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Are We Who We Think We Are?

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Presentation given to the 2013 Sloan-C International Conference on Online Learning

Presentation given to the 2013 Sloan-C International Conference on Online Learning

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  • The field of ePortfolios is as much about questions as it is about answers.I’ll be pausing periodically during this presentation to give you time to reflect on key questions. They are also included the handout, along with the definition of key terms. You might want to jot down notes on the back of the handout, because depending on the time I might also ask you to share your thoughts with your neighbor
  • Using the metaphor of a artist, I want to spend a few minutes painting the landscape that serves as a backdrop for the many things that we will discuss today. Questions that we will consider includeWhat is an ePortfolio?What are the types of ePortfolios?What’s the state of ePs as a field of study?
  • Portfolios are not new – they’ve been part of art education and writing education for many years.As Peter Elbow says, if you automatically learned from experience, all old people would be smart. You learn from reflecting on experienceThe web format makes it possible to explicitly link the learning that takes pace inside/outside school, at the workplace, etc.The multimedia format makes it possible to reflect different ways of knowing, and to take a holistic approach to many modes of “communication”It’s important to note that most eP software allows the author to set levels of access, from public to within school to privateFor example, a portfolio could be private during the early phases while a student is documenting learning, and then gradually made more public as they develop and improveYou can also have more than one portfolio – more than one audience
  • How we talk about ePortfolios is a work-in-progress.ePortfolios can be many things, and we often invoke the proverb about the blind people and the elephant. What you think an ePortfolio is depends on your touchpoint. But here are some frameworks that resonate with me, starting with ones that include many dimensions and winnowing down to the most streamlined typologies.
  • Northeastern Center for Advancing Teaching and Learning Through ResearchPresentation developed by Laurie Poklop, who did her dissertation on ePortfolios at Northeastern. Her recent work focuses on ePortfolios as a new genre of writing (or genres of writing, because depending on the scenario there are different audiences)This schema focuses on the many uses to which an ePortfolio can be put. It also has implications for the viewership, sense of audience, and representation of self.Some are self-focused, such as those for reflection, developmental learning, professional development, and imply assessment interactions with programs and faculty.Some imply extensive work with peers, such as the project or collaborative portfolios. Some are externally facing, such as the showcase and employment portfolio.
  • Stony Brook’s representation also focuses on uses. It bears much in common with the Northeastern schema, but there are notable additions such as the teaching portfolioThere is also evidence of the academic purpose (e.g. assessment) in addition to the audience (career)Division of Information TechnologyLearningAssessment for LearningShowcaseCourseProgramCareer and InternshipTeachingPersonal
  • Cornell Academic Technologies starts to winnow things down and focus on the goal. Developmental (work in progress) Reflective (development of understanding)Representational (accomplishments) More important, their typology includes a distinction in ePortfolio structure (standardized or personalized)Standardized (aids assessment & comparison)Personalized (increases expression and ownership)CLICK TO NEXT SLIDE BEFORE TALKING ABOUT THIS
  • Just want to take a moment to point out the inherent tension between the two approaches:standardized and personalizedHelen Barrett Pointed out the challenges in her 2009 piece on “Balancing the Two Faces of ePortfolios” StandardizedAids evaluation & comparison – makes the process easier for teachers, programs, and accreditors, and licensing boardsGives the impression that the ePortfolio is determined by the institutionPersonalizedIncreases creative expression, engagement, and sense of ownership by the studentGives the impression that the ePortfolio is determined by the authorWe need both for ePortfolios to achieve their potential for improving learning (for students and programs)We absolutely need both -- The question is how to do one in conjunction with the other … we’ll revisit this later when we get to the case study portion of this presentation
  • I’ll undoubtedly leave out key players, but I think it’s helpful to approach this as a vibrant community that includes many wonderful colleagues.The slides are available online, so you don’t have to worry about getting all the citations down just right
