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Development Challenges in the Caribbean

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Address to the Global Water Partnership (GWP)'s Consulting Partners Meeting 2009, on the subject of facing development challenges regarding climate change, natural hazards and sustainable tourism in …

Address to the Global Water Partnership (GWP)'s Consulting Partners Meeting 2009, on the subject of facing development challenges regarding climate change, natural hazards and sustainable tourism in the Caribbean.

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  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • The FIT operates as an extension within ArcGIS and utilizes components from the Spatial Analyst extension. The FIT dialogs assist the user in manipulating the data to develop output that is usable by the Flood Model. The FIT ensures consistent projection, datum and units for the HAZUS flood model.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Jacob Opadeyi, Chair GWP-C Climate Change, Natural Hazard, and Sustainable Tourism: Developmental Challenges facing the Caribbean
    • 2.
      • Sea level rise would threatening vital infrastructure, settlements and facilities that support the livelihood of island communities.
      • Deterioration in coastal conditions through erosion of beaches and coral bleaching.
      • Reduction in water resources in many small islands.
      • With higher temperatures will imposing a challenge on agriculture.
      • Altered frequencies and intensities of extreme weather are expected to have mostly adverse effects on natural and human systems.
      Climate change impacts on Small Island States
    • 3.
      • The Caribbean region is the most tourism-dependent region in the world.
      • According to the WTTC, in 2004, travel and tourism in the Caribbean accounted for 16% employment, 15% GDP, 22% capital investment, 18% total exports, and 9% government expenditure.
      • The prognosis for the sector is that it could account for an estimated US$10 bill. regional GDP in 2005, increasing this contribution to regional economic growth to apprx. US$20 bill. by 2015.
      • The Caribbean Tourism Organization reports 22.7 mill. stop-over tourist arrivals and 19.2 mill. cruise ship passenger visits in 2007 with an increase of 19.4% and 20.7%, respectively, in the period 2002-2007.
      The Tourism in the Caribbean
    • 4. "Tourism contributes to global warming, and, at the same time, is a victim of climate change", Statement by the WTO Secretary-General F. Frangialli, on occasion of the UN Conference on Climate Change, Nusa Dua, Bali, Indonesia, December 2007
    • 5. Natural Hazards and Our Vulnerable Communities
      • Developments on drainage channels & steep slopes
      • Bush fire and clear cutting of vegetation (bamboo)
      • Unapproved development and land squatting
      • Indiscriminate dumping on drainage channels
      • Low level of awareness on the impact of natural hazards & climate change
    • 6.
      • How can tourism react to mitigate the impacts of climate change? IPCC [28] :
      • Adaptation option/strategy: Diversification of tourism attractions and revenues.
      • Underlying policy framework: Integrated planning (e. g. carrying capacity; enforcing building codes, linkages with other sectors); financial incentives, e. g. subsidies and tax credits.
      • Key constraints to implementation: Appeal/marketing of new attractions; financial and logistical challenges; potential adverse impact on other sectors.
    • 7.
      • What have we done so far?
      • Convening of High Level Sessions of Caribbean Ministers with responsibilities for Water: Impact of Climate Change on the Water Sector
      • Workshop on the Impact of Climate Change on Water Resources of the Caribbean (Water Managers).
      • Training materials and workshops on Water Use Efficiency for the Tourism Sector
      • Training materials and workshops on Water Use Efficiency for the Agricultural Sector
    • 8.
      • What can we do to address the challenges and constrains?
      • Output 2a:
      • Building awareness of the boundary partners on the linkages between Climate Change, Water Resources, Tourism, and Disaster Risk reduction through:
      • Dialogues among boundary partners (CC adaption options)
      • Training workshops (water use efficiency, water demand management)
      • Public awareness materials
      • Support for action research (toolbox).
    • 9.
      • Output 2b:
      • With support from boundary actors, promote and facilitate the development of:
      • Regional climate change adaptation plans for the water sectors
      • Regional plans and policies on water use efficiency for the tourism and agricultural sectors
      • Regional model, plans and policies on Rainwater Harvesting
      • Regional training manual on Conflict Resolution in IWRM
    • 10.
      • Output 2c:
      • With support from GWP-TEC, promote and facilitate the development of:
      • Rainwater harvesting guidebook
      • Guidebook of implementing IWRM plans and policies
      • Training materials flood risk management
      • Water use efficiency for the Tourism Sector
    • 11. What support and Resources are required to address the outcome challenges? Boundary Partners Support/Resources Required CARICOM Political support for regional policies, plans, and strategies CCCCC Provide research outputs on the impact of CC Provide research outputs of CC adaptation strategies Caribbean WaterNet Training manuals and training workshops CTO Financial support for dialogues and toolbox Support dissemination and use of results by its members CIMH Provide access to climate data to support action research CDERA Support dissemination and use of results by its members CDB Financial support for policies and plans development Promote the use of policies and plans GWP Access to GWP-TEC and core funding Publications and dissemination of ToolBox

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