2011 regional days food security op.strategy

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  • Consultative Group on International Agricultural ResearchThe Global Water Partnership’s (GWP) 2009-2013 Strategy commits to contributing to ‘achieving food security’ noting:“Producing enough food for one person for one day requires about 3,000 litres of water—or about 1 litre per calorie. When compared with the 2-5 litres required for drinking, it is clear that water for food production is a critical issue as populations and wealth grow. The trade-food-water nexus and virtual water are significant issues in water for food production. GWP recognises the importance of engaging with the agriculture sector and will convene informed multi-stakeholder negotiations to change the way decision-makers think about water and agriculture. The productivity of water, for example, must improve. Yesterday’s irrigation technologies must be adapted and upgraded to meet tomorrow’s needs. In addition, since 60 percent of agriculture in developing countries is rain-fed, it is also important to emphasise rain-fed food production. In this area, GWP will work with the CGIAR system, particularly with the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) to facilitate adoption of the recommendations emerging from the Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture and the Challenge Programme on Water and Food.”
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture
  • The World Food Summit of 1996 defined food security as existing “when all people at all times have access to sufficient, safe, nutritious food to maintain a healthy and active life”.The FAO Committee on World Food Security defines food security as:“Food security exists when all people, at all times, have physical, social and economic access to sufficient safe and nutritious food that meets their dietary needs and food preferences for an active and healthy life.”Commonly, the concept of food security is defined as including both physical and economic access to food that meets people’s dietary needs as well as their food preferences. Therefore, the US Department of Agriculture defines food security as:“Food security for a household means access by all members at all times to enough food for an active, healthy life. Food security includes at a minimum (1) the ready availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods, and (2) an assured ability to acquire acceptable foods in socially acceptable ways (that is, without resorting to emergency food supplies, scavenging, stealing, or other coping strategies).”The World Health Organisation takes the definitions of the 1996 World Food Summit but adds that food security is based on three pillars:Food availability: sufficient quantities of food available on a consistent basis.Food access: having sufficient resources to obtain appropriate foods for a nutritious diet.Food use: appropriate use based on knowledge of basic nutrition and care, as well as adequate water and sanitation.
  • IWRM clearly recognises the need for integrated land and water management(Defined as a ‘a process which promotes the coordinated development and management of water, land and related resources in order to maximise the resultant economic and social welfare in an equitable manner without compromising the sustainability of vital eco-systems’)Knowledge chain workshops on water and food security in the context of climate change – to develop regional platforms for generating and disseminating knowledge and climate information.
  • Need to work at the highest levels of decision-making, for inclusion in national and regional planning processes leading to effective development impacts
  • Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United NationsInternational Fund for Agricultural DevelopmentComprehensive Africa Agriculture Development ProgrammeInternational Commission on Irrigation and DrainageWorld Meteorological OrganisationInternational Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
  • Committee on World Food Security (CFS)Alliance Against Hunger and Malnutrition (AAHM)
  • International Water Management InstituteInternational Food Policy Research Institute Challenge Programme on Water and FoodAlterra is part of the Wageningen University and Research Centre concern (Wageningen UR), http://www.alterra.wur.nl/UK/about/ - The Netherlands
  • Asian Development BankAfrican Development BankIslamic Development BankInter-American Development BankInternational Land CoalitionAquila Food Security Initiative Global Agricultural Food Security Programme (GAFSP)
  • Joint WMO/GWP Associated Programme on integrated flood management (10 years in existence)Proposed joint WMO/GWP Programme on integrated drought management (in development with a number of partners)Water, Climate and Development Programme for Africa (WACDEP, launched jointly with AMCOW in June 2011)Water, Climate and Development Programmes in other regions (in development)
  • http://www.worldhunger.org/articles/Learn/world%20hunger%20facts%202002.htm#Number_of_hungry_people_in_the_worldNo one really knows how many people are malnourished. The statistic most frequently cited is that of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, which measures 'under nutrition'. The most recent estimate, released in October 2010 by FAO, says that 925 million people are undernourished. 925 million people is 13.6 percent of the estimated world population of 6.8 billion or almost 1 in 7 people. Nearly all of the undernourished are in developing countries. MDG1 = Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger, Target 1C = Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hungerThis is just the current situation – not even talking about future trends (population growth, change in diet patterns, climate change, etc.)
