IEEE Canada
Humanitarian Initiatives
Local Engineering Achievements
Glenn McKnight and Alfredo Herrera
November 17, 2010
P...
Three-year project, launched in 2008
Partnership between United Nations Foundation and IEEE: bring a more
systematic appro...
3
Humanitarian Technology Challenge Events
1 - 2 June 2009 Challenge Conference, Washington, DC
Exposure of project to lar...
4
Lessons learned during HTC
The quantity of resources needed to solve world problems is
greater that those available to a...
5
A World Problem is
A problem which has a global scale, affecting a very
large part of the world directly or indirectly (...
6
Reflecting the global nature of IEEE, R8 and R10
are now the two largest IEEE Regions
R9 – 15,401
R8 – 67,221
R10
73,662...
7
Deploying Technology for Humanity
The total land area is 13,056 million hectares. Divided up equally that would be
2.1 h...
8
Technology for > 6 billion people (‘02)
The size of each territory shows the relative proportion of the world's
populati...
9
A World Problem: Disasters
Territory size shows the proportion of all deaths caused by disasters, which
overwhelm local ...
10
A World Problem: Violent Deaths
Territory size shows the proportion of violent deaths worldwide that occurred
there in ...
11
A Tech Problem: Electricity Access
This map shows where people who have electricity supplied to their homes; it
include...
12
A Tech Problem: Cellular Subscribers (’02)
Number of subscriptions to cellular telephones around the world increased
10...
13
IEEE Canada (R7)
14
IEEE Canada (R7)
Canadian Humanitarian Initiatives Committee
Initially established to:
• support participation in the Humanitarian Technolo...
16
Projected benefits of HIC strategy
Respond to the growing need, voiced by members, to address world
problems in a tangi...
17
Current HIC Framework
Website and Virtual Community to pull together information scattered
on many IEEE pages:
• http:/...
18
Current HIC activities
HIC collaborative work:
• HTC Data Connectivity: Martin Murrillo, Pedro Sanchez
• HTC Reliable E...
19
IEEE Canada HIC student competition
20
Current HIC activities
http://ewh.ieee.org/mu/r7-hic/initiatives/student-design-competition-2010-2011/
The competition ...
2-3 surgical
LED lights for 12
hours
Cell phones and/or
walkie-talkies
8 AAA headlamp
batteries
Laptop computer
Portable
u...
22
Current HIC activities
http://ewh.ieee.org/mu/r7-hic/initiatives/student-design-competition-2010-2011/
Partnering with ...
Story…Design…Now What?
Nigeria
Burma
HaitiRwanda
India
24
Recent HIC activities – completed and next
Done:
‒ Had booth at EPEC 2010, presented paper
‒ Become familiar with IEEE ...
25
IEEE Humanitarian initiatives other
than HIC (PES-CSI)
26
Electricity for > 1 million in Haiti:
www.CommunitySolutionsInitiative.org
Mobile Module ConceptMobile Module Concept
2727
28
Typical Existing Supplies
54 V
54 V
LVD
14 V
LVD control
54 V
x 20x 20
31
Potential for partnership between
IEEE Canada HIC and PES-CSI
CSI:
Wind Turbine Task Force
Project Update
Co-Chairs:
Henry Louie, PhD
Carmen Cejudo
4 October 2010
About Us
• Formed in Summer of 2009
• Joint project between IEEE Power & Energy
Society and Engineers without Borders
 Se...
Concept
• Determine the feasibility of small-scale wind
turbines for electricity generation in rural
communities
• Constru...
Concept
• Feasibility Considerations:
 Cost
 Availability of materials
 Availability of labor/expertise
 Sustainabilit...
Approach
• Review existing “home made” wind turbine
designs
• Construct according to design
• Document construction proces...
Wind Turbine Design
• Selected “Homebrew Wind Power” by Dan
Bartman and Dan Fink as base design (
www.otherpower.com)
• Bl...
source: www.otherpower.com
Implementation
• Assemble a committed group of volunteers
with variety of backgrounds
 Practicing engineers
 Carpenters,...
