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Whales

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Inquiry 2 Insight Final Project

Inquiry 2 Insight Final Project

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    Whales Whales Presentation Transcript

    • HUMPBACK WHALES: A VICTIM OF CLIMATE CHANGE by Lizzy Beato, Sam Clark-Clough, Ali Hentges, and Kristin Kerbavaz
    • Humpback whales have been on the endangered species list since 1966.
      • The biggest threat to the humpback whale population is no longer commercial whaling.
    • Now Humpback whales are being threatened by climate change
    • Humpback whales travel thousands of kilometers in the summer every year to the Southern Ocean to feed on krill and cephalopods, such as squid and cuttlefish.
    • Recently, however, when they finally reach their destination, they find it to be dramatically different from the Southern Ocean of earlier years.
    • In the past 50 years, the western Antarctic Peninsula has warmed at more than four times the average rate of world-wide climate change.
      • Frontal zones are predicted to move southward which means that humpback whales will have to travel 200 to 500 kilometers south to feed.
      • Area covered by sea ice is projected to decrease by 10-15%.
      • Loss of sea ice means a shift in species composition and less diatoms, which krill eat.
      • Less food for krill will result in less krill.
      • A loss of sea is will decrease whale foraging habitat and food supply.