a graduate program and specifically in an IS Program
Making sure marketing tools are effective and current (e.g. website)</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>Attract high qua...
Engage alumni in helping transition new students into the program and act as a sounding board for applicants
Raise awareness about our program to organizations and institutions that may reach potential students of our program
Promote the engagement of IS alumni in building a strong partnership with the Department which ultimately improves the Dep...
Generate ideas
Initiate some actions of our own if we can</li></ul>Mary Kate McKee cited the following goals for the ISRC:<br /><ul><li>2...
More local focus for Masters
Current Masters students for PhD (most domestic students come from Masters program)</li></ul>The following verbatim respon...
To recruit someone who is a strong “traditional” systems person
Increase enrollments by 5% each year
Make our IS program more well-known
Raise enrollment
Campus MS: to get a full class of 15- 25 per year
Online MS: more, more more!!!
Ph.D.: 10 – 15 per year, more domestic
Overall: Maintain or raise (esp @ MS level) standards</li></ul>What is not entirely clear when reviewing the responses, ho...
The website is a force against
More faculty response for and against
Funding is a force against</li></ul>Eric Sikorski:<br /><ul><li>Against: Money – ability to offer large scholarships
Against: Some uncertainty what ISD is beyond ISD community
For: authentic IS projects for students to work (e.g. LSI)
For: program has very strong reputation and rich history</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>For alumni, the obvious exte...
Ideas for banners to be used at recruiting events
Committee Tasking
Media
Recruiting Committee Meeting Agendas from April and August 2009
Volunteers for Recruiting</li></ul>Additional research was conducted on the ISRC’s Google site (http://sites.google.com/si...
Oct. 7, 2009 recruiting event information
IS Video Planning link
Contact log of prospective students
Graphics (not yet populated)
IS Banner (not yet populated)
IS Video Planning (not yet populated)
Marketing (not yet populated)
The websites of competing programs were also explored to gain insight into what other universities are doing to recruit ne...
A list of instructional systems (and/or related programs) contacts at different universities across the U.S. (2006)
Marketing strategy discussions to include costs of designing and distributing collateral information and costs of executin...
Samples of distributable collateral which promotes the program
Invoices from ASTD and other professional associations whose publications were used to promote the program
An early draft of a memo to FSU and other universities’ undergrad students promoting the program and inviting them to appl...
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Final paper, Performance Analysis, EME6691 Fall 2009

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  1. 1. Assignment: Final Report<br />for<br />Instructional Systems Recruiting Committee<br />and<br />Instructional Systems Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee<br />Team One<br />Laura Bryant<br />Lea Ann Gates<br />Alisa Jacobs<br />Gina Minks<br />Kendall St. Hilaire<br />Florida State University<br />Instructional Systems Program<br />EME6691: Performance Systems Analysis—Fall 2009<br />December 5, 2009<br />Contents TOC o " 1-3" h z u Executive Summary PAGEREF _Toc247773508 h 4Business Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773509 h 4Performance Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773510 h 4Gap Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773511 h 6Cause Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773512 h 6Intervention PAGEREF _Toc247773513 h 7Campus Recruiting PAGEREF _Toc247773514 h 7Conferences PAGEREF _Toc247773515 h 7Corporate Recruiting PAGEREF _Toc247773516 h 7Journals PAGEREF _Toc247773517 h 8IS Website Improvements PAGEREF _Toc247773518 h 8Social Media PAGEREF _Toc247773519 h 8Steam-line communication to prospective students PAGEREF _Toc247773520 h 8Business Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773521 h 10Purpose PAGEREF _Toc247773522 h 10Analysis Questions PAGEREF _Toc247773523 h 10Approach PAGEREF _Toc247773524 h 10Data Collection and Analysis Results PAGEREF _Toc247773525 h 10Specific Recruiting Goals PAGEREF _Toc247773526 h 11Recommended Business Goal PAGEREF _Toc247773527 h 13Creation of Goals PAGEREF _Toc247773528 h 13ISRC and ISAACRC Collaboration PAGEREF _Toc247773529 h 14Measurement of Goals PAGEREF _Toc247773530 h 15Internal and External Forces PAGEREF _Toc247773531 h 16Research Sources and Methods PAGEREF _Toc247773532 h 16Performance Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773533 h 19Purpose PAGEREF _Toc247773534 h 19Analysis Questions PAGEREF _Toc247773535 h 19Approach PAGEREF _Toc247773536 h 19Data Collection and Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773537 h 20Current Recruiting Practices PAGEREF _Toc247773538 h 20Recruiting Performed by the ISRC and ISAACRC PAGEREF _Toc247773539 h 20Information Gathered to Facilitate Recruiting Efforts PAGEREF _Toc247773540 h 22Current Recruiting Goals PAGEREF _Toc247773541 h 22ISRC and ISAACRC Interactions PAGEREF _Toc247773542 h 24Use of Information Gathered by the Recruiting Committees PAGEREF _Toc247773543 h 24Optimal Recruiting Practices PAGEREF _Toc247773544 h 25Competitiveness of FSU’s IS Program Compared to IS Programs of Other Universities PAGEREF _Toc247773545 h 27Performance Measures PAGEREF _Toc247773546 h 28Gap Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773547 h 33Purpose PAGEREF _Toc247773548 h 33Analysis Questions PAGEREF _Toc247773549 h 33Approach PAGEREF _Toc247773550 h 33Data Collection and Analysis Results PAGEREF _Toc247773551 h 33IS Program Recruiting PAGEREF _Toc247773552 h 33Performance Measures PAGEREF _Toc247773553 h 33Analysis of Gaps Related to Current Enrollment Numbers and Recruiting Activities PAGEREF _Toc247773554 h 36Analysis of Gaps Related to Communications with Prospective Students PAGEREF _Toc247773555 h 42Cause Analysis PAGEREF _Toc247773556 h 44Purpose PAGEREF _Toc247773557 h 44Analysis Questions PAGEREF _Toc247773558 h 44Approach PAGEREF _Toc247773559 h 44Analysis Results PAGEREF _Toc247773560 h 44Performance Measure 1: Number of Students Actively Enrolled each Academic Year PAGEREF _Toc247773561 h 44Performance Measure 2: IS Program Representation at Recruiting Events PAGEREF _Toc247773562 h 45Performance Measure 3: Contact of Prospective Students during the Admission Process PAGEREF _Toc247773563 h 49Intervention Recommendations PAGEREF _Toc247773564 h 51Recruiting Process PAGEREF _Toc247773565 h 51On-Campus Recruiting PAGEREF _Toc247773566 h 51Conferences PAGEREF _Toc247773567 h 52Corporate Recruiting PAGEREF _Toc247773568 h 52Journals PAGEREF _Toc247773569 h 52Website PAGEREF _Toc247773570 h 53Social Media PAGEREF _Toc247773571 h 53Contacting Prospective Students PAGEREF _Toc247773572 h 54Limitations and Constraints PAGEREF _Toc247773573 h 55<br />Executive Summary<br />The Instructional Systems Recruiting Committee (ISRC) is a committee is tasked to carry out recruiting efforts with the intent to market and attract strong applicants to the Instructional Systems (IS) Master’s and doctorate degree programs at Florida State University. The Instructional Systems Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee (ISAACRC) committee is comprised of IS alumni that work alongside the ISRC to improve the strength and reputation of the IS program at FSU.<br />The ISRC requested an analysis of the current recruiting processes. The ISRC representative recognized that to date the processes and procedures related to recruiting have not been formalized at a systems level. While there are some recruiting activities taking place, there has not a formal analysis performed to determine if the current processes are effective, or if there are formal programs that could be put in place to improve the recruiting process.<br />This report outlines the findings of Group 1 with regards to the current state of recruiting as they relate to the business goal of the ISRC and ISAACRC, performance measures that need to be in place to support the business goal, gaps between the current practices and the ideal recruiting performance, the cause for those gaps, and specific interventions that will help the committees reach the ideal recruiting performance level.<br />Business Analysis<br />Information about the current state of recruiting was collected by surveying the ISRC and ISAACRC committee members, IS faculty members, IS staff, current students, and alumni. Upon review of the data collected, it became apparent that neither the ISRC nor the ISAACRC have a specific, measurable recruiting goal. <br />The team was unable to clarify a business goal with the ISRC and ISAARC, because of the limitations and constraints encountered in this project (discussed in greater detail in the Limitations and Constraints section). To move forward with the analysis project, the team assumed the business goal of increasing active student enrollment by ten percent annually going forward, where active enrollment is defined as the number of IS program students actively enrolled in courses. Increasing active student enrollment was mentioned as a goal repeatedly in the surveys and interviews conducted with the ISRC, the ISAACRC, and the faculty (see the Business Analysis Section). The percentage was based on research of current and past recruiting efforts and enrollment data collected from the past five academic years.<br />Performance Analysis<br />It was unclear from the research how the ISRC measures student enrollment. Currently their recruitment process for the IS program is divided into two categories: proactive recruitment and on-campus activities. In an effort to recruit potential students from an outward-bound approach, recruitment is conducted as on-campus outreach. All other recruitment activities appear to take place after a prospective student completes an application to the graduate program or makes a request for more information after visiting the IS website. The planned communication with prospective students seems to be unbalanced, with most of the contact occurring after the individual has expressed interest in the IS program. <br />In order for the recruiting committees to meet the business goal of increasing active enrollment by ten percent each year, the committees should consider the following performance goals: <br /><ul><li>Number of students actively enrolled each academic year
  2. 2. IS Program representation at carefully selected recruiting events (both on- and off-campus) throughout the academic year
  3. 3. Contact of prospective students at various points in the admission process by specific ISRC, ISAACRC, IS program faculty member, and IS students</li></ul>To achieve these performance goals, the committees must undertake several recruitment initiatives. First of all, the number of active students must be measured, as it is the key performance measure that will indicate if recruiting is effective. Recruiting efforts should be formalized, and annual goals should be establish to measure the efficiency of these efforts. <br />The formal recruiting program should include the following elements:<br /><ul><li>ElementSpecific measurementsOn-campus recruitingVisit diverse undergraduate classrooms to promote the IS programParticipate in spring and fall recruiting, as well as GradQuestConferencesFunding should be secured for attending conferences for recruiting purposesA packet to market the IS program should be created so that staff, faculty, students, and alumni who attend conferences have a tool with which to recruit potential students. A mentoring program to ensure everyone participating in recruiting activities properly represents the IS program brandCorporate RecruitingA formal plan for recruiting from employees of corporations should be institutedJournal AdvertisingFunding should be secured to advertise in trade journals such as T&D and CLO MagazineIS WebsiteThe website should be overhauled and updated on a regular basisSocial MediaA social media strategy should be developed to expand the reach of the recruiting efforts of the ISRC and the ISAACRC
  4. 4. Finally, direct communication with prospective students should be carefully managed during the admission process.</li></ul>Gap Analysis<br />During the performance analysis phase, three broad performance goals were established in order to meet the organization’s goal of increasing the number of students actively enrolled each academic year. <br /><ul><li>The first performance goal that will measure the success of meeting the goal of increasing active student enrollment is measuring the number of active students. Based on most recent data for 2008/2009, this will mean an increase of 7 Master’s students and 4 Ph.D. students. From data collected in years 2004 through 2009, there is a 30% gap of Master’s students (101 optimal versus 72 actual), and a 17% gap of Ph.D. students (54 optimal versus 45 actual).