Electrical Components
• Create 1 stator, 2 rotors
• Stator:
• Nine, 70 turn coils of 14
AWG wire
• Wired as a three phase
...
Electrical Components
• Rotors:
 Two 12” diameter, ¼” thick
steel discs
 12 NdFeB (“rare earth”)
magnets per rotor
 Mag...
Progress to Date: Electrical
Progress to Date: Blades
• Saw, chisel and sand
three wooden rotor
blades
• Blades must be tapered
on both sides
source: w...
Progress to Date: Blades
• One complete
• Two half-done
Progress to Date: Metal
• Machine and weld frame
and tail components
• LOTS of WORK!
source: www.otherpower.com
source: ww...
Costs
• Not finalized as of yet
• Notable costs (approximate)
 Magnets: $185
 Wire: $50
 Spindle: $70
 Resin: $60
Remaining Challenges
• Tower structure
• Suitable test location
 Potentially at a Puget Sound Energy wind farm in
Central...
SCIENCE AND
ENGINEERING
Henry Louie, PhD
Assistant Professor
Department of Electrical and
Computer Engineering
901 12th Av...
50
What can you do?
Join one of the on-going IEEE humanitarian projects
Participate in the HIC student design competition
...
IEEE Canada HIC  Presentation
IEEE Canada HIC  Presentation
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IEEE Canada HIC Presentation

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IEEE HIC Presentation for Nov 27, 2010
Members of the Humanitarian Initiatives Committee discuss activities and the history on the group

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  • Connecting humanitarians and technologists together, with suppliers and funders, to develop implementable and sustainable solutions; over 600 people currently access our online collaboration system - Spigit
    Four field tests of solution ideas defined by volunteer teams
    Involvement of all 10 IEEE Regions and 22 Technical Societies & Councils
    Project-managed by IEEE, under auspices of Steering Committee
    Two events held in 2009: a Conference and a Workshop
    Identified through focus groups, and documented, 37 areas where technology could be applied to solve humanitarian problems
  • 13,056 million hectares
    Scope: Population > 6 billion (‘00)
  • A hectare is 100 metres by 100 metres. 200 territories shown.
  • Territory size shows the proportion of all people with some electrical power in their homes living there.
  • IEEE Canada is the Canadian arm (as Region 7) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as well as the constituent society of the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC) for the technical fields of electrical, electronics, and computer engineering.
    IEEE Canada
    operates some 20 sections (local organizations) arranged in 3 areas (Western, Central, and Eastern Canada), as well as over 50 student branches in universities and colleges,
    operates two annual conferences hosted in different cities across Canada,
    publishes an electronic newsletter, a general interest magazine, and a technical journal,
    maintains a web site containing publication archives, a digital library of specialized lectures, and a showcase of Canadian engineering achievement (developed as a milennium project),
    recognizes the individual achievements of its members through an extensive program of awards,
    promotes student growth and development by providing scholarships and grants through the IEEE Canadian Foundation,
    provides resources (experience, funding, contacts, and so on) to assist members in upgrading their knowledge base, professional skills and networking capabilities - please see the various sections of this web site for more information and how you can become more involved in what our people do.
  • IEEE Canada is the Canadian arm (as Region 7) of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) as well as the constituent society of the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC) for the technical fields of electrical, electronics, and computer engineering.
    IEEE Canada
    operates some 20 sections (local organizations) arranged in 3 areas (Western, Central, and Eastern Canada), as well as over 50 student branches in universities and colleges,
    operates two annual conferences hosted in different cities across Canada,
    publishes an electronic newsletter, a general interest magazine, and a technical journal,
    maintains a web site containing publication archives, a digital library of specialized lectures, and a showcase of Canadian engineering achievement (developed as a milennium project),
    recognizes the individual achievements of its members through an extensive program of awards,
    promotes student growth and development by providing scholarships and grants through the IEEE Canadian Foundation,
    provides resources (experience, funding, contacts, and so on) to assist members in upgrading their knowledge base, professional skills and networking capabilities - please see the various sections of this web site for more information and how you can become more involved in what our people do.