  • No review of leadership would be complete without mention of Dr. Helen Barrett and her generous contributionsAs I mentioned before, she is the one who first pointed out the “two faces” of ePortfolios, and the importance that we maintain a structure that allows students to find intrinsic investment and motivationHas been involved with ePortfolios since 1991Retired from the faculty of the College of Education at the University of Alaska Anchorage http://electronicportfolios.org
  • It’s VERY hard to choose, but if you are new to ePortfolios here are a few recent publications to check outTracy Penny Light, Helen Chen, John Ittelson, Documenting Learning with ePortfolios, 2011, Jossey BassProvides a basic introduction, orientation, and recommended processeshttp://www.amazon.com/Documenting-Learning-ePortfolios-College-Instructors/dp/0470636203
  • International Journal of ePortfolioFounded in 2011 Edward Watson of Virginia TechPeer Reviewed, Open Online Journal that focuses on ePortfolio Researchhttp://www.theijep.com
  • Melissa Peet – Integrative Knowledge Portfolio ProcessIKPP is equal parts publication and workshop processDescribes a process for engaging learners reflection on and articulation of defining learning experiences, leading to a professional portfolio that is organized around core strengths instead of courses and categories of work.Published in 2011 and available through MedEdPortal - https://www.mededportal.org/publication/7892
  • International Coalition for Electronic Portfolio Research (IN/CEPR) - Founded in 2004 - http://ncepr.orgResearches the impact of ePortfolios on student learning and educational outcomes.Cohort model –institutions apply and, if selected, participate in a three-year cohort, each with its own research project. Central questions : "What learning is taking place as a function of electronic portfolios?" and "How do we know?” Leadership:Barbara Cambridge, National Council of Teachers of English, USAKathleen Yancey, Florida State UniversityDarren Cambridge, American Institutes for Research
  • Association for Authentic, Experiential and Evidence-Based Learning (AAEEBL, pronounced "able"), founded in 2008 Founded in 2008 by Trent Batson and Judy Williamson Batson. Trent was also one of the earliest leaders in the field of ePsFocuses on the body of theory and practice that is developing around ePortfoliosTheir annual conference, held in Boston each summer, is one of the largest events focused on ePortfolios in the country
  • These initiatives represent a community of practicededicated to discerning ePortfolio learning principles, design practices, and impact. They alsoindicate that the field has reached a tipping point in the recognition and support for ePortfolioswithin higher education. Within this context, ePortfolios extend the boundaries of learninglandscape beyond the confines of courses, programs, and schoolsthey are an essentialcomponent to supporting learning in a connected, integrated, and digital world.With this landscape in mind, consider connect to learning, the project that has most informed our work
  • Enter Connect to Learning, the framework that has influenced our work in Education at Northeastern’s College of Professional Studies the most.An executive summary about the program and its findings is on the chairs. A link to the project’s website, which goes live in January 2014, is also included in the handout we distributed.3-year FIPSE-funded project that began in 2011Coordinated by LaGuardia's Making Connections National Resource Center in partnership with AAEEBLOther key players are the AAC&U, whose VALUE rubrics informed much of the assessment work
  • 24 participating institutionsEach kept a program portfolio to document and reflect on their work with ePortfolios, and to share research. We shared our work every 6-8 weeks in the context of a “jam.”Jam = structure for sharing, discussion, and knowledge creation in a community of interestEach of us given a topic to write about in our institutional ePs and to upload documents/examples that illustrate our work. For example, how do you approach faculty professional learning? To what extent is social learning part of your work with ePs (social pedagogy)?Tour each others’ portfoliosFeedback, discussion, revision in an asynch threaded discussionRevise ePortfoliosC2L researchers (Randy Bass of Georgetown, Helen Chen of Stanford)and Bret Eynon, JuditTorokand the rest of the team LGCC, Laura Gambino of Guttman Community CollegeCombed through the portfolios (work samples, institutional data, documented practices, reflections, peer feedback, discussions)The catalyst framework that you see was developed our of that research
  • The framework integrates people (faculty, students, support staff), institutions (missions and programs), dimensions that are key to success (e.g., professional development), and design principlesAs you can see, it is rich and interconnected, similar to a mandala. We don’t have time to go into every sector today. I encourage you to read the executive summary that’s included in the brochures that I handed out. I’ve also uploaded this brochure to the conference materials.Please also check out the Catalyst website when it opens in January 2014. A link to the site is included in the other handout. In addition to explaining the model in depth, he site includes almost a hundred stories and promising practices that were contributed by the participating institutions.