  5. 5. Since the main indicator of meeting the business goal of increasing active students is not being met, it is logical that the performance goals set for recruiting are also most likely not being met.
  6. 6. On-campus recruiting occurs, but there are no visible goals or plans for improving performance from year to year. Classroom visits are done in an ad hoc manner by faculty, and only to one major.
  7. 7. Currently funding is not secured so that the ISRC can attend conferences for the purpose of recruiting, so faculty attempt to recruit at the conferences they attend.
  8. 8. Corporate recruiting is not done at all.
  9. 9. Currently funding is not secured for recruiting in trade journals.
  10. 10. No one is responsible for the IS website. Because of this, the website is out of date, and there is not a formal procedure to update its content.
  11. 11. There is not a social media strategy for IS recruiting, and no one has been identified to own this process. </li></ul>The process used by ISRC, ISAACRC, IS program faculty members and IS students to communicate with prospective students is somewhat disorganized. There are several initial contacts at the beginning of the admission process, and then communication with prospective students gradually reduces. <br />Cause Analysis<br />The reason that there has not been a 10% increase in the number of active students may be that there was a transition in the ownership of the recruiting program. During the transition, there was a two-year gap during which there was no recruiting conducted at all. This may have had an impact on the number of active students enrolled in the program.<br />Another reason that the number of active students has stagnated may be that the current recruiting activities are conducted in an ad-hoc manner, and they seem to be limited primarily to on-campus recruiting. The IS Program conducts a limited number of on-campus recruiting activities and/or events. Also, FSU’s IS Program does not formally recruit students at conferences due to lack of funds. Faculty and staff, however, attend a limited number of conferences and recruiting events on an ad hoc basis.<br />Additionally, the IS Program does not recruit potential students from the corporate field. Unfortunately, this issue has not been addressed so no one has taken the responsibility to pursue it further.<br />FSU’s IS Program does not advertise in trade publications because the marketing budget does not allocate sufficient funds to cover the associated costs. <br />The IS Program website is not regularly updated, and the lack of recent information reflects poorly on the state of the program. There is no apparent process or responsibility for updating the site. No reporting is done on the number of visits to the IS website, or how prospective students find the program’s website. This is a critical issue, as this may be the first point of contact for potential students.<br />Finally, social media sites are not being used consistently to recruit potential students and network with those who could spread the word about the IS program. There is no apparent delegation of duties for this area. <br />Intervention<br />The primary intervention that can be undertaken to increase the number of students actively enrolled in the IS program is to create a formal recruiting process. As many of the suggested interventions currently exist in an ad hoc manner, the interventions recommend formalizing these activities. The new suggestions include recruiting at corporations and using social media for recruiting purposes.<br />Campus Recruiting<br />A process should be created to plan, organize, and record all campus recruiting activities. Each activity should be reviewed after it has been executed, and the results should be used to plan for and improve future recruiting events. A diverse list of FSU undergraduate majors should be visited each year by faculty, students, and alumni to advertise the purpose and benefits of the IS graduate and doctorate program.<br />Conferences<br />Conferences are an important place to have contact with potential students, as well as individuals who can suggest the IS program to potential students. However, attendance at conferences should be planned both for faculty/staff, as well as students. Research into potential conferences should be conducted and funds should be allocated to attend conferences for recruiting purposes. The current set of ad hoc documentation should be analyzed and used as the basis for a recruiting packet that can be used by any faculty member, alumni, or student attending a conference.<br />Corporate Recruiting<br />Corporations with HR and Learning organizations may be interested in funding the advanced education of their workers. The employees of many corporations are paid to complete a higher education or certificate program. Targeting a population who have already secured funding for their continuing education is surely a way to meet the over-all business goal of increasing active student enrollment. <br />A target list of these companies could be constructed using the following information sources:<br />1. Current Students<br />2. Alumni<br />3. Companies that recruit from the program<br />4. Winners of training and development awards (e.g. Training magazine’s Top 125, CLO awards)<br />A packet targeting corporate workers should be compiled and made available on the IS website. Additionally, five companies should be targeted annually for recruiting purposes and presented with information that has been prepared for especially for corporate leaders. These presentations do not have to be made in person; in fact it may be more desirable to demonstrate the department’s ability to interact with remote audiences using technology. Finally, these relationships should be nurtured and maintained from year to year.<br />Journals<br />Advertising in print journals is expensive, but it would help to achieve the business goal of increasing student enrollment. Money should be set aside to advertise in print journals four times a year.<br />IS Website Improvements<br />One of the biggest complaints of students, faculty, and alumni cited in the team’s research had to do with the website. The website is out of date, and could do a better job at explaining the IS program. The current state of the website may actually discourage prospective students from engaging in the recruiting process. Our research did not find any information on the number of visits to the site annually. This number should be determined, and a goal should be set to increase the number by 30% each year. <br />One way to increase visits is to improve the website’s Search Engine Optimization (SEO). The goal should be to come up in the number one position in a Google search for the following searches: “ISD graduate programs,” “HPT graduate programs,” “ISD Ph.D. programs,” and “HPT Ph.D. programs”. <br />An easy way to increase SEO is to have current content. Content such as the IS Recruiting schedule, current research projects, and the upcoming conference attendance schedule for faculty, staff, and students should be posted on the IS website. In addition to increasing SEO, this information shows individuals that the IS program is vibrant and active, and this should encourage them to engage in the recruiting process. Additionally, social media information such as a Facebook page, a LinkedIn group, a Twitter account, and a YouTube channel should be published. This will give prospective students another view into the department and using widgets from these social media sites can help keep the pages of the website fresh. The YouTube channel can be used to host videos that will encourage prospective students to apply to the program.<br />Social Media<br />Social media is an inexpensive way to connect with prospective students. Social media is not currently used in a proactive, strategic way for recruiting and should be integrated into the website. <br />A Twitter account should be actively used to build a network of individuals interested in the IS program, as well as to search for individual who are looking for graduate or doctorate programs. The Facebook page should be used strategically to advertise recruiting events, as well as other IS program activities that would attract prospective students. LinkedIn is a network of professional people, and the ISRC should establish an official LinkedIn group to connect with other IS and HPT professionals. Finally, the ISRC should be active on the alumni Ning site.<br />The responsibility of the website and social media maintenance should be delegated to one person. We recommend finding undergraduate interns who are interested in obtaining real world experience to maintain the website and social media. The interns should be managed by an IS faculty member.<br />Steamline communication to prospective students<br />Prospective students are over-contacted by stakeholders. A more strategic, managed approach to contact initiated from the IS department would make a more professional impression on these individuals. The process of initiating communications to prospective students should be re-engineered and managed by the ISRC.<br />Conclusion<br />As discovered during the Business Analysis phase of this project, IS program enrollment has increased <br />14.8 percent over the past five academic years (from a total of 304 active enrollments for the 2004-05 academic year to 349 for the 2008-09 academic year). This increase occurred despite a lack of formal recruiting practices in the past two years, and a lack of leadership for the recruiting committee for two years prior to that. With the implementation of formal recruiting processes, and expansion of these processes to include new territory such as corporate recruiting and social media, the team is confident that the proposed goal of increasing overall IS student enrollment by ten percent annually is attainable.<br />Business Analysis<br />Purpose<br />The purpose of the business analysis is to identify key organizational goals, and in the case of this project, the most important goals of the FSU Instructional Systems (IS) program recruiting committee. Once identified, the goals were evaluated to determine their appropriateness in terms of being measurable, specific, time-bound, output-focused, and relevant to the organization. <br />Analysis Questions<br />Specific questions were posed during the business analysis. Each of these questions related to the organizational goals. It was vital to understand what the organization wants to accomplish. Questions for the business analysis phase included:<br /><ul><li>What are the specific goals/needs of the IS Recruiting Committee (ISRC)? As you list the goals, please rank them in order from most important to least important.
  12. 12. How were these goals created? Are they given to you by the university, or does the committee create its own goals?
  13. 13. How do the IS Graduate Program Recruiting Committee and the IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee interact to work toward these goals?
  14. 14. How do you measure results or progress toward your goals?