  • Initiatives include relief assistance during natural disasters like ice storms and floods, socioeconomic development abroad, and also awareness initiatives at a in our communities.
    Driving Need (pull from outside of IEEE)
    Humanitarian relief and socio-economic development are ever present complex undertakings in constant need of a framework to bring together humanitarian organizations, first responders, technical experts, policy makers, corporations and philanthropic groups to address critical issues
    Desired Outcome (push from within of IEEE)
    Creation of group focused on humanitarian issues; expressed at various levels, for example sections conference in Quebec city
    Reaching new demographic by raising awareness of the expertise and relevance of the IEEE to positively impact humanity
    Opening opportunities for members, adding value to membership
    Enabling Framework (hub, launch pad, clearinghouse)
    Assisting sections to become proficient in humanitarian initiatives
    Creating systematic approach for humanitarian use of technology
    Collecting, classifying, and distributing information or assistance to support humanitarian initiatives, new ventures and collaborations in which Canadian IEEE members are involved
  • Launch the idea, build organizational capacity, and achieve impact.
  • Laura Stachel: “I first learned about these realities while doing doctoral research in 2008. In response, I worked with a group of Berkeley students to create an cost-effective, portable, immediately operational, plug and play solar electric system.
    These easy-to-use systems combine the power of the sun are being used by health facilities around the world. One switch and the sealed battery begins storing energy collected from the sun, another switch turns on the LED lighting system. The suitcases can power cell phones, walkie-talkies, computers loaded with medical text books, portable ultrasounds, even blood-bank refrigerators….They are rugged and last for more than ten years, with a retail cost including distribution of around $1000.”
  • IEEE Canada HIC Presentation

    1. 1. IEEE Canada Humanitarian Initiatives Local Engineering Achievements Glenn McKnight and Alfredo Herrera November 17, 2010 Peterborough, On “Advancing Technology for Humanity”
    2. 2. Three-year project, launched in 2008 Partnership between United Nations Foundation and IEEE: bring a more systematic approach to applying technology to solve world problems Focused on three challenges: • Reliable Electricity • Data Connectivity of Rural District Health Offices • Individual ID Tied to Health Records Humanitarian Technology Challenge (HTC) Project Framework Definition Challenge Formulation Solution Formulation Product Develop. Deploy. & Eval. Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 Phase 5 2012201120102008 2009
    3. 3. 3 Humanitarian Technology Challenge Events 1 - 2 June 2009 Challenge Conference, Washington, DC Exposure of project to larger field of stakeholders  153 attendees total; exceeding expectations  60 of the 153 from outside the US  Approximately equal mix of humanitarian and technology representatives  Presentations by humanitarians experienced in implementing technology in developing countries  Finalized documentation of the three selected challenges, ratified by working groups in a pre-conference meeting of 45 volunteers 26 - 28 October 2009 Solution Development Workshop, Washington, DC Series of working sessions focused on defining plans for field tests of solution ideas  Approx. 70 people participated, exceeding expectations (reps from 15 countries)  Two panels with five NGO representatives, addressing the realities of field test implementations and field test funding and partnerships.  Basic plans established for four field tests:  Providing an integrated power-on-demand electricity supply & mgmt. System  Establishing a network of 2.4 GHz and 5.8 GHz Wi-Fi data communications links among small rural outposts  Identifying patients by facial characteristics in a clinical setting  Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) linked to medical records 02/06/10 3
    4. 4. 4 Lessons learned during HTC The quantity of resources needed to solve world problems is greater that those available to any individual or even organizations. Many of the best solutions come from the places where there are the most needs. Without partnerships a viable idea may never be realized; as the HTC personal ID working group found out when they lost contact with the clinic they were planning to partner with in Africa. Geopolitical unrest can prevent a project from being deployed; as the HTC Data Connectivity working group found out about their planned field trial in Asia. A solution is not limited to a technological device or method, but should focus on people and community solutions to avoid being labelled as “cool ideas” looking for a problem to solve.
