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Paradigm Shift In Adult Education

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An updated strategy for Belair Online - seeking qualified team members.

An updated strategy for Belair Online - seeking qualified team members.

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  • 1. Paradigm shift in adult education From quantity to quality Strategy paper Dr. Georges Merx
  • 2. Agenda• Paradigm shift in adult education• Strengths and weaknesses of existing models• Opportunities to develop a new, more effective, and more satisfying institution of higher learning• The role of educator• The role of technology• The role and place of profitPage 2 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 3. Quote “Colleges have abandoned responsibility for shaping students academic development and instead have come to embrace a service model that caters to satisfying students expressed desires.” From “College, too easy for its own good,” by Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa; LA Times, June 2, 2011Page 3 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 4. Introduction• As many recent press articles have reported, adult education is in a crisis, at the very time when record enrollments in private colleges and universities have created a major new industry – Many students never graduate – Graduates cannot find work – Student loan default rates are escalating – Quality of eduation is questionablePage 4 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 5. Press reports• Some alarming statistics have been published recently: – [F]ederal data that suggests only 9 percent of the first-time, full-time bachelor’s degree students at the University of Phoenix, the nation’s largest for-profit college, graduate within six years. • Report Finds Low Graduation Rates at For-Profit Colleges. TAMAR LEWIN. Published in The New York Times: November 23, 2010. Data from report, “Subprime Opportunity,” by the Education Trust – [We]found consistent evidence that many students were not being appropriately challenged. In a typical semester, 50% of students did not take a single course requiring more than 20 pages of writing, 32% did not have any classes that required reading more than 40 pages per week, and 36% reported studying alone five or fewer hours per week. • College, too easy for its own good, by Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa; LA Times, June 2, 2011Page 5 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 6. Problems (1)• Academic rigor has given way to “customer service” – Not only at for-profit institutions, but also at public colleges and universities – The instructor/professor is to blame first for poor student performance – educator evaluation is based primarily on student evaluation • For many adjuncts, keeping their job means maintaining 90+% student evaluation scores, at the expense of academics• With public providers overwhelmed and underfunded, more education is delivered by private institutions – Quality of education highly variable; lack of rigorous oversight: purpose and effectiveness of accreditation have largely failedPage 6 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 7. Problems (2)• 40+% of post-secondary education is delivered by part- time adjunct educators – In some institutions, the ratio is 90-100% – Part-timers are primarily measured by student affection for them (student end-of-course surveys)• Going back to college is an option perceived as available to everyone, who wants to better his|her life – Many private colleges “end up” with the least qualified candidates• Online education is sold as academically equal to on- campus instruction – Based on accreditation acceptance – Yet the delivery tools are outdated and asynchronousPage 7 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 8. Opportunity• Leveraging the strengths of the best institutions of higher learning, public and private• Reducing or eliminating the weaknesses of the current modes and models• Order of magnitude improvement of the use of technology in delivering quality adult educationPage 8 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 9. Sources of strengths (1)• “Ivy league” strategies – Effective quality-centric branding – Acceptance limited to qualified applicants – Financial foundation based on substantial income generation, including endowments – Focus on excellent faculty • Competitive remuneration, access to valuable research opportunities, productive industry alliances – Strong alumni culture and networkPage 9 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 10. Sources of strengths (2)• Public institution appeal – Deeply anchored in the community • Strategic plan based on community needs and changes – Oversight by trustees – Good academics through effective separation of faculty and administration • Often labor union-enforced – Public funding sourcesPage 10 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 11. Sources of strengths (3)• (For-profit) private colleges and universities – Focus on business success – Rigorous business processes – Best use of technology – Advanced modularization and streamlining of learning content – Localization of access – Extensive experience with online learningPage 11 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 12. Needed improvements• Re-elevating the instructor from facilitator to educator – Empowering the primary service deliverer• Balance of profit motive and academic objectives/best practices• Critical review of effectiveness of current learning management systems (for online and blended learning) – Taking the use of information technology to a new level – Use of technology in the content of learning best practicesPage 12 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 13. Goals• High-tech, ivy-league-standard institution of higher learning• Rigorous academic standards and implementation of continuous improvement• Focus on high-value programs• Focus on educational effectiveness that results in high employment rates upon graduation• Use of emerging technologies in support of educational and administrative workflow efficiencyPage 13 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 14. Model• Curriculum development focused on providing modular resources – Not complete, prepackaged class shells• Class ownership lies with the carefully selected) professor – Educator teach, not facilitate – Supported with modular resources that can be integrated in the delivery process• Blended and online programs• Technology-supported in every aspect – Curriculum development, delivery, and administration; mobile, onlinePage 14 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 15. Instructional rigor Format Rigorous selection of educators Online and hybrid/blended Educator-centric organizational Based on proven best practices model Balanced profitability 60 hours/course minimum Belair University Advanced learning Business model management system Professor-student Brand-centric marketing communication-centric Mobile, apps-based, user- Paradigm shift from low cost to friendly interaction best education All learning, assessment, and Return to academic context, administrative processes with business and technology integrated rigorPage 15 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 16. Profitability (1)• Many for-profit colleges and universities have gone overboard prioritizing profitability – Underpaid, under-qualified instructors; excessive reliance on low-cost adjuncts – Mediocre facilities – Overly automated instructional processes, moving instructional content control from educators to a centralized staff functionPage 16 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 17. Profitability (2)• Profit should be a result of productive, effective operations that meet market requirements – Focus on the “right” student prospect population – Use of best-of-class business processes and tools • Operational efficiency through automation and integration – Excellence in learning results through use of educational best practices – Focus on strategic brand recognitionPage 17 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 18. Critical success factors• Critical-mass team of experienced professionals – Education, business/operations/finance, sales/marketing, legal, information technology• Funding for start-up operations and initial curriculum implementation – Estimated $2,000,000 requirement over initial 12 months• Implementable advances in learning management – proprietary sustainable advantage – Ref. Mobile Online Learning Institute (M.O.L.I. project)• Raid path to accreditation – Possible merger/acquisition strategyPage 18 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content
  • 19. Next steps• Define a strategic business plan with core work processes – Research in education and business best practices• Explore team development and funding sources – Set up a credible advisory council• Select initial programs and define curriculum core processes• Validate strategy with advisory council• Develop advanced, mobile learning management system for online/hybrid education delivery• Deliver first coursePage 19 ©2011 · Copyright Belair Services International LLC All rights reserved · Confidential content

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