  15. 15. What internal/external forces work for or against achievement of these goals?</li></ul>Approach<br />The business analysis was conducted through research, interviews, and surveys. Research on the current practices and the history of recruiting for the IS program was conducted to put current efforts and challenges in the context of what has been successful in recent history.<br />An initial interview with Dr. Tristan Johnson, current chair of the recruiting committee, was held in order to identify stakeholders with whom to consult. After identifying key stakeholders, interviews and surveys were used to collect data from members of the Instructional Systems Recruiting Committee and members of the IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee. When one member of the Alumni committee, Marguerite Foxon, became unavailable for interview, Team One exchanged survey data for Team Three’s notes from an interview with Ms. Foxon.<br />Data Collection and Analysis Results<br />Data was collected to determine the Instructional Systems Recruiting Committee’s current goals and challenges in the context of the recent history of recruiting for the program. Dr. Tristan Johnson, current chair of the recruiting committee, was interviewed to learn about current recruiting practices, goals, and challenges. After interviewing Dr. Johnson, research was conducted on the recruiting committee’s wiki (http://fsu-instsys-recruitingcomm.wikispaces.com/) to understand how the current recruiting committee works. In addition, Dr. John Keller, former chair of the recruiting committee from 2005 – 2006, was interviewed to gain some knowledge about how recruiting was conducted in the past.<br />Based on information obtained from Dr. Johnson and Dr. Keller, a picture of recruiting over the past several years came together as demonstrated in Figure 1.<br />FIGURE 1: IS PROGRAM RECRUITING LEADERSHIP HISTORY<br />History of the IS Recruiting Program 2004 2006 2009Dr. Reiser2006 and earlierIS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee currently reports to Dr. ReiserDr. Johnson2009 – current2009: added Recruiting Coordinator position (currently held by Christie Suggs)Dr. Keller2004 – 2006Jim Russell (former faculty)MS AssistantRhett BrymerConsulted with Reinhart Lerch (ODDL)Gap in leadership<br />The team conducted interviews with members of the IS recruiting committee and the IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee. The individuals interviewed include Mary Kate McKee (Program Coordinator), Eric Sikorski (M.S./Ph.D. recipient, member of Alumni committee), and Christie Suggs (Ph.D. student, Recruiting Coordinator and Vice-President of Student Relations for the Instructional Systems Student Association). In addition, Dr. John Keller, Chair of the IS recruiting committee from 2004 through 2006, was interviewed.<br />Additionally, Teams One and Three exchanged information collected during this phase: Team Three interviewed Marguerite Foxon and provided the information obtained during that interview with Team One, and Team One provided responses to the surveys they deployed to Team Three. A survey was created and deployed to select faculty within the Instructional Systems department – specifically including those who currently have or have in the past had responsibility for recruiting activities. (Two additional surveys were created and deployed – one to current students, and another to program alumni. Results of these surveys will be discussed in the performance analysis and subsequent project documents.)<br />Specific Recruiting Goals<br />In each interview or survey, members of the IS Recruiting Committee and IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee were asked to articulate the recruiting goals for the IS program. In general, a common goal of increasing enrollment is present.<br />ISRC and ISAACRC members and IS program faculty responded to the question, “What are the specific goals of the recruiting committee?” during interviews and in surveys distributed by the team. Verbatim responses received from the IS Recruiting Committee Survey included:<br />Christie Suggs:<br /><ul><li>Only goal – get as many students as we can get</li></ul>Erik Sikorski:<br /><ul><li>Main goal: Increase student enrollment in the IS program
  16. 16. Getting students to enroll in FSU IS once they are accepted
  17. 17. Determining student needs / values in a graduate program and specifically in an IS Program
  18. 18. Making sure marketing tools are effective and current (e.g. website)</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>Attract high quality students to our Masters and Ph. D. programs
  19. 19. Engage alumni in helping transition new students into the program and act as a sounding board for applicants
  20. 20. Raise awareness about our program to organizations and institutions that may reach potential students of our program
  21. 21. Promote the engagement of IS alumni in building a strong partnership with the Department which ultimately improves the Departments ability to recruit high quality students</li></ul>Greg Stevens:<br /><ul><li>The goal is somewhat vague. However, generally it is to help the ISD program meet its recruiting targets.</li></ul>In an interview Team Three conducted with Marguerite Foxon, she shared the following response to the same question:<br /><ul><li>Support recruiting efforts for the IS program
  22. 22. Generate ideas
  23. 23. Initiate some actions of our own if we can</li></ul>Mary Kate McKee cited the following goals for the ISRC:<br /><ul><li>25 students a year
  24. 24. More local focus for Masters
  25. 25. Current Masters students for PhD (most domestic students come from Masters program)</li></ul>The following verbatim responses relating to the recruiting goals were derived from an anonymous survey conducted with IS program faculty participants:<br /><ul><li>Get more F2F masters students and more domestic doctoral students
  26. 26. To recruit someone who is a strong “traditional” systems person
  27. 27. Increase enrollments by 5% each year
  28. 28. Make our IS program more well-known
  29. 29. Raise enrollment
  30. 30. Campus MS: to get a full class of 15- 25 per year
  31. 31. Online MS: more, more more!!!
  32. 32. Ph.D.: 10 – 15 per year, more domestic
  33. 33. Overall: Maintain or raise (esp @ MS level) standards</li></ul>What is not entirely clear when reviewing the responses, however, is what increased enrollment means – is it five percent or five students, and at what level(s) – Masters or Ph.D. – is that increase needed? Some answers did present the specificity needed in order to have measurable goals, but others were lacking. The team also reviewed enrollment numbers from the past five academic years (see Figure 2).<br />FIGURE 2: ENROLLMENT HISTORY OF IS PROGRAM SINCE ACADEMIC YEAR 2004<br />Enrollments, as measured in Figure 2, are the number of students actively taking courses in the IS program. Between Academic Years 2004-2005 and 2006-2007, combined Master’s and Ph.D. enrollment changed little. Academic Year 2007-2008 saw an increase of approximately eight percent. The following academic year, enrollment increased nearly eight percent once more.<br />Recommended Business Goal<br />After reviewing the responses by the interviewees and survey participants, the team recommends the following shared goal for the ISRC and ISAACRC:<br /><ul><li>Achieve a ten percent increase from year to year in the number of students actively enrolled in courses that ultimately yield an advanced degree in Instructional Systems.</li></ul>This goal is specific, measurable, time-bound, and appropriate. Its output can be documented through student enrollment numbers.<br />Also noteworthy is that the IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee does not appear to have its own goal(s) relative to recruiting efforts. Dr. Foxon indicated this committee exists to “support” the IS Program Recruiting Committee, but in the notes received from Team Three’s interview with her, that goal lacks specificity. It is recommended that the ISAACRC create an appropriate goal for how it will support the ISRC in future recruiting efforts.<br />Creation of Goals<br />The consensus is for the committee to create the recruiting goal while remaining accountable to Dean Driscoll and the University as noted in one of the responses from the ISRC survey referenced above.<br />Clarifying the origin of the goal may provide valuable context to all committee members, and lead to meaningful discussion about the goal.<br />On the ISRC survey, committee members were asked “Did the committee or the University create these goals?” Verbatim responses included:<br />Christie Suggs:<br /><ul><li>Committee</li></ul>Eric Sikorski:<br /><ul><li>My understanding is that increasing student enrollment is a goal at every level: University, college, department, and program. We are not at desired enrollment and the directive has come from Dean Driscoll to increase this enrollment, especially with the desire to hire new faculty.</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>The committee created the goals in partnership with current Department faculty and student representation.</li></ul>Greg Stevens:<br /><ul><li>The committee did with assistance from Dr. Reiser. The ISD department sets the specific recruiting goals.</li></ul>As a follow-up question to the ISRC, committee members were asked “Who is held accountable for reaching these goals and in what way do they contribute to reaching them?” The verbatim responses received included:<br />Christie Suggs:<br /><ul><li>Christie and Tristan, by emailing, advertising, and holding events.</li></ul>Eric Sikorski:<br /><ul><li>My perception is that Dean Driscoll would be held accountable to the university, and Vanessa Dennen (IS program leader) and the faculty to Dean Driscoll. Faculty participates in recruiting and communicating with accepted students. Formed recruiting committee.</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>The chair of each alumni council committee is held accountable for monitoring the progress of each subcommittee/team. The committees work with faculty and students to ensure objectives are obtained.</li></ul>Greg Stevens:<br /><ul><li>From a committee standpoint, the chairperson is accountable to Dr. Reiser.</li></ul>ISRC and ISAACRC Collaboration<br />When queried about collaboration between the ISRC and the ISAACRC, there was not a recurrent theme among the responses to this question. However, several individuals were identified as key liaisons between the two committees. It appears that there is an opportunity to more clearly define how these two committees interact, and their purpose in working together. <br />On the ISRC Survey, committee members were asked “How do the graduate program committee and the alumni advisory council recruiting committee interact to work toward these goals? The following responses were received:<br />Christie Suggs:<br /><ul><li>Christie is the liaison, funnels everything through Mary Kate</li></ul>Eric Sikorski:<br /><ul><li>Never have been too sure on this. There is some overlap, like Marguerite and me asked to participate in on campus recruiting organized by graduate program committee. I think Marguerite is kept in the loop for the grad committee and keeps them in the loop of our activities but have to ask her.</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>Each committee has a chair that is responsible for tracking the progress of each subcommittee and reports back to the alumni council.</li></ul>Greg Stevens:<br /><ul><li>We interact on a very informal basis. Some of the coordination between the two committees comes through Dr. Reiser. We do try to support one another’s efforts. One example is when welcome emails are sent to students who are admitted to the program. The ISSA, the Faculty Advisory, and the Alumni Council all send welcome emails to the students. Before emails were sent this year, the three entities shared an example of their email so that they were complementary to one another.</li></ul>Measurement of Goals<br />When asked about how progress and results were measured, no specific measures were indicated in the responses given. Although one respondent pointed to individual measures for each deliverable, specific deliverables were not offered. There continues to be a lack of specificity around the responses given, and as such, the team believes there is an opportunity to communicate the goal to the members of both the ISRC and ISAACRC. Putting the specifics around the recruiting goal will enable the members to track progress and measure success.<br />On the ISRC survey, committee members were asked “How do you measure results or progress toward your goals?” The following responses were received:<br />Christie Suggs:<br /><ul><li>They are not measured, Tristan and I cannot attribute increases or decreases to their efforts because economy now could play a role, would have to explore that once they are admitted with a survey</li></ul>Eric Sikorski:<br /><ul><li>No established measures other than student enrollment numbers (Ph.D., Masters FTF and online). Bob Reiser presents these numbers to the alumni advisory council (including recruitment committee) every year.</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>Each goal is different and measured based on the completion of a deliverable.</li></ul>Greg Stevens:<br /><ul><li>At the annual Alumni Council meeting, the number of students enrolled in the various programs is shared. During the year, numbers are shared informally by Mary Kate and Dr. Reiser. The actual contribution of the Alumni Council’s Recruiting Committee is not measured as its efforts are just one of many variables that contribute to an individual student’s enrollment.</li></ul>Internal and External Forces<br />The program’s history and reputation, along with the work conducted by Mary Kate McKee, were cited as the forces contributing to the goals. The website was mentioned on this survey and during other interviews as a force working against the recruiting goals. Funding was mentioned by two individuals who responded to the ISRC survey. It was also cited as the most significant need by 60% of those responding to the Faculty Survey deployed by the team. Others mentioned time was a challenge – both for faculty and alumni.<br />When asked “What internal/external forces work for or against achievement of these goals?” the ISRC committee members surveyed responded as follows:<br />Christie Suggs:<br /><ul><li>Mary Kate is an internal force for