    5. 5. 5 A World Problem is A problem which has a global scale, affecting a very large part of the world directly or indirectly (people, animals, plants) Or a smaller scale problem which occurs many different times an places in the world, affecting different areas differently but with similar "local/regional scale mechanism”
    6. 6. 6 Reflecting the global nature of IEEE, R8 and R10 are now the two largest IEEE Regions R9 – 15,401 R8 – 67,221 R10 73,662R1 to 6 – 209,857 R7 – 16,259 R1 – 37,050 R2 – 32,137 R3 – 30,557 R4 – 23,204 R5 – 28,765 R6 – 58,144 IEEE Membership per region (2008)
    7. 7. 7 Deploying Technology for Humanity The total land area is 13,056 million hectares. Divided up equally that would be 2.1 hectares for each person. However population is not evenly distributed. "Secure access to land remains essential for diverse land-based livelihoods and is a precondition for sustainable agriculture, economic growth and poverty reduction." Oxfam, 2006 www.worldmapper.org
    8. 8. 8 Technology for > 6 billion people (‘02) The size of each territory shows the relative proportion of the world's population living there. "Out of every 100 persons added to the population in the coming decade, 97 will live in developing countries." Hania Zlotnik, 2005. Department of Economic and Social Affairs, United Nations Secretariat www.worldmapper.org
    9. 9. 9 A World Problem: Disasters Territory size shows the proportion of all deaths caused by disasters, which overwhelm local resources, that died there 1975-2004. It includes outbreaks of infectious diseases not normally found there. Disasters overwhelm local capacity, causing destruction and suffering, and necessitating a request for outside help. Disasters include droughts, epidemics, volcanoes, storms, fires, and events caused by accidents or indirectly caused by wars. www.worldmapper.org
    10. 10. 10 A World Problem: Violent Deaths Territory size shows the proportion of violent deaths worldwide that occurred there in 2002. War deaths are not shown here. The violent deaths shown here are homicide (murder and manslaughter), but exclude deaths due to war. www.worldmapper.org
    11. 11. 11 A Tech Problem: Electricity Access This map shows where people who have electricity supplied to their homes; it includes electricity sourced from a public grid or self-generated. This map shows access, not the quantities of electricity used. Note that 7 of the 10 territories with the lowest access to electricity are in South eastern Africa. www.worldmapper.org
    12. 12. 12 A Tech Problem: Cellular Subscribers (’02) Number of subscriptions to cellular telephones around the world increased 100 fold between 1990 and 2002. The ITU expects the number of mobile cellular subscriptions globally to reach five billion in 2010, driven by advanced services and handsets in developed countries and increased take-up of mobile health services and mobile banking in the developing world. www.worldmapper.org
    13. 13. 13 IEEE Canada (R7)
    14. 14. 14 IEEE Canada (R7)
    15. 15. Canadian Humanitarian Initiatives Committee Initially established to: • support participation in the Humanitarian Technology Challenge • explore interest in a sustained humanitarian initiatives committee. Now: standing committee supporting IEEE members in Canada that are participating in Humanitarian initiatives or building relationships that will enable our members to fulfil IEEE’s strategic vision. Need of a systematic approach to solve world problems Desire to demonstrate expertise & relevance of IEEE to positively impact humanity Using HIC framework to assist sections on humanitarian initiatives
    16. 16. 16 Projected benefits of HIC strategy Respond to the growing need, voiced by members, to address world problems in a tangible manner Enhance sense of belonging and pride in being members; benefiting membership development and member retention Provide members opportunity to use professional skills outside current job, as a career development path Provide opportunity for members to participate in Humanitarian/Social Entrepreneur industry: “to do well while doing good” Provide the continuity needed by sections to improve proficiency in humanitarian work