  • strengthening WRM capacities (modelling, hydrological monitoring & data collection, institutional development, etc.)
  • Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in AgricultureCGIAR Research Program 5 on ‘Water, Land and Ecosystems’
  • Foreign Direct Investments
  • 2011 regional days food security op.strategy

    1. 1. Achieving food security through integrated land and water management<br />GWP draft operational strategy<br />Regional days meeting, Stockholm, 17 August 2011<br />
    2. 2. Outline of presentationGWP Strategy 2009-2013 – Achieving food securityOur strengths and the opportunitiesFive work areas: 1. Influencing policy making 2. Advocacy 3. Linking research and policy leading to changes on the ground 4. Financing 5. Links with GWP’s agenda on climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction<br />
    3. 3. GWP Strategy 2009-2013 – Achieving food security<br />Contributing to ’achieving food security’ (SG2)<br />“[…] The trade-food-water nexus and virtual water are significant issues in water for food production. GWP recognises the importance of engaging with the agriculture sector and will convene informed multi-stakeholder negotiations to change the way decision-makers think about water and agriculture. […] In this area, GWP will work with the CGIAR system, particularly with IWMI to facilitate adoption of the recommendations emerging from the Comprehensive Assessment of Water Management in Agriculture and the Challenge Programme on Water and Food.”<br />
    4. 4. GWP Strategy 2009-2013 – Achieving food security<br />CA finding = there is enough land, water and human capacity to produce food for a growing population over the next 50 years…<br />… provided we act now to improve how water is used and managed in agriculture<br />
    5. 5. GWP Strategy 2009-2013 – Achieving food security<br />Food security: <br /><ul><li>Availability
    6. 6. Access
    7. 7. Use </li></ul>Integrated land and water resources management can contribute to food security through…<br /><ul><li>Increased water productivity (irrigated and rain-fed agriculture)
    8. 8. Increased food production in a sustainable manner
    9. 9. Secured production (protection against extreme weather events)</li></li></ul><li>Our strengths and the opportunities<br />Our strengths <br /><ul><li>Our Network: a unique business model across 2,400 Partner organisations, 80 CWPs and 13 RWPs – working at different levels and across levels (knowledge sharing on a global scale)
    10. 10. Common vision and mission, based upon the cornerstone principles of IWRM (“… water, land and related resources”)
    11. 11. Global and regional technical leadership
    12. 12. Neutral platforms, bringing all sectors (incl. agric.) together
    13. 13. Facilitator of IWRM planning processes
    14. 14. Links with RECs and development processes</li></li></ul><li>Our strengths and the opportunities<br />The opportunities<br /><ul><li>Integrated land and WRM recognised as the “best” way to contribute to global efforts towards achieving food security
    15. 15. Need to work together with others to create synergies + share knowledge, expertise and experiences
    16. 16. Need to bridge the gap between practitioners and researchers
    17. 17. Need to work at the highest levels of decision-making</li></ul> GWP ideally positioned to contribute to global efforts towards food security, by promoting and facilitating the development and implementation of integrated approaches to land and water resources development, use and management<br />
    18. 18. Work area 1 – Influencing policy making<br />Overall approach<br />Assist national, regionaland localdecision-makersin ensuring that WRM plans and processes are alignedwith agriculture and food security strategiesas well as with CCAand DRR strategies, and that these are integratedinto national development planning and decision-making processes. <br />Partners/entry points<br />FAO, IFAD, CAADP (Africa), ICID, WMO, IFRC <br />Strong links with WACDEP<br />
    19. 19. Work area 2 - Advocacy<br />Overall approach<br />Continue, together with or through partners, to advocate that IWRM is key for food security, through enabling increased and sustainable agricultural production. Raise awareness amongst the agriculture community on the risksto food security from the lack of proper water resources management and development.<br />Partners/entry points <br />CFS, AAHM, CGIAR institutions (CRP-5)<br />Local, national and regional agric. policy-makers, RECs, RBOs<br />
    20. 20. Work area 3 – Linking research and policy leading to changes on the ground<br />Overall approach<br />Work with research and CB partners and decision-makers (incl. farmer organisations) to make sure that research responds to end-users needsand to ensure uptake of research results. Promote capacity building activities to strengthen the ability of WRM institutions to work on agric. and food security issues.<br />Partners/entry points<br />IWMI, IFPRI, CPWF, Alterra, CapNet, and other knowledge partners and capacity-building providers<br />