  34. 34. The website is a force against
  35. 35. More faculty response for and against
  36. 36. Funding is a force against</li></ul>Eric Sikorski:<br /><ul><li>Against: Money – ability to offer large scholarships
  37. 37. Against: Some uncertainty what ISD is beyond ISD community
  38. 38. For: authentic IS projects for students to work (e.g. LSI)
  39. 39. For: program has very strong reputation and rich history</li></ul>Darren Brooks:<br /><ul><li>For alumni, the obvious external force is time. Most alumni work full-time and possibly have family or other commitments that allow only a limited amount of time. Also, proximity from the University may be a hindrance to getting access to certain resources. This is where we rely on students and faculty to assist.</li></ul>Greg Stevens:<br /><ul><li>Probably the greatest external force against achievement of the goals is the limited funding that FSU provides to graduate students. A survey was conducted last year of prospective students who were accepted but declined to enroll in the ISD program. The survey results showed that funding was a large influencing factor in a student’s decision. Internally, a force against is a lack of time and a lack of connectedness after the annual meeting.</li></ul>Research Sources and Methods<br />Research was conducted on the Florida State University—Instructional Systems Graduate Program—Recruiting Committee wiki (http://fsu-instsys-recruitingcomm.wikispaces.com/) to understand how the recruiting committee works. The purpose of the wiki is primarily to support the efforts of the IS Recruiting Committee. The items contained within this wiki include:<br /><ul><li>Flyers
  40. 40. Ideas for banners to be used at recruiting events
  41. 41. Committee Tasking
  42. 42. Media
  43. 43. Recruiting Committee Meeting Agendas from April and August 2009
  44. 44. Volunteers for Recruiting</li></ul>Additional research was conducted on the ISRC’s Google site (http://sites.google.com/site/isrecruitingcommittee/home). This site includes information about:<br /><ul><li>Oct. 20, 2009 recruiting event information
  45. 45. Oct. 7, 2009 recruiting event information
  46. 46. IS Video Planning link
  47. 47. Contact log of prospective students
  48. 48. Graphics (not yet populated)
  49. 49. IS Banner (not yet populated)
  50. 50. IS Video Planning (not yet populated)
  51. 51. Marketing (not yet populated)
  52. 52. The websites of competing programs were also explored to gain insight into what other universities are doing to recruit new students to their programs.</li></ul>Also, documentation related to recruiting activities for the last few years was reviewed. This information was included in a series of documents that include the following items:<br /><ul><li>Memos exchanged between department members and alumni that address student survey and results from 2006 and requesting their assistance in recruiting potential IS grad
  53. 53. A list of instructional systems (and/or related programs) contacts at different universities across the U.S. (2006)
  54. 54. Marketing strategy discussions to include costs of designing and distributing collateral information and costs of executing marketing campaigns at different venues
  55. 55. Samples of distributable collateral which promotes the program
  56. 56. Invoices from ASTD and other professional associations whose publications were used to promote the program
  57. 57. An early draft of a memo to FSU and other universities’ undergrad students promoting the program and inviting them to apply for admission to the IS program
  58. 58. A listing of potential advertising venues for the IS program (2005)
  59. 59. A listing of low-cost/no-cost ideas for recruiting students
  60. 60. A report to faculty about the recruitment activities being proposed and a review of recruitment committee work (Jan, Feb 2005)
  61. 61. Recruitment options costs listing (2004-2005)
  62. 62. Notes and plan for recruitment event scheduled for March 2008
  63. 63. Suggested recruitment activities (2004)
  64. 64. Deck used for IS recruitment event in 2005
  65. 65. Notes from recruitment meeting in January 2005
  66. 66. Memo from February 2006 directed to faculty and the alumni committee to go over recruitment activities and a partnership with Human Resources to share costs
  67. 67. A listing of suggestions of potential recruitment tasks from the alumni in the committee (2004 & 2006)</li></ul>Although all of this documentation is too lengthy to include in this report, it will be included in a separate file along with all data collected for the project to date.<br />Research performed relative to how other universities attract potential students to their competing programs yielded some additional data to be considered. Although information about the recruiting efforts of these universities was not readily available, the team was able to learn a bit about what these universities offer to potential students to their programs. This information is worth evaluating in the context of what FSU IS students indicated was important to them in selecting the program they would attend. These factors included cost, strength of the curriculum, access to faculty and more. The information collected about competing programs is presented in the appendix, and will be analyzed in relation to the alumni and current student surveys in future analysis documents.<br />Performance Analysis<br />Purpose<br />The purpose of the performance analysis is to determine the current state and optimal state of how recruiting is conducted. The responsibilities of the members of each organization were explored in order to determine if the performance requirements are linked to desirable goals. In order to benchmark the IS Program’s success, research was conducted to study how competing universities conduct recruiting. Following analysis of current performance and research of recruiting practices at other universities, the team worked to outline optimal performance requirements that would enable the ISRC and ISAACRC to meet the recommended business goal of increasing active student enrollment by ten percent annually.<br />Analysis Questions<br />Team One used the data collected from key stakeholders to answer the following questions about the IS program:<br /><ul><li>How is recruiting currently executed?
  68. 68. What steps would an ideal recruiting process include?
  69. 69. During the analysis phase, the data collected about program competition, program recruiting history, how recruiting is currently accomplished, and best practices for accomplishing recruiting was analyzed to answer the following questions:
  70. 70. What are the current recruitment goals?
  71. 71. How is recruiting currently executed at FSU?
  72. 72. How do the IS Recruiting Committee (ISRC) and the IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee (ISAACRC) interact to recruit new students?
  73. 73. What sort of information is gathered to facilitate the recruitment efforts?
  74. 74. How is the information gathered by the recruiting committees used?
  75. 75. How can the recruiting committees increase awareness of the program to prospective students in the United States and abroad?
  76. 76. How competitive is FSU’s IS program in comparison to IS programs of other universities?</li></ul>Approach<br />Team One conducted the performance analysis by reviewing survey data from the recruitment committee and IS program faculty that discussed several aspects of the recruiting process. Individuals directly involved in the recruiting process were also interviewed. Alumni surveys were used to gather suggestions for future recruiting success. Based on initial data collection results, research was performed in an attempt to learn more about the competition as well as how other universities perform recruiting.<br />An initial interview with Dr. Tristan Johnson, current chair of the recruiting committee, was held in order to identify stakeholders with whom to consult. After identifying key stakeholders, interviews and surveys were used to collect data from members of the Instructional Systems Recruiting Committee and members of the IS Alumni Advisory Council Recruiting Committee.<br />The analysis provided the information required to create organizational charts for the ISRC and the ISAACRC, a relationship map to illustrate how each organization currently conducts recruiting, and a process map to show what the ideal recruiting process would look like.<br />The analysis also illuminated other areas that need more research. These include more time available to research the recruiting processes of competing universities and more time to offer participants for completing the surveys.<br />Data Collection and Analysis<br />Currently, there are two groups that recruit for the IS program. The following information was collected during the business analysis phase, and was analyzed to answer the performance questions. The data is broken down into two categories based on how the groups currently recruit students and the ideal state of recruiting.<br />Current Recruiting Practices<br />The current state of recruiting was determined based on interviews with members of the ISRC and the ISAACRC (see Figure 3). The only outward-bound recruiting currently conducted is on-campus outreach. All other activities occur after a prospective student either applies to the university or requests more information about the IS program through the university admissions site.<br />FIGURE 3: CURRENT RECRUITING PROCESS<br />Recruiting Performed by the ISRC and ISAACRC<br />The ISRC is chaired by Dr. Tristan Johnson. Christie Suggs, a PhD student, assists him as IS Recruiting Coordinator. Mary Kate McKee, IS staff member, also works with the ISRC to recruit students (see Figure 4). <br />FIGURE 4: ISRC ORGANIZATIONAL CHART<br />The ISAACRC is chaired by alumnae Dr. Marguerite Foxon (see Figure 5). She reports to faculty member Dr. Bob Reiser on all activities of the ISAACRC. The ISAACRC is comprised of subcommittees who perform an array of recruiting activities, such as on-campus recruiting. The names of the subcommittees were not disclosed. Through research of the ISRC’s wiki, two other alumni involved with the ISAACRC were identified as Darren Brooks and Eric Sikorski. Dr. Foxon was unavailable to provide any information on the subcommittees or other committee members.<br />FIGURE 5: ISAACRC ORGANIZATIONAL CHART<br />Faculty members are involved with recruiting students and it appears that some new methods are being used to reach out to distance students (see Table 1).<br />TABLE 1: WHAT METHODS ARE USED TO REACH OUT TO STUDENTS?<br />ResponseSourceThe faculty responded with ways they reach out to students.Visit FSU classesSet up meetings with current studentsEmails to interested candidatesPlans to Skype with interested candidatesWebsiteOn-Campus recruiting eventsQuality of the coursesFaculty Survey and Interview with Mary Kate McKee<br />Information Gathered to Facilitate Recruiting Efforts<br />Mary Kate McKee provides information about students who have either formally applied to the program or requested information through university admissions. This information is the only internal source of information about prospective students used by the ISRC and the ISAACRC (see Table 2).<br />TABLE 2: WHAT ARE THE INTERNAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION THE RECRUITING COMMITTEE RECEIVES?<br />ResponseSourceISRC members cited the information from interested students that Mary Kate McKee passes on to the committee as the only internal source of data.ISAACRC members provided similar answers:Mary Kate McKee and faculty/students assist in gathering information or gaining access to resourcesNotification of when students have been accepted to the programRecord of students who have decided not to enrollRecruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />The ISAACRC has several sources of external information, including email lists, alumni, and other professionals (see Table 3).<br />TABLE 3: WHAT ARE EXTERNAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION USED BY THE RECRUITING COMMITTEE?