  • This presentation’s case study of ePortfolios as a tool for curriculum redesign is structured around the Catalyst’s outer rimThe Design Principles of Inquiry, Reflection, and IntegrationThis framework best describes the way that we used ePortfolios as a driver for our program’s redesign
  • According to C2L, Design Principle: A fundamental idea about good practice. A concept that informs the organization and structure of a process. When applied with finesse, the principle improves the quality and outcome.Term borrowed from the field of visual design. So often we are “in the weeds” with learning design – focused on specific strategies and assignments. Design principles make it possible for us to step back and consider the elements of design that are generalizable and transferable to other contexts and use scenarios.
  • If we believe that these Design Principles are fundamental to effective learning for students, as educators shouldn’t we also incorporate them into our processes for learning and improvement of our curriculua, programs, and institutions?Inquiry: Investigate, ask questions, grapple with ambiguityReflection: Analyze experience to identify patterns and create meaningIntegration: Make connections that transfer knowledge across domains
  • INQUIRY – These are the questions we started withBefore I launch into our case study, I want to give you a minute to consider how you would answer these questions about the students in your own program or institutionTurn to your neighbor – take two minutes to confer. I’ll hold you to that time frame because we have much to talk about.Note also that you don’t need to have answers, as these are the starting point for inquiry.
  • Here’s one picture of the students in our Masters program, and it provides us with some useful information.Four concentrations: Higher Education Administration, Learning and Instruction (K12), Special Education, and eLearning Design470 graduate students60% part-time, 40% full-time (implies that many are working)94% of the students take half or more of their courses online, and most are fully online.Almost equal in state and out of state, made possible through the online format
  • What’s missing from the picture when we only look at numbers? What is their self-conceptualization? Their motivations? Their goals?
  • If we ask these students to document and reflect upon their learning in an ePortfolio, what will they would do with it?
  • If we ask these students to document and reflect upon their learning in an ePortfolio, what will they would do with it? How is this similar or different from what we hope they would do with it?
  • Here’s what one of our students did with it. Note that this screenshot has been used with the student’s permission. It’s exemplary. We will talk later about the findings from ePortfolios that were not stellar, but out of respect for those authors I will not show screenshots of less than stellar work,What’s important to this student? ePortfolios are a self description that provides a window into student self-perception, She has included an audio introduction in addition to her written introduction. She wants to communicate in a range of media formatsWe can tell that travel is important to her, and that through her travels she became a mentor to a woman in El SalvadorHer definition of “learning” extends beyond the classroom (formal learning) to include nonformal experiences, and so she’s added a section about that to her portfolioShe wants to be “that teacher” who is remembered and who makes a difference – but most of her depiction of teaching involves knowledge transfer. She has created a section that includes her lesson plans
  • That’s just one portfolio. It provides insight into the individual student that could be very valuable to faculty and advisors.What happens when we view the portfolios in aggregate, as a body of work?What do they tell us about our community of learners?How can we use the process of inquiry to ask questions,look for patterns, grapple with the implications of their difference and similarity, andconsider what they need from us?
  • The redesign process provides the organizing principle for the case study that follows
  • Remember the push-me-pull-you?In the beginning, we gave them a rudimentary ePortfolio template and asked them to incorporate at least one piece of work from every course into itThe template that we provided was relatively unstructured, but included embedded questions designed to guide reflection. It bears some features of the standardized portfolio, such as the “my program” section, but the approach was predominantly personalized
  • We also provided students with a mission statement for the ePortfolio initiative that was made available on an ePortfolio resource site and distributed via email.By pursuing a Master's degree, you are in a process of – metaphorically speaking – writing the next chapter in the story of your life. Your courses are one part of that process. You construct meaning on your journey, considering how your program informs and shapes personal and professional goals.Your ePortfolio is designed to help you document this narrative of growth to see how parts relate to the whole. We believe it will help you improve the quality of your learning experience, both during and after your time in the program.
