LESSONS FROM 17 YEARS OF GWP +
Assessment of 2009-2013 GWP Strategy
Dr Ania Grobicki
Executive Secretary, GWP
June 2014
Outcomes of GWP fundraising strategy 2009-2013Outcomes of GWP fundraising strategy 2009-2013
GWP Outcomes to 2013:
• 182 outcomes identified so far in the current Strategy period
• Steady progress during the Strateg...
Four Strategic Goals
• Promote water as a key part of
sustainable national development
[operational]
• Address critical de...
GWP vision
Water security
A key contributor to
sustainable socio-economic
well-being and national
development
Goal 3
Reinf...
2010 2011 2012 2013
From
outcome
mapping to
results
• Identifying
plausible linkages
between outputs
and outcomes
• Achiev...
Steps in GWP´s evolution as a Partnership (I) :
• Originally accepted both individual and institutional members
as Partner...
• Emphasis on establishing Partnerships at country and regional
levels as neutral multistakeholder platforms for dialogue
...
• World Summit for Sustainable Development (WSSD) held in
Johannesburg, South Africa
• Johannesburg Plan of Implementation...
Common vision :
Building water security world-wide
Innovative structure:
• Works at all levels in a non-hierarchical way
•...
(with important variations from region to region)
- 27% government/public sector
- 12% private sector
- 35% NGOs
- 19% aca...
Analysis of GWP partners by type and across regions
• 121 new partners in the 12 month period Oct 2012 to Oct 2013
• total...
Summing up GWP – An innovative action network
Knowledge base Policy base
Action network
Partnership at all levels + a netw...
The second step in the evolution of GWP :
A partnership supported by an IGO (2002)
GWP: Network, Partnership
and InterGovernmental Organization
“A partnership is not the sum of its parts,
it is the product...
Challenges :
# 1 : Working in partnership
• Difficult to demonstrate attribution
# 2 : Working at the policy level
• Diffi...
Financial Partners (core funding)
• Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway,
Spain, Sweden, Switzerland...
BUILDING FOCUS AND SUBSTANCE :
2009 :
« Strategy update»
« Building climate
resilience through
water security »
2011 :
« F...
Thank you !
A growing international
network since 1996
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Lessons from 17 Years of GWP

  1. 1. LESSONS FROM 17 YEARS OF GWP + Assessment of 2009-2013 GWP Strategy Dr Ania Grobicki Executive Secretary, GWP June 2014
  2. 2. Outcomes of GWP fundraising strategy 2009-2013Outcomes of GWP fundraising strategy 2009-2013
  3. 3. GWP Outcomes to 2013: • 182 outcomes identified so far in the current Strategy period • Steady progress during the Strategy and since 1998 • Lower progress in 2013 compared to 2012 : • gearing-up water and climate and other thematic programmes • Higher incidence of outcomes within programmatic approach since 1998 • Still very difficult to quantify and attribute benefits and value added Outcome level governance tools clustered by GWP ToolBox classification 2013 Strategy 2009 to 2013 Total since 1998 A Enabling Environment 16 55 93 B Institutional Roles and Capacity 9 46 100 C Management Instruments 10 81 128 Total: 54 182 321
  4. 4. Four Strategic Goals • Promote water as a key part of sustainable national development [operational] • Address critical development challenges [advocacy] • Reinforce knowledge sharing and communication [knowledge] • Build a more effective network [partnering]
  5. 5. GWP vision Water security A key contributor to sustainable socio-economic well-being and national development Goal 3 Reinforce knowledge sharing and communications Raising awareness, creating and disseminating knowledge, and building capacity Goal 2 Address critical development challenges Develop and advocate solutions to help governments take better decisions to improve resilience Goal 4 Build a more effective network Government, civil society and the private sector strengthen the partnership to improve governance and sustainable funding Goal 1 Promote water as a key part of sustainable national development Governments make water resources management a top priority and invest in its development GWP Strategy : • 4 Interconnected goals • A theory of change
  6. 6. 2010 2011 2012 2013 From outcome mapping to results • Identifying plausible linkages between outputs and outcomes • Achievement of Progress Markers based on monitoring and reporting • GWP´s influence on boundary actors