    17. 17. 17 Current HIC Framework Website and Virtual Community to pull together information scattered on many IEEE pages: • http://ewh.ieee.org/mu/r7-hic/ • http://ieeecanadahic.ieee.sixent.net • Offering web presence for members involved in humanitarian work Creating capacity and nurturing the networks of skills/people Facilitating sharing of resources like document templates, best practices, and lessons learned Collecting, classifying, and distributing information or assistance to support humanitarian initiatives, new ventures and collaborations Two anchor activities: • To raise awareness: CCECE (http://www.ieee.ca/ccece10/) • To agree on new initiatives: EPEC (http://www.ieee.ca/epec10/)
    18. 18. 18 Current HIC activities HIC collaborative work: • HTC Data Connectivity: Martin Murrillo, Pedro Sanchez • HTC Reliable Electricity: Glenn McKnight, Alfredo Herrera • Partnerships: EWB Canada, FBSC, WE CARE Solar • Donors: IEEE Canadian Foundation, Engineering for Change, IEEE Foundation, IEEE Ottawa Section Helping HTC Proof of Concept Test (PCT) of WiFi link for small rural outposts: pilots in South America; planned pilots in Asia. First HIC student design competition improving WE CARE design  To show how IEEE funding sources can be obtained  To engage members at section level in humanitarian initiatives  Define Open Hardware model for IEEE humanitarian initiatives  To gain mindshare with agencies, NGOs and public
    19. 19. 19 IEEE Canada HIC student competition
    20. 20. 20 Current HIC activities http://ewh.ieee.org/mu/r7-hic/initiatives/student-design-competition-2010-2011/ The competition is open to undergraduate and graduate students enrolled in a Canadian college or university: • Teams are required to have a mentor • Mentors can be a professor from the institution where team is enrolled • Teams can alternatively have a mentor from industry • Teams will have a minimum of 2 and a maximum of 4 members • There is no limit on the number of teams from a given institution • There are no entry fees • Proposal submission: Friday January 7, 2011 • Three top teams invited to CCECE 2011 for tutorial and awards • Cash prizes: first, CND$1000; second, CND$700; third, CND$300
    21. 21. 2-3 surgical LED lights for 12 hours Cell phones and/or walkie-talkies 8 AAA headlamp batteries Laptop computer Portable ultrasound 80W System 40W System Forty Watts of PV
    22. 22. 22 Current HIC activities http://ewh.ieee.org/mu/r7-hic/initiatives/student-design-competition-2010-2011/ Partnering with WE CARE Solar to improve their platform: a cost- effective, portable, immediately operational, plug and play solar electric system that fits in a suitcase. Developed with group of Berkeley students in 2008. Participants will be asked to study this system and to propose ideas that will improve it, extend it or innovate it. For example: • Simplify installation • Create collection of DC devices • Enable use of Li-Ion battery • Enable use of electric tool batteries • Optimize charge controller • Improve serviceability and cost • Improve enclosure • Innovate connectorization
    23. 23. Story…Design…Now What? Nigeria Burma HaitiRwanda India
    24. 24. 24 Recent HIC activities – completed and next Done: ‒ Had booth at EPEC 2010, presented paper ‒ Become familiar with IEEE funding sources ‒ Reaching out to Canadian sections, monthly meetings in Ottawa ‒ Paper created for the Open Source Business Review on Open Hardware To Do: ‒ Promote student competition, awards at CCECE 2011 ‒ Tutorial at CCECE 2011 ‒ Define Open Source Hardware platform for IEEE projects ‒ Submit proposal for sections congress Goals: • Show how humanitarian projects that can be organized and funded at the MGA region/section level (grassroots). • Contribute to IEEE objective of showing expertise and relevance to positively impact humanity http://ewh.ieee.org/mu/r7-hic/ alfredo.herrera@ieee.org