  • Each person was given seven portfolios to review. The portfolio liaison examined all the portfolios. They were given these questions to guide their review:What can you tell about the person (then look at the collection of 7 for patternsWhat appear to be her/his areas of strength and need?  (focus on the work) 3. Given the strengths and challenges that you observe in the ePortfolio, what does the person need to thrive, both in our programs and after graduation?  What are your thoughts about helping the person grow as a reflective practitioner and as an agent of change?  Comparing that with your understanding of our programs, what do you think we need to emphasize, keep the same, decrease, or add in the curriculum?  What other suggestions do you have for program improvement?
  • Note that you can get some of this information from application essays, but those are often developed with the help of friends and editors. In addition, essays are usually used to assess the individual, not to gain perspective on the student body.1. More inexperienced than we thought2. Working, but not in desired professionInterested in “breaking into the business”3. Unrealistic expectations for what the degree would qualify them to doThought they could become a provost4. Not making connections across courses and across work/schoolUnclear in sense of priorities, self-assessment of strengths/weaknesses, rationale for the degree4. Not articulating a professional identity – presenting themselves as professionalsTell the story of one student who started with a picture of her wedding, then added a picture of herself at work, and then finally moved both into another location – speaks to the process of identity and professional presence
  • Unclear sense of audience?Facebook Culture?Needed more guidance and scaffolding on the Inquiry, reflection, and integration process (metacognition)Probably all three. In a professional program, to what extent are we accountable for helping our students articulate their development, communicate the linkages, and consider their professional presence? In other words, is it okay to use Facebook as a get out of jail free card?Image sources, creative commons permission:http://www.flickr.com/photos/mereteveianhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/sidereal
  • Before I tell you how we integrated acted upon the results of our inquiry, I want to give you a minute to consider ---
  • We took the many ideas, similar to those that you just brainstormed, and used a yellow stickie process to post, sort, group, consolidate, and articulate our most important competencies. Here’s what we came up withImage Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/38869431@N00/3703735824/
  • As you can see, the features of our redesigned curriculum map to the gaps and concerns that we identified in our students’ portfoliosI’ll give a brief overview, and then provide specific examples and a description of how the redesign plays out in the curriculum of the eLearning Design concentrationCohesive: Gateway + courses designed in relationshipIntentional: Mission and CompetenciesAuthentic: Signature Assignments, Experiential LearningReflective: ePortfolio, professional development/presence
  • A graduate of the Masters Program is a Systems Thinker Communicator Creative Problem SolverCulturally Responsive Note that we elaborated on these in the redesign documents, and that each concentration also has a mission statement and competencies
  • The Master of Education program at Northeastern University develops educators with the skills and intellectual acumen to be effective, to question systemic norms, and to anticipate and shape a more equitable, globally connected society.Image source:http://www.flickr.com/photos/photonquantique/
  • Designed to help think of the experience as entry into a professional field that includesCommunities of interest and inquiryProfessional organizationsVenues such as Sloan-C and JALN in which controversies and problems are identified, researched, and debatedUsing inquiry, reflection, and integration to improve practice.Because this course exists and is a gateway, we can draw on the expertise they’ve already gained in subsequent coursesIMPORTANT TO STRESSIS a five credit course in which they are oriented to both the pedagogy and the technology of ePortfolios, and our vision for their learning in the program. They learn about terms such as “competency,” “signature assignment,” etc.
  • Each course has one or two signature assignments that are 1) authentic work to the profession, 2) connect theory with practice, and 3) are designed to evidence competencies. They incorporate the signature assignment, often with a written reflection, into their ePortfolios. This is the final piece of work in each course – faculty view and assess the signature assignment within the larger context of their goals and other courseworkA signature assignment in one course can be revisited in future courses. For example, informational interviews in one course can be revisited in planning opportunities for experiential learning. The module developed in one course can be revisited to develop learning objects that are embedded in the module.