<br />ResponseSourceExternal sources of information the committee receives includes:Email listsInternet for information about other programs and general recruitment dataOther alumni or professionalsRecruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />The only form of communication a potential student receives is email. If the student declines to enroll, they are asked to fill out a survey. It is unclear what kind of approach is being used or the feedback being sought by the committee (see Table 4).<br />TABLE 4: WHAT IS DONE WITH INFORMATION GATHERED?<br />ResponseSourceISRC contacts individuals by emailISAACRC sends welcome email to newly accepted studentsWe created a student survey for students that decided not to enroll asking them why (result seemed to be money)Depends on the task/goal. Using feedback from students and external data sources helps use better define our approach.Recruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />Current Recruiting Goals<br />Currently there is not a specified goal for the two committees. However, we have recommended (see Business Analysis Report) that an appropriate business goal for the ISRC and ISAACRC is to achieve a 10% increase in number of students actively enrolled in courses each year in both the Master’s and PhD programs.<br />According to the data collected, there appears to be no formal goals for executing recruiting for either the ISRC or the ISAARC (see Table 5). If there are formalized recruiting goals, they have not been communicated to all interested parties in a clear manner. The two groups have their own goals and processes, but neither group has an overall process that drives the recruiting process. There are no evident formal processes in place to measure the success of recruiting efforts (see Table 6). Committee members provided different answers to this question, signaling the need for the groups to decide upon measurable objectives for their recruiting progress.<br />TABLE 5: CURRENT RECRUITING GOALS AS DESCRIBED BY ISRC, ISAACRC, AND FACULTY<br />ResponseSourceIncrease face to face student enrollment, ensure full classes of 15 – 25 studentsIncrease the amount of domestic PhD studentsIncrease the amount of online studentsIncrease enrollments by 5% per yearMake IS program more well-knownMaintain and raise standards, particularly with regard to the MS programAt least one respondent appeared to have thought the question was about recruiting faculty, and indicated the goal would be to recruit someone who is a strong “traditional” systems person.Faculty SurveyThe ISRC’s goal is to increase enrollment, though the specificity of this goal varies based on who is asked.The ISAACRC members listed goals such as:Increased student enrollment in the IS ProgramGetting students to enroll in FSU IS once they are acceptedDetermining student needs/values in a graduate program and specifically in an IS ProgramMaking sure marketing tools are effective and currentAttracting high quality students to the master’s and PhD programsEngaging alumni in helping transition new students into the program and act as a sounding board for applicantsRaising awareness about the program to organizations and institutions that may reach potential students of the programPromote the engagement of IS alumni in building a strong partnership with the Department which ultimately improves the Department’s ability to recruit high quality studentsRecruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />TABLE 6: HOW DO YOU MEASURE PROGRESS TOWARD YOUR GOAL?<br />ResponseSourceThere are no established measures other than student enrollment numbers (PhD, Masters FTF and online). Bob Reiser presents these numbers to the alumni advisory council (including recruitment committee) every year.They are not measured, Tristan Johnson and Christie Suggs cannot attribute increases or decreases to their efforts because economy now could play a role, would have to explore using a survey once students are admitted Recruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />The analysis indicates individuals involved with the recruiting process have a wide range of opinions about who is responsible for this process (see Table 7). Our analysis indicates that currently recruiting is only done occasionally on campus, and these events are organized by the ISRC. All other contact identified during the team’s data collection phase is initiated by Mary Kate McKee after students apply to or request information about the program. If other contact occurs, it was not evident from the data reviewed by the team.<br />TABLE 7: WHO IS HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR REACHING THESE GOALS AND IN WHAT WAY DO THEY CONTRIBUTE TO REACHING THEM?<br />ResponseSourceChristie and Tristan, by emailing, advertising and holding eventsMy perception is that Dean Driscoll would be held accountable to the university, and Vanessa Dennen (IS program leader) and the faculty to Dean Driscoll. Faculty participates in recruiting and communicating with accepted students. Formed recruiting committee.The chair of each alumni council committee is held accountable for monitoring the progress of each subcommittee/team. The committees work with faculty and students to ensure objectives are obtained.Recruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />ISRC and ISAACRC Interactions<br />While it seems that the committees work together in some capacity, direct comments from the committee members make it clear that there is no formal process to leverage the activities of each group to recruit new students to the IS program (see Table 8).<br /> <br />TABLE 8: HOW DO THE ISRC AND THE ISAACRC INTERACT TO RECRUIT STUDENTS?<br />ResponseSourceChristie is the liasion, who funnels everything through Mary Kate McKee.Never have been too sure on this. There is some overlap, like Marguerite and me (Eric) asked to participate in on campus recruiting organized by graduate program committee. I think Marguerite is kept in the loop for the grad committee and keeps them in the loop of our activities but have to ask her.Each committee has a chair that is responsible for tracking the progress of each subcommittee and reports back to the alumni council.Recruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />Use of Information Gathered by the Recruiting Committees<br />The ISRC has created a variety of promotional items to assist them with on-campus recruiting. The ISAACRC has used the information from surveys to map the process from application to enrollment. They also have plans to produce a recruiting video (see Table 9).<br />TABLE 9: WHAT ARE THE OUTPUTS OF THE RECRUITING COMMITTEE IN TERMS OF INFORMATION AND PRODUCTS?<br />ResponseSourceThe ISRC has created promotional items (banners, bookmarks, advertisements), correspondence, distributed flyers on campus.The ISAACRC has mapped the student application, acceptance, enrollment process. A recruiting video is in the works. However, they essentially are still in the data collection and idea stage.Recruiting Committee Surveys and interviews<br />Optimal Recruiting Practices<br />An ideal recruiting program would identify target populations of desirable potential students, and focus activities to attract their attention to the FSU Instructional Systems program. The team asked the faculty and alumni for their opinions on how an ideal recruiting process would be structured.<br />How can the recruiting committees increase awareness of the program to prospective students in the United States and abroad? The faculty believes increasing awareness of the program is required to attract new students. They also mentioned program attributes required to attract students. These include:<br /><ul><li>Funding for students
  77. 77. High profile instructor
  78. 78. More face-to-face courses </li></ul>The alumni also saw the need to promote the IS program to potential students. They recommended increasing the awareness of the program to the following undergraduate programs:<br /><ul><li>Performance Management
  79. 79. The Social Sciences
  80. 80. College of Business</li></ul>The alumni also offered many concrete suggestions for promoting the program (see Table 10):<br /><ul><li>Multi-lingual informational seminars
  81. 81. Using an alumni network
  82. 82. Finding employers who need to bolster the skills of their education and HR departments
  83. 83. Using conferences and professional organizations</li></ul>Marketing to domestic and international students is a priority. Currently the only marketing is done beyond the campus of FSU is the internet material, promotion at conferences, and faculty talking with folks in their normal line of work (e.g. out of town meetings). Prospective students searching for information about the program will most likely first look at the website. The lack of up-to-date information on the website was mentioned by several sources as a problem. In addition to an engaging website, using social media sites such as YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter could expand the marketing footprint. Another marketing target could be corporations and institutions with education departments with employees that do not hold degrees in the fields of Instructional Design or HPT.<br />TABLE 10: WHAT STEPS WOULD AN IDEAL RECRUITING PROCESS INCLUDE?<br />ResponseSourceProviding funding for admitted studentsAttracting high profile instructors Offering more face-to-face coursesCreating awareness of the program for potential MS students.Faculty SurveyPartnering with other top IS programs to broadly advertise about the IS fieldLink to each program because many undergrads don’t know about the opportunities in the field of ISWeb-Seminars in Spanish for prospective students and young professionalsUse the caliber of international graduates to promote the programContinue to recruit from FSU undergrad professional tracks (e.g. performance Management, the social sciences, and College of Business)Use the Alumni NetworkSeek out employers and offer them online courses to bolster current employees (ID’s without degrees) an opportunity to take FSU IS classesAdvertising the top tier reputation through conferences, websites, publications and organizationsMarket through ISPI ASTD, a decent website and a YouTube videoMarket the field to business and government entities to cultivate employment opportunitiesStress job placement, the ranking of the programOffer programs in the areas of technology enabled learningLink with Latin American universities (ex: ITESM, ITAM from Mexico)Advertise more to main stream venues (ex: Google, AOL)Add additional classes that focus on Flash, new authoring systems, assessments, evaluation, provide a more business focusHelp with job placement after graduation- publicizing this would encourage more people to come to this fieldAlumni Survey<br />The faculty was also queried about their opinions of the most important recruiting activities (see Table 11) and the least important recruiting activities (see Table 12) to get an idea for what they feel is working in the current recruiting process. The team considered these responses when outlining optimal recruiting processes.<br />When the faculty was asked to list the most important recruiting activities, monetary support was mentioned as an important way to attract students. They also felt that maintaining a high profile faculty will strengthen the program’s academic reputation. Finally, faculty believes increasing awareness of the program is critical as many people do not understand the purpose of the major (Instructional Systems).<br />The faculty does not think that passive advertising is an effective form of recruiting. While the local social campaigns might attract FSU undergraduate students, more should be done to reach potential applicants outside the realm of Florida State University.<br />TABLE 11: MOST IMPORTANT RECRUITING ACTIVITY<br />ResponseSourceProviding funding for students we admitOne respondent indentified the funding should support PhD studentsDevelop and establish high profile faculty, recruiting from other institutions if necessaryBuild awareness of the program for Master’s candidatesCreate word-of-mouth buzz by offering more face to face courses, enhancing course quality, have faculty spend more time teaching, and raising the grading criteriaFaculty Survey<br />TABLE 12: LEAST IMPORTANT RECRUITING ACTIVITY<br />ResponseSourceRaising more grants to provide more student scholarships and assistantshipsLocal social campaignsAdvertisements- because they are rather passiveFaculty Survey<br />Competitiveness of FSU’s IS Program Compared to IS Programs of Other Universities<br />The faculty was surveyed with regards to the competitiveness of FSU’s IS program in relation to IS programs at other universities. The faculty thinks that the program is in the top 5 schools for Instructional Systems and views the program as a contender among academically strong universities (see Table 13). Although the faculty believes the program is strong, they realize that it does not hold the top spot in the field (see Table 14 and Figure 6).<br />TABLE 13: WHICH UNIVERSITIES COMPETE WITH FSU'S IS PROGRAM?<br />ResponseSourceIndiana UniversityPenn StateArizona StateUniversity of GeorgiaOne response also suggested that universities local to students also compete for IS Master’s candidates.Faculty Survey<br />TABLE 14: HOW COMPETITIVE IS THE FSU IS PROGRAM?<br />ResponseSourceThe majority of the faculty surveyed feel that FSU’s IS program is moderately competitive.Faculty Survey<br />FIGURE 6: FSU IS PROGRAM COMPETITIVENESS<br />The intent was to take the list of the universities that are considered to be competition, and analyze their recruiting practices. Unfortunately, there was not time to perform a full competitive analysis.<br />Performance Measures<br />After reviewing the data collected relative to current recruiting practices of the ISRC, ISAACRC, and IS program faculty, the team did not uncover specific measures used to track progress made toward the non-formalized goal of increasing IS program student enrollment. Although it would be preferable to continue data collection and interviews to gain consensus on a business goal, time constraints prevent that from being possible. In lieu of those actions, the team recommends the following performance measures:<br /><ul><li>Number of students actively enrolled each academic year
