The Best of Both Worlds:Redesigning Your Course for Blended Learning<br />Gail Matthews-DeNatale, Ph.D.<br />Professional ...
Agenda<br />15	Workshop Introductions, Wish List<br />20	Blended Learning Overview <br />20	Recommended Process, Example<b...
Introductions, Wish List<br />Your name<br />What you teach<br />Course that you’ll be working on today<br />Your “wish li...
Overview: What is blended learning?<br />Combines online and face-to-face (25% or more of the course takes place online)<b...
Assumptions Survey<br />What do you like most, or expect to like most, about blended learning?<br />
Advantages of Blended<br />Faculty-student-student interaction<br />Durable record of participation<br />Persistent presen...
Assumptions Survey<br />What concerns or anxieties do you have about blended learning?<br />
Disadvantages of Blended<br />No set model – many decisions to be made anew<br />Significant time needed for planning, man...
Common Traps<br />Building a course-and-a-half<br />
Common Traps<br />Leading with Technology, Not Learning<br />
Common Traps<br />“Activities” to Nowhere<br />
Recommended Process<br />1<br />DesiredOutcomes<br />2<br />3<br />Learning<br />Experience<br />Evidence<br />Backwards D...
For Example: Oral History<br />Outcome: Conversant with OH methods, concerns, excellence standardsEvidence: Interview ques...
Break<br />Stretch your legs for 10 minutes<br />When we reconvene, you’ll apply the backwards design process to your cour...
Backward Design<br />Take a look at your syllabus<br />What you want your students to know and be able to do by the end of...
What Goes F2F, What Goes Online?<br />Online<br />History of the discipline<br />Videos, copyright permitting<br />Lecture...
Questions and answers(clarification, elaboration)
Student presentations
Groups: process (setting norms, meeting times)
Groups: reporting out
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Blended Learning Workshop

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Workshop given by Gail Matthews-DeNatale to the faculty of Mercy College as part of the 2011 Faculty Seminar day.

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  • NOTE: Reduction in face-to-face time does not mean reduction in learning or reduced contact with peers/faculty – usually provides more timeFlexibility – can be “in class” at a time that suits their needsAvailability – class is available from any location that has an Internet connectionPersistence – There is a durable record of student participation because all work needs to be posted to the course – good for increasing student reflection and critical thinking.
  • Flexibility – can be “in class” at a time that suits their needsAvailability – class is available from any location that has an Internet connectionPersistence – There is a durable record of student participation because all work needs to be posted to the course – good for increasing student reflection and critical thinking.
  • Flexibility – can be “in class” at a time that suits their needsAvailability – class is available from any location that has an Internet connectionPersistence – There is a durable record of student participation because all work needs to be posted to the course – good for increasing student reflection and critical thinking.
  • A different model of teaching and learningDifference #1: Search for a canonWhat should a blended schedule look like?What goes online, what remains F2F?Three tests and a term paper no longer “works”Difference #2: Rethinking what we doClosing the loopThe course-and-a-half syndromeHearing voices: from soliloquy to dialogue
  • A different model of teaching and learningDifference #1: Search for a canonWhat should a blended schedule look like?What goes online, what remains F2F?Three tests and a term paper no longer “works”Difference #2: Rethinking what we doClosing the loopThe course-and-a-half syndromeHearing voices: from soliloquy to dialogue
  • The course-and-a-half syndromeHearing voices: from soliloquy to dialogue
  • The course-and-a-half syndromeHearing voices: from soliloquy to dialogue
  • Kick start / follow through example – 3 questions, 3 comments
  • A different model of teaching and learningDifference #1: Search for a canonWhat should a blended schedule look like?What goes online, what remains F2F?Three tests and a term paper no longer “works”Difference #2: Rethinking what we doClosing the loopThe course-and-a-half syndromeHearing voices: from soliloquy to dialogue
  • Blended Learning Workshop