  • Redesigned ePortfolio template embeds the competenciesHowever, this is not a standardized portfolio that takes a grid/checklist approach. It merely places the competencies in closer proximity so that students can reflect upon their progress.It strives to strike a balance between making our vision for their learning explicit and providing them with space to make it “their own”
  • eLearning Design Concentration – A connectivist and design-centered approach focused on vision and leadershipTo take the kind of outside-the-box to learning design that we believe we are modelinganticipate and shape the future of next generation learning in a technology rich, globally connected societyprepares its graduates to shape the future of any organization whose mission involves learning, including corporate, non-profit, higher education, K-12, and government. Participants explore fundamental principles of learning & design engaging online and mobile environments, develop new models and strategies for motivating learners, andrespond innovatively to societal and institutional changes that impact the field of online and mobile education.(Images combined)http://www.flickr.com/photos/adesignaand http://www.flickr.com/photos/sharehows
  • This visual serves as a metaphor for the program. The blue circles are clouds of content, concepts, skills, and theories – the formal curriculumThe triangles are the forest through which you will journey, the professional workin which you put learning into practiceePortfolio serves a different purpose, depending on where they are in the program, but it also provides continuityIt’s the ground that supports the passage – also helpful for connecting school & work.
  • As mentioned before, in Education as an Advanced Field of Study students learn how to access research to keep your finger on the pulse of recent developments in the field, and how to use research to improve practice. This is also where they become oriented to the portfolio componentIn the second course, How People Learn, they take a look at the program competencies, consider strengths and opportunities for growth, and develop a professional learning plan. Instead of being handed a grid or rubric (standards-based eP), they use the research skills they gained in Ed as Advanced to investigate publications and studies on the profession, flesh out their own rubric – in this way they have an opportunity to make the competencies their own. The goal is to strike a balance between standards and professional personalization.
  • 1/3 of the way through your program, they take a course entitled “connecting theory with practice” during which they Review portfolio of work, consider what have learned about eLearning research and theory, Work with faculty and an employer to develop an experiential learning plan for a significant piece of work to complete as their biggest accomplishment in the program. They can elect to do this with your current employer, orwe will help them connect with a professional setting to do this work.
  • They carry outexperiential work independentlyfor the duration of the program, in parallel with your other courses, but they won’t be totally on their own. As with C2L’s partner portfoliosThey document your work in eP and the program holds periodic virtual gatherings – Using a process similar to C2L’s Jam structureto share work, discuss discoveries and challenges with both peers and faculty, & receive feedbackIt’s called Online Experiential Learning or Virtual Co-op
  • During the capstone coursethey bring it all together. They will use Melissa Peet’s Integrative Knowledge Portfolio workshop process to turn their program-based portfolio into a portfolio that speaks to their core professional strengths This also includes consideration of their presence and substance in social media – which can also be embedded in their portfolios. If they choose to port it to another platform that is okay, too.They Presenting their experiential work with peers, faculty, employers, and even the general public if they wish.
  • The portfolio process is designed to help students synthesize the formative work that they create during the program….
  • And develop an integrated, contextually cognizant, andself-aware professional presence that includes exemplary work
  • Here are comments made by students that echo the themes in the redesigned programTravisattests to the power of this method, explaining it allowed him to make COHESIVE connections and get more out of the program.
  • The signature assignments are authenticas Michael says, the Masters Program work is helping his institution rethink how they approach educationIn this instance, he worked with a team to develop a module or workshop designed to help subject matter experts and instructional designers in a corporate setting learn how to work together synergistically.The module was submitted to the course on Saturday, and he implemented it at his workplace on Monday
  • Emphasis on connectionsIn this quote Stephanie speaks to the many ways that knowledge can be formed and represented, considering new ways to reflect upon and communicate her thinking
  • I didn’t mention this at the beginning of the case study, but when we developed our program/concentration mission statements and competencies, we also articulated the distinctiveness that we desired for our program
  • Based on your response to the questions posed during this presentation, the Catalyst framework, and the other handout, what one thing could you do differently … in the courses that you teach? in your program? in your role within your institution?