  7. 7. Steps in GWP´s evolution as a Partnership (I) : • Originally accepted both individual and institutional members as Partners from 1996 • Partners created Regional Technical Advice Committees in a number of regions (R-TACs) • Current Policy on Partners : – Only organizations/institutions can become Partners (from 1998 onwards) – Any type of organization (government/private sector/NGO) – Any water use sector, any level – Supporting the Dublin-Rio principles – Acting in accordance with the GWP Statutes
  8. 8. • Emphasis on establishing Partnerships at country and regional levels as neutral multistakeholder platforms for dialogue • Accreditation of Country Water Partnerships (CWPs) : – a critical mass of Partners in one country – various categories and sectors as stakeholders • 2002 : GWP Organization (GWPO) established in Sweden as an IGO with 10 Sponsoring Partners (States and UN organizations) • R-TACs transformed into Regional Water Partnerships from 2002 • Accreditation of RWPs in various regions ongoing – the newest region (GWP Central Africa) accredited 2009 – RWPs are semi-autonomous entities (Regional Statutes, Regional Steering Committee, Regional Strategy) Steps in GWP´s evolution as a Partnership (II) :
  9. 9. • World Summit for Sustainable Development (WSSD) held in Johannesburg, South Africa • Johannesburg Plan of Implementation • The ”IWRM mandate” : National governments committed to developing national plans for integrated water resources management and water efficiency (by 2005 !) • Sponsoring Partners formed GWPO under international public law as an intergovernmental organization, hosted by Sweden What happened in 2002 ?
  10. 10. Common vision : Building water security world-wide Innovative structure: • Works at all levels in a non-hierarchical way • Promotes inter-regional learning and knowledge-sharing • Supports joint initiatives – the art of partnership! • The multiplier effect Dimensions of Partnership : Interdisciplinary / Intersectoral / Govt – business – civil society Some lessons from 17 years of GWP:
  11. 11. (with important variations from region to region) - 27% government/public sector - 12% private sector - 35% NGOs - 19% academic / research / professional orgs - 7% other (eg. international orgs, media) KEY STRENGTHS :  A neutral multistakeholder platform  Inclusive yet clear structures at all levels  Strong knowledge base  Moving from advocacy to implementation Overall structure after 17 years of GWP :
  12. 12. Analysis of GWP partners by type and across regions • 121 new partners in the 12 month period Oct 2012 to Oct 2013 • total: 2844 partner organisations in Oct 2013
  13. 13. Summing up GWP – An innovative action network Knowledge base Policy base Action network Partnership at all levels + a network on the ground
  14. 14. The second step in the evolution of GWP : A partnership supported by an IGO (2002)
  15. 15. GWP: Network, Partnership and InterGovernmental Organization “A partnership is not the sum of its parts, it is the product of the parts' interaction.”
  16. 16. Challenges : # 1 : Working in partnership • Difficult to demonstrate attribution # 2 : Working at the policy level • Difficult to demonstrate impact on the ground • Difficult to assess numbers of beneficiaries • Moving from policy to implementation #3 : A voluntary association (not fee-based) • Constant challenge to raise funding at local level, at country level, at regional level, and at global level Some lessons from 17 years of GWP:
  17. 17. Financial Partners (core funding) • Austria, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom Designated fund providers (multilaterals) • Asian Development Bank (ADB), European Commission Regional, national, local support (incl.private sector etc) • Finland, USA, Coca Cola, etc Voluntary and in-kind contributions from Partners $64million question : How are we funded?
  18. 18. BUILDING FOCUS AND SUBSTANCE : 2009 : « Strategy update» « Building climate resilience through water security » 2011 : « Future Directions » Climate change Food security Urbanization Transboundary waters Financing water management 2013 : Thematic focus areas proposed following participatory global/regional strategy process Climate change Food security Urbanization Transboundary waters Ecosystems Energy security
  19. 19. Thank you ! A growing international network since 1996
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