  84. 84. IS Program representation at carefully selected recruiting events (both on- and off-campus) throughout the academic year
  85. 85. Contact of prospective students at various points in the admission process by specific ISRC, ISAACRC, IS program faculty member, and IS students</li></ul>Number of Students Actively Enrolled Each Academic Year<br />The most commonly-cited goal stated in surveys and interviews was to increase IS program student enrollment at both the Master’s and Ph.D. levels. Actively enrolled students would include those students enrolled in the IS program who are also enrolled in classes. This is a direct way to measure performance relative to the proposed business goal.<br />IS Program Representation at Recruiting Events<br />While gathering data regarding current recruiting practices, the team learned that planned recruiting activities take place on-campus at various points during the year. Fall and spring recruiting events target identification of students interested in Instructional Systems, as do occasional visits to Psychology classes made by Dr. Robert Reiser. When possible, faculty presenting papers at industry conferences talk to individuals about the IS program in order to spark additional interest. The team recommends that these practices be standardized and additional efforts be made in the areas of corporate recruiting and recruiting via industry journals and social media. Table 15 summarizes current and ideal practices of recruiting activities.<br />TABLE 15: SUMMARY OF CURRENT AND IDEAL RECRUITING ACTIVITIES<br />Recruiting ActivityCurrent PracticeIdeal PracticeCampus RecruitingOccasional faculty visits to psychology classes Fall and Spring Recruiting Event (week prior to class registration)Career Center's Grad Quest (annual event)FlyersISSA, Alumni, ISRC, Faculty, current students visit 20 classes of different majors annually and hand out flyersFall and Spring Recruiting Event: gather 25 student names each eventCareer Center's Grad Quest: target 25 student namesConferencesFaculty perform recruiting functions on an ad-hoc basisPlan to attend 4 annual conferencesCreate a flyer or packet for faculty to distribute at conferences Whenever a paper is presented, recruiting materials should be presented as wellEncourage and equip students to attend conferences to advertise the programCorporate RecruitingCurrently employees of corporations with large education or HR departments are not targeted for recruitingPrepare packet of information targeted at Corporations about the IS programOffer the packet for download on the websitePrepare list of companies from following sources to target:T&D top 30Top 125Companies employing current students and alumniCompanies that recruit from the programPrepare a presentation about the programTarget 5 companies from the list to visit and present to each yearJournalIt is not clear from the data collected if any Journal advertising is currently being performedPlace ads in Training Industry Journals:T&D (ASTD)CLOISPIJournal of Engineering Research & Development Journal<br />Recruiting ActivityCurrent PracticeIdeal PracticeWebsite The following static information is posted on the website:Information about MS and PhD programsInformation about MS and PhD AdmissionsAlumni informationCurrent Student ResourcesFaculty/Staff informationInformation posted on the website should also contain current events, to reflect the vibrancy of the program. It should include:Static Info (updated as program changes):Information about MS and PhD programsInformation about MS and PhD AdmissionsAlumni informationCurrent Student ResourcesFaculty/Staff informationDynamic info (updated as events happen):Current recruiting scheduleSocial Media contact informationInformation about current researchInformation explaining the purpose and history of the programInformation on conference presentations and attendance<br />Recruiting ActivityCurrent PracticeIdeal PracticeSocial MediaFrom the information gathered, it does not appear that social media is being used for recruiting purposes at the present time.The following social media tools should be used to enhance the recruiting effort:Twitter accountAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to all changes on the websiteRefer interested students to existing inquiry processContact point for interested studentsJoin education community on Twitter, find new prospects, build awareness of programFacebook GroupAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to all changes on the websiteContact point for interested studentsLinkedIn GroupAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to published researchRefer interested students to existing inquiry processContact point for interested students and alumniParticipation in Alumni Ning GroupAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to published researchRefer interested students to existing inquiry processContact point for interested students and alumni<br />Contact of Prospective Students<br />In order to optimize the number of students accepted into the IS program who continue on to enroll in and complete courses, the team examine current student contact practices. Contact currently occurs at three points in the process – prior to the prospective student submitting an application, upon submission of an application, and once a decision is reached whether or not to admit the prospective student. Table 16 summarizes current and ideal practices of prospective student contact.<br />Current contacts:<br />Pre-application (AY or website) - Mary Kate and ISRC (Christie)<br />Application - Faculty, ISSA, and Alumni<br />TABLE 16: SUMMARY OF CURRENT AND IDEAL PROSPECTIVE STUDENT CONTACT<br />Recruiting ActivityCurrent PracticeIdeal PracticeProspective Student Contact Pre-application (AY or website):Mary Kate* Recruiting CoordinatorApplication:FacultyISSAAlumniAcceptance:Email from Dr. Becker (chair of the department) *may have additional contact with MK based on questions, incomplete applications, etcInterest/Pre-application:Mary KateRecruiting CoordinatorAlumniApplicationFaculty (acknowledges application, provide contact information for questions)Acceptance:Email from Dept ChairISSAAdvisor<br />Gap Analysis<br />Purpose<br />The purpose of the gap analysis is to identify the disparity between the current state of performance of the teams responsible for recruiting new students to the FSU IS program and the desired state of performance. In other words, the gap analysis will identify if there is a difference between current and optimal performance. Optimal performance will enable the teams to meet their business goal of increasing student enrollment by ten percent.<br />Analysis Questions<br />The following questions guided the gap analysis process:<br /><ul><li>What is the current performance level of the ISRC and ISAACRC relative to the stated performance goals?
  86. 86. To what extent is the current performance level not meeting the goals of the ISRC and ISAACRC?
  87. 87. What is the impact of not meeting the desired level of performance?
  88. 88. How costly will it be to resolve the gap?</li></ul>The main goal of the gap analysis was to determine if a difference exists between the current performance and the optimal performance required to achieve the business goal. <br />Approach<br />The performance analysis phase produced two broad performance goals for the ISRC and ISAACRC teams. These goals are related to IS representation at various recruiting activities and how often and by whom prospective students are contacted once they have expressed interest in the IS program.<br />Each broad goal was broken into performance components. These components were derived from the surveys, interviews, and research conducted during the business analysis phase. The performance components were divided again into the subcomponents it would take to perform the main performance component. Each subcomponent was assigned a measureable goal. Finally, data derived from the Performance Analysis stage was used to determine how the committees’ performance with regards to recruiting matched up to the performance components.<br />Data Collection and Analysis Results<br />IS Program Recruiting<br />The current recruiting committee had the task of restarting the recruiting efforts, given the lapse of two years of no deliberate recruiting effort. Processes have been established and the committee is working with limited resources. At this time, there are little or no performance measures that the committee can use as benchmarks for success in recruiting. Through the performance and gap analysis, the analysis team has developed an ideal scenario for both recruiting and contact of prospective students. From the current and ideal scenarios, the team determined the gap of the recruiting procedures. This information is explained in the following tables.<br />Performance Measures<br />Table 17 outlines the recruiting component, subcomponents, and measurements, providing benchmarks for success in recruiting.<br />TABLE 17: RECRUITING COMPONENTS, SUBCOMPONENTS, AND OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE<br />Recruiting ComponentSubcomponentOptimal Performance1. Campus Recruiting1.1. Organize visits by ISSA, Alumni, ISRC, Faculty, and current students to different majors annually and distribute flyers20 classes of different majors per year are visited1.2. Participate in Fall and Spring Recruiting EventsGather 25 student names each event1.3. Participate in Career Center's Grad QuestGather 25 student names2. Conferences2. 1. Attend 4 annual conferences4 conferences attended2.2. Create a flyer or packet for faculty to distribute at conferences Flyer/packet designed, created, and available to conference representatives2.3. Present recruiting materials whenever a paper is presented by students or facultyCreate and maintain a wiki that is available to anyone who attends a conference to capture the results of informal recruiting2.4. Encourage and equip students to attend conferences to advertise the programCreate and maintain a list or wiki on the website for all upcoming conferencesProvide mentoring for students interested in presentingProvide mentoring in how to advertise the program3. Corporate Recruiting3.1. Prepare packet of information about the IS program targeted at corporations3.2 Offer the packet for download on the website3.3 Prepare list of companies from following sources to target:T&D top 30 (ASTD publication)Training (magazine) Top 125Companies employing current students and alumniCompanies that recruit from the program3.4 Prepare a presentation about the program3.5 Target companies from the list to visit and present to each year3.6 Contact companies visited in past years to provide program updates and maintain relationshipPrepare packet tailored to corporationsPost packet on websitePrepare target list and update twice a yearPrepare program presentationVisit five companies a year to deliver presentationMaintain relationships with companies visited in past years <br />Recruiting ComponentSubcomponentOptimal Performance4. JournalsPlace ads in Training industry Journals, such as:T&D (ASTD)CLOISPIJournal of Engineering Research & Development JournalTrainingPlace ads in at least 4 print journals annually5. Website Maintain Static Info (updated as program changes):Information about MS and Ph.D. programsInformation about MS and Ph.D. AdmissionsAlumni informationCurrent Student ResourcesFaculty/Staff informationIncrease visits to the website by 30%.Improve search engine optimization (SEO) so that the following Google searches result with the IS website in the top position:ISD graduate programsHPT graduate programsISD Ph.D. programsHPT Ph.D. programsDevelop Dynamic info (updated as events happen):Current recruiting scheduleSocial Media contact informationInformation about current researchInformation explaining the purpose and history of the programInformation on conference presentations and attendance5.2.1 Recruiting schedule posted must not be older than 1 semester5.2.2 Social Media contact information should include:Facebook pageTwitter accountLinkedIn groupYouTube Channel5.2.3 Current research posted must not be older than 1 semester5.2.4 Purpose and history of the program must contain 5 multi-media elements5.2.5 Conference Presentations and attendance information posted must not be older than 1 semester<br />Recruiting ComponentSubcomponentOptimal Performance6. Social MediaManage Twitter accountAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to all changes on the websiteRefer interested students to existing inquiry processContact point for interested studentsJoin education community on Twitter, find new prospects, build awareness of programTweet once a dayGain 300 followers per yearManage Facebook GroupAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to all changes on the websiteContact point for interested studentsUpdate two times per monthManage LinkedIn GroupAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to published researchRefer interested students to existing inquiry processContact point for interested students and alumniUpdate two times per monthParticipate in Alumni Ning GroupAdvertise upcoming recruiting deadlines and eventsAdvertise conference attendancePost links to published researchRefer interested students to existing inquiry processContact point for alumniUpdate two times per month<br />Analysis of Gaps Related to Current Enrollment Numbers and Recruiting Activities<br />Table 18 below describes the gap between the current enrollment numbers and ideal enrollment numbers in the IS Program. Based on average enrollment data from the school year 2008/2009, enrollment numbers should increase by ten percent, which would mean an additional 7 Master’s students and 4 Ph.D. students.