Connected Learning: Blended Course Design That Fosters Social, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Development

674 views

Published on

A presentation given to the faculty of Wheelock College on May 21, 2014

Published in: Education, Design
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
674
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
6
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Connected Learning: Blended Course Design That Fosters Social, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Development

  1. 1. CONNECTED LEARNING Blended Course Design That Fosters Social, Cognitive, and Metacognitive Development Gail Matthews-DeNatale Graduate School of Education
  2. 2. Today’s Agenda • Introductions • Definitions & Conceptual Models • Possibilities & Examples • Goals & Vision for Excellence • Discussion & Possibility Thinking 2
  3. 3. Introductions • Introductions • Definitions & Conceptual Models • Possibilities & Examples • Goals & Vision for Excellence • Discussion & Possibility Thinking 3
  4. 4. Definitions & Conceptual Models • Introductions • Definitions & Conceptual Models • Possibilities & Examples • Goals & Vision for Excellence • Discussion & Possibility Thinking 4
  5. 5. Source: Blending In: The Extent and Promise of Blended Education in the United States http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/blended06 5 Blended/Hybrid Learning
  6. 6. Source: Garrison and Vaughan’s Community of Inquiry Model for Blended Learning https://coi.athabascau.ca 6
  7. 7. Source: Balanced EdTech – Balancing Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Technology http://balancedtech.wikispaces.com/SAMR 7
  8. 8. Source: Balanced EdTech – Balancing Curriculum, Pedagogy, and Technology http://balancedtech.wikispaces.com/SAMR 8
  9. 9. Possibilities & Examples • Introductions • Definitions & Conceptual Models • Possibilities & Examples • Goals & Vision for Excellence • Discussion & Possibility Thinking 9
  10. 10. 10 The Course How People Learn focuses on something we all have in common: learning. We will investigate learning across the lifespan from childhood to golden years, but because this is a core course in the eLearning and Before we dive into the first week's work, please take time to look around and get oriented. The video tour linked on the right will help you get started. Read the syllabus, browse the course, and post a hello message in the Introductions discussion. Instructional Design concentration we will pay particular attention to the learning of adults within mobile and online settings.
  11. 11. 11 The Course
  12. 12. 12 Social Presence: Low Threshold Water Cooler Area
  13. 13. 13 Social Presence: Low Threshold Interdependent Assignments
  14. 14. 14 Social Presence: High Threshold – ePortfolio
  15. 15. 15 Social Presence: High Threshold – ePortfolio
  16. 16. 16 Cognitive Presence: Low Threshold First: Imagine that you're leafing through a scrapbook of yourself as a young learner. You don't need to limit yourself to "in class" learning, but focus on recollections from when you were 15 or younger. What entries would be in your book? An experience with specific teacher? A turning point in your development or discovery of yourself as a learner? Civic involvement, camping, art, dance, or sports? Select one experience to write about, and tell the story in 200 words or less. Craft this narrative carefully, because it should be both specific and engaging. Second: Fast forward into your adult years, reviewing your memories of learning experiences that have taken place since you graduated from college. For some of you, graduation happened only a few years ago, while others may have been out of school for a long time. Don't worry about that, just look for a learning experience that took place in your adult years. What comes to mind? Workshops? Museum visits? Graduate school? Select one experience to write about and tell this second story in 200 words or less. Once again, keep to the truth as yo know it, but make it interesting.
  17. 17. 17 Cognitive Presence: Low Threshold Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning
  18. 18. 18 Cognitive Presence: High Threshold
  19. 19. Cognitive Presence: High Threshold 19
  20. 20. Cognitive Presence: High Threshold 20
  21. 21. 21 Teaching Presence: Low Threshold – Voice/Tone Turning our attention to this week's storytelling discussion, several observations and musings come to mind. What connections do your see between your stories and the readings about significant and meaningful learning? Angela's story about a seminar's attention to detail -- arrangement of space, lighting, and even music -- points to the sensory component of learning. What role does the setting play in making learning memorable, when and how can we engage several or all the senses of our learners? Kara's story about a canoe trip reminds us that learning takes place in many settings, even during a canoeing expedition. Perhaps our learning in school and at work would be improved if we injected some of the experiential characteristics of learning "in the wild"? Ashley's story about Tae Kwon Do provides us with an example that blends formal and non- formal learning. She also notes that there's a difference between learning the "steps" and perfecting technique. Perhaps approaches that engage novices might differ from those that challenge expert learners to take their learning to the next level?
  22. 22. 22 Teaching Presence: High Threshold – Informal Video I've missed talking to you via video messages, so thought I'd share a few words in that format. Feel free to read on below. However, in my message I do a "for example" think aloud about your professional learning plan, so you might get more out of viewing the video at http://youtu.be/mC-0-zNJpAs I've been reading your Week Four discussion, fascinated by your analysis of the readings, VALUE and DQP frameworks, the Masters program outcomes, and wiki work. A number of abilities bubble up in several places, such as the capacity to collaborate, communicate, and embrace diversity. But leadership and technology are the two themes that came up most often in your starter messages. This is very interesting to me, because they seem so different. For example, technology includes skills that are pretty straightforward to demonstrate -- you can put examples of your work with technology into your ePortfolios (in fact, your portfolio is in itself evidence of proficiency with technology).
  23. 23. 23 Teaching Presence: High Threshold – Flipped
  24. 24. Goals & Vision for Excellence • Introductions • Definitions & Conceptual Models • Possibilities & Examples • Goals & Vision for Excellence • Discussion & Possibility Thinking 24
  25. 25. Goals & Vision for Excellence 25 • Before • Organization, Interface, and Visual Design • Intentional and Creative Instructional Design • Integrity of Assessment Plan • Quality of Technical Implementation • During • Synergistic Integration of F2F and Online Modalities • Learner Support and Resources • Facilitation and Feedback • Peer-Peer-Faculty Engagement • Pedagogically-Sound, Technology-Savvy Interactions • After • Analysis of student questions, learning artifacts, and interactions to inform revisions • Incremental improvement (e.g. low to high threshold)
  26. 26. Discussion & Possibility Thinking • Introductions • Definitions & Conceptual Models • Possibilities & Examples • Goals & Vision for Excellence • Discussion & Possibility Thinking 26
  27. 27. 27 THANK YOU http://www.slideshare.net/gmdenatale/wheelock-5-2114

×