    1. 1. The Best of Both Worlds:Redesigning Your Course for Blended Learning<br />Gail Matthews-DeNatale, Ph.D.<br />Professional Development<br />and Instructional Design Specialist, TERC<br />Special Thanks to The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation andThe Simmons College Blended Learning Initiative<br />
    2. 2. Agenda<br />15 Workshop Introductions, Wish List<br />20 Blended Learning Overview <br />20 Recommended Process, Example<br />--- 10 Minute Stretch Break ---<br />20 Redesign Exercise: Goals, Evidence<br />35 Redesign Exercise: Assignment<br />30 Sharing Out, Tips, Final Questions <br />
    3. 3. Introductions, Wish List<br />Your name<br />What you teach<br />Course that you’ll be working on today<br />Your “wish list” for what you’d like to get out of this workshop <br />
    4. 4. Overview: What is blended learning?<br />Combines online and face-to-face (25% or more of the course takes place online)<br />Characteristics <br />Planned<br />Distributed<br />Integrated<br />Synergistic<br />
    5. 5. Assumptions Survey<br />What do you like most, or expect to like most, about blended learning?<br />
    6. 6. Advantages of Blended<br />Faculty-student-student interaction<br />Durable record of participation<br />Persistent presence (anytime learning)<br />Independent/active learning<br />Deepened understanding (reflection, critical thinking)<br />
    7. 7. Assumptions Survey<br />What concerns or anxieties do you have about blended learning?<br />
    8. 8. Disadvantages of Blended<br />No set model – many decisions to be made anew<br />Significant time needed for planning, managing workload, staying organized<br />Many new things to learn (both teaching and technology)<br />
    9. 9. Common Traps<br />Building a course-and-a-half<br />
    10. 10. Common Traps<br />Leading with Technology, Not Learning<br />
    11. 11. Common Traps<br />“Activities” to Nowhere<br />
    12. 12. Recommended Process<br />1<br />DesiredOutcomes<br />2<br />3<br />Learning<br />Experience<br />Evidence<br />Backwards Design<br />
    13. 13. For Example: Oral History<br />Outcome: Conversant with OH methods, concerns, excellence standardsEvidence: Interview questions, discussion posts<br />
    14. 14. Break<br />Stretch your legs for 10 minutes<br />When we reconvene, you’ll apply the backwards design process to your course. <br />
    15. 15. Backward Design<br />Take a look at your syllabus<br />What you want your students to know and be able to do by the end of the course<br />What will provide you with evidence of this learning?<br />
    16. 16. What Goes F2F, What Goes Online?<br />Online<br />History of the discipline<br />Videos, copyright permitting<br />Lecture podcasts<br />Discussion kick start, follow through<br />Discussions that require deep, extended thought<br />Drafts of work for peer-to-peer feedback<br />Portfolios of work (individual and/or group)<br />Course documents<br />Face-to-Face<br /><ul><li>Assignment introductions
    17. 17. Questions and answers(clarification, elaboration)
    18. 18. Student presentations
    19. 19. Groups: process (setting norms, meeting times)
    20. 20. Groups: reporting out
    21. 21. Videoconferences
    22. 22. Brainstorming</li></li></ul><li>Backward Design<br />Select one course outcome (goal)<br />One course “chunk” that furthers an outcome<br />Get started planning<br />Sequence<br />What will go online<br />What will go face-to-face<br />How the two modes will integrate synergistically<br />NOTE: This can’t be done in 30 minutes – the goal is just to get started!<br />
    23. 23. Tips<br />Plan Ahead<br />Think Incremental and Iterative<br />Focus on Design Principles, Not Technology<br />Set Student Expectations<br />Ask for Help<br />Don’t Overdo It (Course-and-a-Half)<br />Lead by Example<br />University of Illinois, Chicago<br />
    24. 24. 10 Questions To Keep In Mind<br />What do you want students to know?<br />What would be better achieved online and what would be best achieved face-to-face?<br />What learning activities will take place online?<br />What role will online discussion play?<br />How will face-to-face and online integrate and support one another?<br />How will you handle scheduling and supporting students as online learners?<br />What % online and face-to-face?<br />What will be your strategies for assessment?<br />What technologies will you use, and how will students become oriented?<br />What steps will you take to avoid “course and a half” syndrome?<br />University Wisconsin, Milwaukee<br />
    25. 25. Blended Learning Resources<br />Educausehttp://www.educause.edu/wiki/Blend-Online<br />University of Illinois, Chicagohttp://exedweb.cc.uic.edu/blended/facultyresources.html<br />University of Wisconsin-Milwaukeehttp://www4.uwm.edu/ltc/hybrid<br />Simmons Collegehttp://at.simmons.edu/blendedlearning<br />

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