<br />Table 19 below describes the gap between the current and ideal recruiting activities conducted by IS Program stakeholders. Campus recruiting is minimal, and recruiting beyond the campus is only conducted on an ad hoc basis. Journal advertising is not currently placed. The website is not regularly updated. Social media outreach is in its beginning stages with the program and only used by a few faculty members.<br />Performance Measure 1: Number of Students Actively Enrolled each Academic Year<br />TABLE 18: GAPS RELATED TO ENROLLMENTS<br />StepOptimal PerformanceGap 1.0Student Enrollment1.1Actively enrolled students (students enrolled in the IS program who are also enrolled in classes) will increase by 10% each year. Based on most recent data for 2008/2009, this will mean an increase of 7 Master’s students and 4 Ph.D. studentsThe target performance measure is to increase enrollments annually by 10%. From data collected in years 2004 through 2009, a desired 10% increase year over year shows a 30% gap of Master’s students (101 optimal versus 72 actual), and a 17% gap of Ph.D. students (54 optimal versus 45 actual).Note: It is unknown how many students leave the program annually. Were this information tracked, it could be useful in further refining the target.<br />Performance Measure 2: IS Program Representation at Recruiting Events<br />TABLE 19: GAPS RELATED TO THE CURRENT RECRUITING PROCESS<br />StepOptimal PerformanceCurrent PerformanceGap 1.0Campus Recruiting1.1SSA, Alumni, ISRC, Faculty, current students visit 20 classes of different majors annuallyFaculty visits psychology classes on an ad hoc basis The target performance measure is to visit 20 different classes of different majors annually. Currently classroom visits are not tracked, so the precise gap is unknown, however it is apparent that the groups are falling short on the number and diversity of classrooms visited.1.2Gather 25 student names each Fall/Spring Recruiting eventISRC participates in Fall and Spring recruiting eventsThe goal is to gather 25 prospective student names at the spring and fall events. Current numbers not monitored, though from observation at Spring Recruiting event the actual falls short of the target of 25 student names.1.3Target 25 student names at Grad QuestISRC participates in Grad QuestThe target is to gather 25 names at the Career Center’s Grad Quest event. Current performance is unknown because numbers not monitored, however it is apparent that the groups are falling short of the target.<br />StepOptimal PerformanceCurrent PerformanceGap 2.0Conferences2.14 conferences attendedCurrently, there are two to three conferences attended by Faculty and/or staff members per year.The target performance measure should be 4 attended conferences per year. Currently the faculty and staff attend 2 or 3 conferences a year, for an average of 2.5. The performance gap is 1.5 conferences a year.2.2Flyer/packet designed, created, and available to conference representativesVarious flyers exist and have been used at various recruiting eventsThe performance goal is to create a packet of materials for use at all recruiting opportunities. Currently there are flyers that exist for recruiting opportunities. The gap is a cohesive set of documents gathered into one recruiting packet.2.3Create and maintain a wiki that is available to anyone who attends a conference to capture the results of informal recruitingNo such wiki existsThe performance goal is the existence of a wiki that can be used to capture conference recruiting results. No such wiki exists, so the creation and maintenance of the wiki is the performance gap or 100%.2.4Create and maintain a wiki on the website for all upcoming conferencesNo such wiki existsThe performance goal is create a wiki of upcoming conferences on the website. Currently, no such wiki exists. The gap is a wiki that lists upcoming conferences or 100%.2.5Provide mentoring for students interested in presenting at conferencesThere is no process for students to learn about submitting to and presenting at conferences. The performance goal is to provide mentoring to students interesting in presented in presenting at conferences. Since this mentoring process does not currently exist, the gap is the mentoring process or 100%.2.6Provide mentoring in how to advertise the program at conferencesThere is no sharing of information on how to advertise the IS program at conferencesThe performance goal is to provide mentoring for advertising the conference at conferences. Since this mentoring does not take place now, the gap is the mentorship process or 100%.3.0Corporate Recruiting3.1Prepare an information packet about the IS program that is tailored to corporationsCurrently there is not an IS program information packet tailored to corporationsThe performance goal is to prepare an information packet about the IS program that is tailored to corporations. This packet does not exist currently. The gap is the information packet or 100%.<br />StepOptimal PerformanceCurrent PerformanceGap 3.0Corporate Recruiting (cont.)3.2Post information packet on the IS websiteCurrently, the information packet does not exist and is not posted on the website.The performance goal is to post the information packet on the IS website. Currently there is no packet posted so it does not exist. The gap for this performance goal is posting an information packet on the IS website or 100%. 3.3Prepare target list of corporations with Training and HR departments that may have employees who would benefit from the IS program, and update that list twice a yearCurrently a list of corporations that may have employees who would benefit from the IS program does not exist.The performance goal is to prepare a list of corporations that may have employees who would benefit from the IS program, and to update the list bi-annually. Currently the list does not exist. The gap is the creation and maintenance of this list or 100%.3.4Create an IS program presentation tailored to corporationsCurrently a program tailored to the needs of corporations does not exist.The performance goal is to create an IS program presentation that is tailored to the needs of corporations. Currently, such a presentation does not exist. The gap is the creation of this presentation, or 100%.3.5Visit five companies a year to deliver presentationCurrently the IS program does not visit companies for recruiting purposesThe performance goal is to visit 5 companies to deliver the presentation. Currently, no companies are visited, so the performance gap is 5.3.6Maintain relationships with companies visited in past yearsCurrently the IS program does not have recruiting relationships with any companiesThe performance goal is to maintain relationships with companies that have been visited in previous years. Currently the IS program does not have this sort of relationship with companies, so the gap is maintaining any relationships that will be developed.4.0Print Journals4.1Place ads in at least 4 print journals annuallyThe IS program does not presently advertise in journalsThe performance goal is to place ads in at least 4 print journals. Currently the IS program does not advertise in print journals, so the gap is 4.5.0IS Website5.1Increase visits to the website by 30%Data was not collected on current website statisticsThe performance goal is to increase website visits by 30%. There is no current data on website traffic, therefore the gap cannot be determined.<br />StepOptimal PerformanceCurrent PerformanceGap 5.0IS Website (cont.)5.2Improve search engine optimization (SEO) so that the following Google searches result with the IS website in the top position:ISD graduate programsHPT graduate programsISD Ph.D. programsHPT Ph.D. programsCurrently, the IS website is not returned as the top result for any of the required Google searchesThe performance goal is to improve SEO so that the IS website first upon searching Google for ISD graduate programs, HPT graduate programs, ISD Ph.D. programs, and HPT Ph.D. programs. Currently the ISD program is not returned in the number one spot for any of those searches, so the gap is 100%.5.3Recruiting schedule posted on the IS website must not be older than 1 semesterNo recruiting schedule is postedThe performance goal is to ensure the recruiting schedule on the IS website is not older than 1 semester. Currently, no recruiting schedule is posted on the IS website, so the gap is 100% 5.4Social media contact information should be posted on the IS website. This should include:Facebook IS group Twitter accountLinkedIn groupYouTube ChannelCurrently social media information for the IS Alumni Ning site, an Alumni IS Facebook group, and an IS LinkedIn group are posted.The performance goal is to post social media contact information (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube) for IS recruiting on the IS Website. Currently there are Facebook and LinkedIn groups posted, however the official IS Facebook page is not posted. The gap is 75% as YouTube and Twitter contact information is not posted, and the official IS Facebook page is not posted.5.5Current research posted on the IS website must not be older than 1 semesterNo current research is posted on the IS websiteThe performance goal is to ensure research posted on the IS website is not older than 1 semester. Currently there is no information about current research processes, so the gap is 100%.5.6Purpose and history of the program posted on the IS website must contain 5 multi-media elementsNeither the purpose nor the history of program contains multimedia elementsThe performance goal is to use 5 multi-media elements to describe the purpose and history of the program. Currently neither the purpose nor history of the program is described using multimedia elements, so the gap is 100%.5.7Conference Presentations and attendance information posted on the IS website must not be older than 1 semesterConference presentations and attendance information are not currently postedThe performance goal is to ensure the information about conference presentations and attendance is not older than 1 semester. Currently this information is not posted on the IS website, so the gap is 100%.<br />StepOptimal PerformanceCurrent PerformanceGap 6.0Social Media6.1Twitter: Tweet once a day, and gain 300 followers per yearAlthough a few faculty members are using social media, Twitter is not being used strategically as a recruiting toolThe performance goal is to tweet once a day, and build a network of 300 followers in the first year. Currently, twitter is not being used strategically as a recruiting tool, so the gap is 365 tweets and 300 followers6.2Update Facebook two times per monthAn IS group exists on Facebook, but it is not regularly updated by ISRC members. It was created in July 2009, and had 3 posts in July, 21 posts in August, and 1 post in Sept. The performance goal is to update the Facebook group twice a month. Since it was created, the IS Facebook has been updated an average of 5 times per month. However a disproportionate amount of those updates occurred in one month. For the past 2 months, there have been no updates resulting in a 100% gap in performance. One month missed the goal by 50%6.3Update the IS LinkedIn group two times per monthA LinkedIn group exists for the IS alumni community, but not for the IS program. The alumni group is not updated regularly by the ISRCThe performance goal is to update an IS Program LinkedIn group twice a month. There is not a IS Program LinkedIn group, so the gap is 100%.6.4Create discussions in the Alumni Ning community two times per monthThe IS Program Alumni Ning exists, but it is not updated regularly. In the past year, 1 discussion was added in February, 3 in March, 1 in April, 1 in May, none in June, 3 in July, 1 in August, none in September, one in October and 1 in November.The performance goal is to update the Alumni Ning Community twice a month. Since February of this year, there were on average .83 discussions started a month. This misses the goal by 1.17 discussions.