  • We’ve covered a lot of ground in a short time, so please don’t hesitate to drop me a line or give me a call if you have additional questions about our program.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Are We Who We Think We Are? ePortfolios as a Tool for Curriculum Redesign Gail Matthews-DeNatale, Ph.D. Graduate School of Education Northeastern University College of Professional Studies 2013 Sloan-C International Conference on Online Learning
    • 2. Materials Online • Presentation Slides/Notes • Guiding Questions for Redesign – Questions that informed our process – Definition of terms – Links to ePortfolio practices, examples, tutorials • Connect to Learning Executive Summary – Site to be unveiled at AAC&U in January 2014 2
    • 3. Agenda • Backdrop: ePortfolio Landscape • Underpinnings: Catalyst Framework • Northeastern Case Study: – Program Context – Role of ePortfolios in Process – Redesigned Curriculum • General features • Example: eLearning Design Concentration 3
    • 4. Quick Poll How many of you … • Incorporate ePortfolio work into your teaching? • Have an ePortfolio requirement in your program? • Teach in an institution that requires ePortfolios? • Are a staff member who supports ePortfolios? 4
    • 5. The ePortfolio Landscape What is an ePortfolio? What are the types of ePortfolios? What’s the state of ePs as a field of study? 5
    • 6. What is an ePortfolio? Portfolio purposeful collection + student work + reflection (Paulson, F.L. Paulson, P.R. and Meyer, 1991) ePortfolio = all of the above … + web-based + multiple formats and media + links, non-linear pathways + capacity to share with a larger audience (Polklop, 2013) 6
    • 7. Types of ePortfolios Complex ecology No codified typology For example … 7
    • 8. Landscape: Types of ePortfolios Northeastern CALTR – • • • • • • • Employment Showcase Professional Development Developmental Reflective Project Collaborative 8
    • 9. Landscape: Types of ePortfolios Stony brook Division of Information Technology • • • • • • • • Learning Assessment for Learning Showcase Course Program Career and Internship Teaching Personal 9
    • 10. Landscape: Types of ePortfolios Cornell Academic Technologies • Developmental (work in progress) • Reflective (development of understanding) • Representational (accomplishments) Can be • Standardized (aids assessment & comparison) • Personalized (increases expression and ownership) 10
    • 11. Inherent Tension 11
    • 12. ePs as a Field of Study People Publications Organizations Projects 12
    • 13. Publications Helen Barrett http://electronicportfolios.org 13
    • 14. Publications 14
    • 15. Publications 15
    • 16. Publications 16
    • 17. Organizations 17
    • 18. Organizations 18
    • 19. Landscape Indicators Established community of practice Tipping point in recognition and support Key strategy for supporting learning in a connected and digital world 19
    • 20. Central Question What strategies and approaches do successful ePortfolio campuses employ to launch, build, and sustain their ePortfolio implementations? 20
    • 21. 21
    • 22. 22
    • 23. 23
    • 24. Defining Terms: Centrality of Design Design Principle: A fundamental idea about good practice. A concept that informs the organization and structure of a process. When applied with finesse, the principle improves the quality and outcome. (Connect to Learning, 2014) 24
    • 25. Defining Terms: Core Design Principles • Inquiry Investigate, ask questions, grapple with ambiguity • Reflection Analyze experience, identify patterns, create meaning • Integration Make connections, transfer knowledge across domains 25
    • 26. Inquiry: Questions to Consider • Who are our students? (strengths, challenges, motivations, goals) • What does our program look like to them? • What meaning are they making of our program? • How do we know? 26
    • 27. Case Study: M.Ed. By The Numbers Size ~470 Active Students Profile +60% attend part time Format 65% fully online 29% more than half online Concentrations 4 Gender 73% female Region 56% in state, 44% out of state 27
    • 28. Preliminary Questions If we ask these students to document and reflect upon their learning in an ePortfolio, what will they do with it? 29
    • 29. Preliminary Questions If we ask these students to document and reflect upon their learning in an ePortfolio, what will they do with it? How is this similar or different from what we hope they would do with it? 30