    21. 21. Work area 4 – Financing<br />Overall approach<br />Ensure together with partners that regional and national agriculture and food security strategies are linked to IWRM strategies and plans in order to channel funding to integrated land and water management processes, programmes and projects.<br />Partners/entry points <br />FAO, IFAD, ADB, AfDB, IDB, IADB, World Bank (CAADP), ILC<br />AFSI/GAFSP, EU facility for food security<br />Strong links with WACDEP<br />
    22. 22. Working area 5 – Linkages with GWP’s agenda on climate change and disaster risk reduction<br />Harmonisation/coordination with the CCA/DRR current programmes and activities:<br /><ul><li>Joint WMO/GWP Associated programme on integrated flood management
    23. 23. Proposed joint WMO/GWP Programme on integrated drought management
    24. 24. Water, Climate and Development Programmes for Africa (WACDEP) and in other regions</li></li></ul><li>THANK YOU<br />
    25. 25. Water and food security – Inextricably linked<br /><ul><li>Almost a billion hungry people in the world – 1 in 7 people
    26. 26. MDG1 off track
    27. 27. World food prices crises (2006, 2008, 2010)
    28. 28. Current famine in the Horn of Africa</li></ul>Climate-related triggers (floods, droughts, wildfires)  crop and livestock losses, price pikes<br />Chronic water scarcity and poor water and soil quality  longer-term constraints for food production and food security<br />
    29. 29. Water and food security – Inextricably linked<br />Many river basins are ’closing’<br />Competing demands between water for food, water for industry, water for ecosystems, etc.<br />Irrigated agriculture accounts for 70% of the world fresh water withdrawals (even more in the poorer countries)<br />Better management and development of land and water resources, through an IWRM approach, are necessary to ensure food security<br />
    30. 30. GWP Strategy 2009-2013 – Achieving food security<br />Strategic goals 1 and 2  Five priority strategic elements: water financing, transboundary, climate change, urbanisation, food security<br />Strategic goal 2: Address critical development challenges<br />“…focuses on contributing to and advocating solutions for critical challenges to water security, such as climate change, growing urbanisation, food production, resource related conflict and other challenges as they emerge.”<br />
    31. 31. Work area 1 – Influencing policy making<br />Potential activities<br /><ul><li>Ensure that plans for expanding agric. production and ensuring food security are drawn up taking existing WR constraints into account
    32. 32. Harmonise national IWRM and WE plans with agriculture and food security strategies
    33. 33. Ensure that such plans are congruent with CCA strategiesand are well integrated into national development planning processes
    34. 34. Promoteand enable investments in water storage infrastructure and in strengthening WRM capacities to cope better with the challenges of meeting water and food security needs</li></li></ul><li>Work area 2 - Advocacy<br />Potential activities<br /><ul><li>Promotethe message that integrated land and water management is a vital component in achieving food security
    35. 35. Promote relevant policy messages from the CAand support implementation of follow-up activities (CGIAR Research Program 5)
    36. 36. Promote TB co-operationon WRM and development as a contribution to food security in TB river basins and at regional level; help to identify regional prioritiesregarding food and water security</li></li></ul><li>Work area 3 – Linking research and policy leading to changes on the ground<br />Potential activities<br /><ul><li>Participate in pilot projects in rural areas focusing on the water-food-climate change nexus and involving local communities and farmers
    37. 37. Scale up the use of methodologies for increasing water productivity in irrigated and rain-fed agriculture, through local level partnerships
    38. 38. Use local level pilot projects to ensure that national, regional and international efforts towards food security areinformed by local realities
    39. 39. Ensure that the climate information being made available supports the needs of both water managers and farmers</li></li></ul><li>Work area 4 – Financing<br />Potential activities<br /><ul><li>Work with FAO and IFAD to outline, promote and elaborate investment and financing strategies in integrated land and water managementin selected countries
    40. 40. In Africa, work with CAADP to promote financing of integrated land and water management within the CAADP Compacts
    41. 41. Work with ILC to support governments in assessing FDIin major land and water resources and infrastructure projects
    42. 42. Identify, prepareand sharewith financial partners (incl. development banks), fundable projects for integrated land and water management</li>

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