<br />Performance Measure 3: Contact of Prospective Students during the Admission Process <br />Table 20 below outlines the recruiting component, subcomponents, and measurements to streamline the contact process:<br />TABLE 20: RECRUITING COMPONENTS, SUBCOMPONENTS AND OPTIMAL PERFORMANCE RELATED TO COMMUNICATION WITH PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS<br />Recruiting ComponentSubcomponent Optimal Performance7.0. Prospective Student Contact Interest/Pre-application:Mary KateRecruiting Coordinator*may have additional contact with MK based on questions, incomplete applications, etc7.1 Interest/Pre-application:7.1.1 Email from Mary Kate7.1.2 Email from Recruiting Coordinator (Christie Suggs)7.1.3 Email from AlumniApplication provide contact information for questionsFaculty (acknowledges applicationISSAAlumni7.2 Application provide contact information for questions7.2.1 Email from Faculty (acknowledges application)AcceptanceEmail from Department ChairMary Kate7.3 Acceptance7.3.1 Email from Department Chair7.3.2 Email from ISSA7.3.3 Email from Advisor<br />Analysis of Gaps Related to Communications with Prospective Students<br />The team found that although there are several communications taking place with individuals interested in or applying for admission, the schedule of those contacts needs to be adjusted to provide the most value to the prospective student. It is helpful for the individual to receive information from different perspectives (alumni, current student, ISRC faculty member) but the focus of contact during the application process should be with a faculty member. Once the individual has been accepted, contact from ISSA and alumni would be more appropriate and helpful as they make their plans to enroll in the program. Table 21 below describes the gap between the current communication process and the ideal communication process.<br />TABLE 21: GAPS RELATED TO COMMUNICATION WITH PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS<br /><ul><li>StepOptimal PerformanceCurrent PerformanceGap 7.0Student contact7.1 Interest/Pre-applicationCurrently, individuals who express interest in the program are contacted several times by different people:Emails from Mary Kate, emails from faculty, emails from ISSA, emails from alumniThe performance goal is to have Mary Kate, the RC, and an alumni representative contact the prospective student. Current performance is that in addition to these three contact points, ISSA and faculty contact the students. The performance goal is being missed by the 2 extra contact pointsStepOptimal PerformanceCurrent PerformanceGap 7.0Student contact (cont.)7.1.1 Email from Mary KateMary Kate currently sends emailMary Kate meets the performance goal 100%7.1.2 Email from Recruiting Coordinator (RC – Currently Christie Suggs)The RC currently sends emailThe RC meets the performance goal 100%7.1.3 Email from AlumniAlumni sends emailThe Alumni meet the performance goal 100%7.2Application provide contact information for questionsCurrently, the individual is contacted by a faculty member, an ISSA officer and an alumnus. The performance goal is to restrict contact at the time of application to a Faculty member. Currently, an individual making an application is contacted by a faculty member, an ISSA officer, and an alumnus. The goal is being missed by 2 extra contact points.7.2.1Faculty (acknowledges application)Faculty sends emailFaculty meet the performance goal by 100%7.3Contact once acceptedCurrently, the only contact a student has once they have been accepted is an email from the Department Chair and Mary Kate.The performance goal is to contact students upon acceptance by department chair, ISSA, and the student’s advisor. Currently only the Department Chair and Mary Kate contact the student once they have been accepted. The gap is contact by ISSA and the student’s advisor.7.3.1Email from Department ChairDepartment Chair sends emailDepartment chair meets the performance goal by 100%7.3.2Email from ISSAISSA does not send emailISSA misses the performance goal by 100%7.3.3Email from AdvisorAdvisor does not send emailAdvisor misses the performance goal by 100%</li></ul>Cause Analysis<br />Purpose<br />The purpose of the cause analysis is to identify the reasons that the recruiting committees are not successfully recruiting new students to the FSU IS program. In other words, the cause analysis will identify what is keeping these organizations from meeting their business goal of increasing student enrollment by ten percent each year.<br />Analysis Questions<br />The following questions guided the gap analysis process:<br /><ul><li>Why isn’t the performance goal of 10% increase in student enrollment annually being achieved?
  89. 89. Why aren’t the performance measures of campus recruiting, attending conferences, corporate recruiting, recruiting in print journals, and using the IS website and social media being met?
  90. 90. What is causing the gap in performance in the performance measures that support the process to contact prospective students during the recruiting process?</li></ul>The main goal of the cause analysis was to determine why the organizations are not achieving their business goal of increasing active student enrollments by ten percent annually. <br />Approach<br />In the Performance Analysis, the team previously identified three performance measures:<br /><ul><li>Number of students actively enrolled each academic year
  91. 91. IS Program representation at carefully selected recruiting events (both on- and off-campus) throughout the academic year
  92. 92. Contact of prospective students at various points in the admission process by specific ISRC, ISAACRC, and IS program faculty members, and IS students</li></ul>The performance measures were analyzed to determine the optimal performances. From there, the team identified the gaps in performance. Analysis conducted in this report determined why these gaps exist.<br />Analysis Results<br />Performance Measure 1: Number of Students Actively Enrolled each Academic Year<br />Although a formal recruiting committee existed in the past, there was a two-year gap during which there was no recruiting conducted at all, in the years 2007 and 2008. It can be extrapolated from the enrollment data from a five-year period that enrollments should be higher than they are now. The drop in enrollment may be due to the time gap in recruiting. Figure 7 represents average semester enrollment data from academic years 2004-2005 through academic years 2008-2009. Table 22 describes the cause for lack of enrollment increases.<br />FIGURE 7: AVERAGE SEMESTER ENROLLMENT NUMBERS<br />TABLE 22: NUMBER OF STUDENTS ACTIVELY ENROLLED EACH ACADEMIC YEAR<br />StepOptimal PerformanceGap Cause1.0Student Enrollment1.1Actively enrolled students (students enrolled in the IS program who are also enrolled in classes) will increase by 10% overall each year. Based on most recent data for 2008/2009, this will mean an increase of 7 Masters students and 4 Ph.D. students.The target performance measure is to increase enrollments annually by 10% overall. From data collected in years 2004 through 2009, a desired 10% overall increase year over year shows a 30% gap of Masters students (101 optimal versus 72 actual), and a 17% gap of Ph.D. students (54 optimal versus 45 actual).The cause of the drop in enrollment could be attributed to the lack of recruiting process. Due to time limitations, this cause could not be identified more clearly.<br />Performance Measure 2: IS Program Representation at Recruiting Events<br />Recruiting on campus is not at optimal performance. Gaps were identified relating to on-campus recruiting to provide target performance measures for visiting classes and gathering prospective student names at the Fall and Spring recruiting events, as well as at GradQuest. The recruiting gaps exist due to lack of funding and formal processes. It is not possible to evaluate benchmarks because of the lack of measurable goals set by the committees.<br />Conference attendance for recruiting purposes is not at optimal performance. Gaps were identified regarding number of conferences that should be attended, and the lack of materials to supply to conference attendees for marketing. Another identified gap is the lack of a wiki for use as a repository of information about recruiting and what conferences should be attended. Mentoring students to present at conferences was also identified as a gap. The cause for gaps in attending and marketing at conferences is due to lack of funds, prior commitments for faculty and lack of established processes.<br />There is no formal process for reaching out to the corporate field, so that area has not been tapped for recruiting. Information should be gathered about corporations and a packet of information should be assembled with targeted information about specific corporations, available to disseminate in person and through a maintained wiki. Once this information is assembled, IS Program stakeholders should make visits to corporations to identify their education needs. Once contacts have been established, maintaining those relationships are critical.<br />In the past, print advertising was used to promote the IS Program. In recent years, however, lack of funds prevent the IS Program from advertising in trade journals.<br />Several areas were identified to improve the IS Program website. These areas included strategies to increase search results on the Internet, including information about the program’s purpose and history, as well as current research. Information about conference presentations and recruiting schedules were also identified. In addition, social media contact information was identified. However, the website remains outdated due to lack of delegation for updating information and expanding information on other areas of the website. Social media outlets, such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Ning, have not been utilized due to lack of delegation as well. Table 23 describes the causes for gaps in IS Program representation.<br />TABLE 23: IS PROGRAM REPRESENTATION AT RECRUITING EVENTS<br />StepOptimal PerformanceGap Cause1.0Campus Recruiting1.1SSA, Alumni, ISRC, Faculty, current students visit 20 classes of different majors annually.The target performance measure is to visit 20 different classes of different majors annually. Currently classroom visits are not tracked, so the precise gap is unknown, however it is apparent that the groups are falling short on the number and diversity of classrooms visited.There is no formal process or measurable goal for the committees to achieve.1.2Gather 25 student names each Fall/Spring Recruiting event.25 student names.There is no formal process or measurable goal for the committees to achieve.1.3Target 25 student names at Grad Quest.The target is to gather 25 names at the Career Center’s Grad Quest event. Current performance is unknown because numbers are not monitored; however it is apparent that the groups are falling short of the target.There is no formal process or measurable goal for the committees to achieve.2.0Conferences2.1Attend 4 conferences.1.5 conferences a year.Faculty members are not given materials or direction for recruiting.Funds are limited for conference attendance.2.2Flyer/packet designed, created, and available to conference representatives.The gap is a cohesive set of documents gathered into one recruiting packet.Faculty members have higher priorities than recruiting and have time constraints.<br />StepOptimal PerformanceGap Cause2.0Conferences (cont.)2.3Create and maintain a wiki that is available to anyone who attends a conference to capture the results of informal recruiting.No such wiki exists, so the creation and maintenance of the wiki is the performance gap, or 100%.Faculty members have higher priorities than recruiting and have time constraints.2.4Create and maintain a wiki on the website for all upcoming conferences.Currently, no such wiki exists. The gap is a wiki that lists upcoming conferences, or 100%.Faculty members have higher priorities than recruiting and have time constraints.2.5Provide mentoring for students interested in presenting at conferences.The mentoring process, or 100%.There is no formal process or measurable goal for the committees to achieve.2.6Provide mentoring in how to advertise the program at conferences.The mentorship process, or 100%.There is no formal process or measurable goal for the committees to achieve.3.0Corporate Recruiting3.1Prepare an information packet about the IS program that is tailored to corporations.The information packet, or 100%.There is no formal process for reaching out to corporate organizations.3.2Post information packet on the IS website.Posting an information packet on the IS website, or 100%. There is no formal process for reaching out to corporate organizations.3.3Prepare target list of corporations with Training and HR departments that may have employees who would benefit from the IS program, and update that list twice a year.The creation and maintenance of this list, or 100%.There is no formal process for reaching out to corporate organizations.3.4Create an IS program presentation tailored to corporations.The creation of this presentation, or 100%.There is no formal process for reaching out to corporate organizations.3.5Visit five companies a year to deliver presentation.Visit 5 companies.There is no formal process for reaching out to corporate organizations.3.6Maintain relationships with companies visited in past years.Maintaining any relationships that will be developed.There is no formal process for reaching out to corporate organizations.4.0Pr

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