Behavioral Modification Programs<br />An approachto eliminate negative behaviors and teaching positive behaviors<br />
WHO BENEFITS<br />Children diagnosed with <br />Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)<br />Attention Deficit Hyperactivity D...
Environment<br />Where are these programs implemented<br />Schools<br />Community programs<br />Group homes<br />Home<br /...
Does Behavioral Modification Work?<br />Behavioral Health Rehabilitation System (BHRS)<br />After only 278 days of enterin...
Full Purpose Partnership (FPP)<br />FPP was implemented in the Indianapolis, Indiana school system to integrate the princi...
Response to Intervention (RTI)<br />RTI is designed for early intervention and service delivery for students with social, ...
Assessment of Those in Need<br />In order to acknowledge children in need of such services a validated assessment tool is ...
References<br />References<br />Anderson, Jeffrey A., Houser, John H. W., Howland, Allison (2010). The Full Purpose Partne...
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Behavioral Modification

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Benefits of Behavioral Modification Programs

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  • Children with emotional and behavioral disorders are the ones who benefit most from behavioral modification programs. These programs use praise when positive behaviors are exhibited and correct negative behaviors by acknowledging these behaviors and teaching the children alternatives ways of expressing themselves.
  • A study conducted using three women, a nanny, a parent, and a teacher trained using behavioral modification skills training were able to implement the program with three different children, two having emotional and behavioral issues were able to see an improvement in two out of the three children in the study (Miles, Wilder, 2009).
  • BHRS uses a functional behavioral assessment of problem behaviors and individual interventions (Thoder, Hesky, Cavtilli, 2011).
  • This techniques goes further than correcting the actual behavior but looks for a reason behind the behavior and works to rectify that eliminating the cause of the behavior (Anderson, Houser, Howland, 2010).
  • Results showed that Tier I benefited 80%- 90% of the children, Tier II benefited 5% - 20% of the children and Tier III benefited only 1% - 5% of the children (Pavri, 2009). It could be argued that the group size differed but the least benefitted group happened to be the group that needed the program the most.
  • This assessment tool is used with students requiring intensive individual intervention for problem behaviors promoting appropriate student behaviors in school settings (O’Neill, Stephenson, 2010).
  • Behavioral Modification

    1. 1. Behavioral Modification Programs<br />An approachto eliminate negative behaviors and teaching positive behaviors<br />
    2. 2. WHO BENEFITS<br />Children diagnosed with <br />Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)<br />Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)<br />Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)<br />Depression<br />Other emotional and behavioral disorders (Thoder, Hesky, Cavtilli, 2011).<br />
    3. 3. Environment<br />Where are these programs implemented<br />Schools<br />Community programs<br />Group homes<br />Home<br />Any type of setting where you have children with emotional and behavioral disorders<br />Who can implement there programs<br />Teachers<br />Parents<br />Residential workers<br />Anyone with the appropriate training can efficiently teach children using a behavioral modification program <br />
    4. 4. Does Behavioral Modification Work?<br />Behavioral Health Rehabilitation System (BHRS)<br />After only 278 days of entering this program it was documented that 62.5% of the children participating in this study made clinically significant reliable changes (Thoder, Cavtilli, 2011).<br />
    5. 5. Full Purpose Partnership (FPP)<br />FPP was implemented in the Indianapolis, Indiana school system to integrate the principles of systems f care and wraparound with the techniques of positive behavioral interventions an supports (Anderson, Houser, Howland, 2010).<br />The goal to build school capacity while simultaneously addressing students educational health, social and psychological needs (Anderson, Houser, Howland, 2010).<br />
    6. 6. Response to Intervention (RTI)<br />RTI is designed for early intervention and service delivery for students with social, emotional and behavioral difficulties in school (Pavri, 2009).<br />Based on a three tiered model<br />Tier I (universal) – implemented school wide addressing social behaviors that all students are expected to demonstrate.<br />Tier II (selected) – targeted at children not responsive to Tier I.<br />Tier III (targeted) – for those that are unresponsive to Tiers I and II exhibiting chronic academic and/or behavioral difficulties (Pavri, 2009).<br />
    7. 7. Assessment of Those in Need<br />In order to acknowledge children in need of such services a validated assessment tool is needed. One such tool is the Functional Behavioral Assessment (FBA) (O’Neill, Stephenson, 2010). <br />Data is collected and analyzed and a behavior plan is written including strategies that reduce or eliminate environmental triggers, teaching appropriate skills and arranging environmental consequences (O’Neill, Stephenson, 2010).<br />
    8. 8. References<br />References<br />Anderson, Jeffrey A., Houser, John H. W., Howland, Allison (2010). The Full Purpose Partnership Model <br /> for Promoting Academic and Socio-Emotional Success in Schools, School Community Journal, <br /> v20, n 1, p. 31-54.<br />O’Neil, Sue., Stephenson, Jennifer., (2010). The Use of Functional Behavioral Assessment for Students <br /> with Challenging Behaviors: Current patterns and Experience of Australian Practitioners, <br /> American Journal of Education and Development Psychology, Volume 10, 2010, pp.65-82.<br />Pavri, Shireen (2009). Response to Intervention in the Social-Emotional-Behavioral Domain: Perspective <br /> from Urban Schools, Teaching Exceptional Children Plus, Volume 6, Issue 3, February 2010.<br />Thoder, Vincent J., Joseph, D. (2011). Using Reliable Change to Calculate Clinically Significant Progress in <br /> Children with EBO: A BHRS Program Evaluation, International Journal of Behavioral and <br /> Consultation Therapy, vg, n1, p. 45-66.<br />Miles, Nicholas I., Wilder, David A. (2009). The Effects of Behavioral Skills Training on Caregiver <br /> Implementation of Guided Compliance, Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, v42, n 2, p. 405-<br /> 410, Summer 2009.<br />
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