    25. 25. 25 IEEE Humanitarian initiatives other than HIC (PES-CSI)
    26. 26. 26 Electricity for > 1 million in Haiti: www.CommunitySolutionsInitiative.org
    27. 27. Mobile Module ConceptMobile Module Concept 2727
    28. 28. 28 Typical Existing Supplies
    29. 29. 54 V 54 V LVD 14 V LVD control 54 V x 20x 20
    30. 30. 31 Potential for partnership between IEEE Canada HIC and PES-CSI
    31. 31. CSI: Wind Turbine Task Force Project Update Co-Chairs: Henry Louie, PhD Carmen Cejudo 4 October 2010
    32. 32. About Us • Formed in Summer of 2009 • Joint project between IEEE Power & Energy Society and Engineers without Borders  Seattle Chapter IEEE PES  Puget Sound Professional Chapter EWB
    33. 33. Concept • Determine the feasibility of small-scale wind turbines for electricity generation in rural communities • Constructed in-country, using local labor and material if possible • Opportunity for a micro-business
    34. 34. Concept • Feasibility Considerations:  Cost  Availability of materials  Availability of labor/expertise  Sustainability (maintenance)  Comparison with other energy sources (PV, etc)
    35. 35. Approach • Review existing “home made” wind turbine designs • Construct according to design • Document construction process • Identify areas for improvement • Test and model • Deploy
    36. 36. Wind Turbine Design • Selected “Homebrew Wind Power” by Dan Bartman and Dan Fink as base design ( www.otherpower.com) • Blades based on Hugh Piggott’s “A Wind Turbine Recipe” (http:// scoraigwind.com/books/books.htm)
    37. 37. source: www.otherpower.com
    38. 38. Implementation • Assemble a committed group of volunteers with variety of backgrounds  Practicing engineers  Carpenters, Machinists  Instructors  Academics  Students
    39. 39. Electrical Components • Create 1 stator, 2 rotors • Stator: • Nine, 70 turn coils of 14 AWG wire • Wired as a three phase generator with 3 coils per phase • Construct mold • Cast stator in vinyl ester resin source: www.otherpower.com
    40. 40. Electrical Components • Rotors:  Two 12” diameter, ¼” thick steel discs  12 NdFeB (“rare earth”) magnets per rotor  Magnets attached using aluminum template  Create mold  Cast in vinyl ester resin source: www.otherpower.com
    41. 41. Progress to Date: Electrical
    42. 42. Progress to Date: Blades • Saw, chisel and sand three wooden rotor blades • Blades must be tapered on both sides source: www.otherpower.com
    43. 43. Progress to Date: Blades • One complete • Two half-done
    44. 44. Progress to Date: Metal • Machine and weld frame and tail components • LOTS of WORK! source: www.otherpower.com source: www.otherpower.com
    45. 45. Costs • Not finalized as of yet • Notable costs (approximate)  Magnets: $185  Wire: $50  Spindle: $70  Resin: $60
    46. 46. Remaining Challenges • Tower structure • Suitable test location  Potentially at a Puget Sound Energy wind farm in Central or southern Washington • Develop EM model of generator • Identification of trial deployment  Chikuni, Zambia • Identifying where suitable wind resources are
    47. 47. SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Henry Louie, PhD Assistant Professor Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 901 12th Avenue, Bannan 219 P.O. Box 222000 Seattle, WA 98122-1090 www.seattleu.edu Tel: (206) 398-4619 Fax: (206) 296-5962 louieh@seattleu.edu COLLEGE OF
    48. 48. 50 What can you do? Join one of the on-going IEEE humanitarian projects Participate in the HIC student design competition Participate in IEEE president’s Change the World competition Form a humanitarian committee in your section Contact the HIC to learn more Visit/use the HIC webpage and virtual community Donate to the IEEE Canada humanitarian fund http://ewh.ieee.org/mu/r7-hic/ Coordinator alfredo.herrera@ieee.org
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