    • 30. What Does an ePortfolio Look Like? 31
    • 31. The Redesign Process Inquiry • eP Initiative launch (1/12/12) • Review of 150 ePs (8/12) Reflection • Curriculum Redesign (9/12-5/13) Integration • Implementation (9/13 – ongoing) 33
    • 32. 34
    • 33. Mission Statement By pursuing a Master's degree, you are in a process of – metaphorically speaking – writing the next chapter in the story of your life. Your courses are one part of that process. You construct meaning on your journey, considering how your program informs and shapes personal and professional goals. Your ePortfolio is designed to help you document this narrative of growth to see how parts relate to the whole. We believe it will help you improve the quality of your learning experience, both during and after your time in the program. 35
    • 34. Pre-Retreat Questions 1. What can you tell about the person's background, motivation, goals, and aspirations? How does this compare with your understanding of the profiles of students who enroll in our programs? 2. Looking at the person's work samples, what appear to be the areas of strength and need? How could that be addressed? 3. Given the strengths and challenges that you observe in the ePortfolios, what do our students need to thrive, both in our programs and after graduation? What are the implications for program improvement? 36
    • 35. Reflection: We are Not Who We Think We Are Many Were 1. Inexperienced 2. Unrealistic expectations 3. Not making connections 4. Not articulating professional identity 37
    • 36. Reflection: Why? Image source: http://www.flickr .com/photos/m ereteveian/ + + http://www.f lickr.com/pho tos/sidereal 38
    • 37. Reflection: Questions to Consider What contributions are you preparing students to make to society and/or to their profession? What expertise, abilities, and characteristics will the graduates of your program need to be able to make these contributions? 39
    • 38. Reflection: Questions to Consider What contributions are you preparing students to make to society and/or to their profession? What expertise, abilities, and characteristics will the graduates of your program need to be able to make these contributions? 40
    • 39. Integration: Revised Curriculum Characteristics Intentional: Mission and Competencies Cohesive: Gateway + courses designed in relationship Authentic: Signature Assignments, Experiential Learning Reflective: ePortfolio, professional development/presence 41
    • 40. Intentional Competencies • Systems Thinker • Communicator • Creative Problem Solver • Culturally Responsive 42
    • 41. Intentional Program Mission The Master of Education program at Northeastern University develops educators with the skills and intellectual acumen to be effective, to question systemic norms, and to anticipate and shape a more equitable, globally connected society. http://www.flickr.co m/photos/photonqua ntique/ 43
    • 42. Cohesive Gateway Courses • Education as an Advanced Field of Study • Culture, Equity, Power, and Influence 44
    • 43. Authentic Signature Assignments • Position Statement • Professional Learning Plan • Interviews with Leaders in the Field • Case Study 45
    • 44. Reflective 46
    • 45. Example: eLearning Design Concentration Equips graduates to anticipate and shape the future of next generation learning in a technology rich, globally connected society. (Images combined) http://www.flickr.com/photos/adesigna http://www.flickr.com/photos/sharehows 47
    • 46. eLID Curriculum Foundation Courses Ed as Field of Study How People Learn Models for Learning Design Professional Learning Plan Connecting Theory with Practice Design as Collab. Profession Capstone Social Media Revise/Present Work to Others Review Portfolio Plan Project Tech. as Medium for Learning Professional Portfolio Experiential Learning Proposal Experiential Learning Work Professional Integration & Presence Learning Portfolio Open Learning Showcase Portfolio 48
    • 47. eLID Curriculum Foundation Courses Design as Collab. Profession Capstone How People Learn Connecting Theory with Practice Social Media Revise/Present Work to Others Models for Learning Design Review Portfolio Plan Project Tech. as Medium for Learning Professional Portfolio Professional Learning Plan Experiential Learning Proposal Experiential Learning Work Professional Integration & Presence Ed as Field of Study Learning Portfolio Open Learning Showcase Portfolio 49
    • 48. eLID Curriculum Foundation Courses Ed as Field of Study How People Learn Models for Learning Design Professional Learning Plan Connecting Theory with Practice Review Portfolio Plan Project Experiential Learning Proposal Learning Portfolio Design as Collab. Profession Capstone Social Media Revise/Present Work to Others Open Learning Tech. as Medium for Learning Professional Portfolio Experiential Learning Work Professional Integration & Presence Showcase Portfolio 50
    • 49. eLID Curriculum Foundation Courses Ed as Field of Study Design as a Collaborative Profession Connecting Theory with Practice Open Learning Revise/Present Work to Others Review Portfolio Plan Project Technology as Medium for Learning Professional Portfolio Experiential Learning Proposal Experiential Learning Work Professional Integration & Presence How People Learn Models for Learning Design Professional Learning Plan Social Media Capstone Learning Portfolio Showcase Portfolio 51
    • 50. eLID Curriculum Foundation Courses Ed as Field of Study Connecting Theory with Practice Design as Collab. Profession Review Portfolio Plan Project Tech. as Medium for Learning Experiential Learning Proposal Experiential Learning Work How People Learn Models for Learning Design Professional Learning Plan Learning Portfolio Social Media Open Learning Capstone Revise/Present Work to Others Professional Portfolio Professional Integration & Presence Showcase Portfolio 52
    • 51. eLID Curriculum Foundation Courses Ed as Field of Study Connecting Theory with Practice Design as Collab. Profession Capstone Social Media Revise/Present Work to Public Review Portfolio Plan Project Tech. as Medium for Learning Professional Portfolio Experiential Learning Proposal Experiential Learning Work Professional Integration & Presence How People Learn Models for Learning Design Professional Learning Plan Learning Portfolio Open Learning Showcase Portfolio 53
    • 52. eLID Curriculum Foundation Courses Ed as Field of Study Connecting Theory with Practice Design as Collab. Profession Capstone Social Media Revise/Present Work to Public Review Portfolio Plan Project Tech. as Medium for Learning Professional Portfolio Experiential Learning Proposal Experiential Learning Work Professional Integration & Presence How People Learn Models for Learning Design Professional Learning Plan Learning Portfolio Open Learning Showcase Portfolio 54
    • 53. Cohesive Course content, concepts, assessments, and discussion can easily be forgotten or lost if one is not challenged to reflect. The ePortfolio empowered me to synthesize material. I can easily access information from previous courses, enabling me to make connections and get the most out of the program. – Travis D.
    • 54. Authentic I am very pleased with my group project results -- even more so that we could take the module we developed and, with very little tweaking, put it to use in our own settings. I have an opportunity to play a pivotal role in redefining education at my workplace. I’m very grateful for the knowledge I received and the two colleagues and Professor who helped shape my knowledge in this area. – Michael W. 56
    • 55. Reflective I am able to share my learning in a colorful, creative way. This format allows me to bring words to life, allowing my reader to see inside my journey and not just words on a paper. Some images and videos I chose to include convey meanings that are otherwise hard to capture. The use of video allows me to speak my ideas to my audience. Through my voice you hear my passion and purpose for my work. – Stefanie H. 57
    • 56. Redesigned Program’s Distinctiveness • Integrates practice with scholarship • Embraces next generation online and mobile learning • Explores lifelong learning and global contexts • Generates a portfolio of exemplary work that demonstrates vision and leadership in the field 58
    • 57. Final Question Based on your response to the questions posed during this presentation and in the handout, what one thing could you do differently … • in the courses that you teach? • in your program? • in your role within your institution? 59
    • 58. Thank You! Gail Matthews-DeNatale Northeastern Graduate School of Education Senior Faculty Concentration Lead for the M.Ed. in eLearning Design g.matthews-denatale@neu.edu http://northeastern.digication.com/gails_eportfolio 60