Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Development Evaluation – Marco Segone UNICEF
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Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Development Evaluation – Marco Segone UNICEF

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Presentation at the Evaluation Day 2011, HAUS Helsinki

Presentation at the Evaluation Day 2011, HAUS Helsinki

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Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Development Evaluation – Marco Segone UNICEF Integrating Human Rights and Gender Equality in Development Evaluation – Marco Segone UNICEF Presentation Transcript

  • Integrating Human Rights and Equity in evaluations Marco Segone, UNICEF Evaluation Office Co-Chair UNEG TF on National Evaluation Capacity Former IOCE Vice-President
  • Outline
    • What are Human Rights and Equity?
    • Why does Equity matter?
    • What is an equity-focused and Human Rights sensitive evaluation?
    • How to manage an Equity-focused and Human Rights sensitive evaluation?
  • What are Human Rights and Equity?
  • Defining Human Rights
    • Human rights are the civil, cultural, economic, political and social rights inherent to all human beings, without discrimination .
    • They are universal, inalienable, interdependent, indivisible, equal and non‑discriminatory.
    • Human rights are expressed in and guaranteed by normative frameworks and laws that lay down the obligations of States
    • All UN interventions have a mandate to address human rights.
  • Equity as a strategy for Human Rights
    • Equity means that all children have an opportunity to survive, develop, and reach their full potential, without discrimination , bias or favoritism
    • Inequities are disparities between population groups that are not driven by biology, are avoidable and unfair.
    • Equity is therefore based on notions of fairness and social justice
  • Drivers: Income
    • Nepal stunting trends and equity
    Source: DHS data. From NAGA pg. 27
  • Drivers: locations District level Data - Nyanza Province
    • Significant increases in PMTCT coverage: 24% to 73% between 2004-2009
    • Largely on track to reach Universal Access goal of 80%
    • However, reaching the last 20% will need refocusing strategies and other context specific analyses by province.
  • Drivers: locations and Ethnicity In Cambodia, % of 17 years olds who NEVER attended school
  • Drivers: Gender
    • The majority of out-of-school children continue to be girls (53%); achieving gender parity would mean 3.6 million more girls in primary school
  • Drivers: Disabilities
    • 90% of children with disabilities in developing countries do not attend school
  • Multidimentionality of Equity
  • Why does equity matter?
  • Why equity
    • Inequity constitutes a violation of human rights and hampers the equitable achievements on Human Development and MDGs
  • Success in reducing child deaths in national averages… Trends in the under-five mortality rate (per 1000 live births), 1990 to 2009
  • … masking growing inequalities within countries
    • Two-thirds of the countries that have made strong progress in reducing the under-five mortality rate have shown worsening inequities since 1990.
    • In short, gaps between better off and worse off have increased.
    • This suggests that the delivery, financing, and use of essential services for children favour the better off.
  • All rights for all children everywhere, by prioritizing the most deprived Graph 1: % of children (7-14 years old) out of school, by race/ethnicity 2000 Baseline and goals for national average, black and white children 2010 Goal: reduce by 50% the national average and the equity ratio between black and white children 5.5 2.8 3.8 2.2 6.9 3.1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Equity Ratio : 1,8 Equity ratio: 1,4 Black children White children National average
  • Why equity
    •  
    • Equity has a significant positive impact in reducing poverty
    • Equity has a positive impact on economic growth
    •  
  • Why equity
    • Equity has a positive impact in the construction of a socially fair and democratic society
    • Prolonged inequity may lead to the “naturalization” of inequity
  • What is an equity-focused and Human rights sensitive evaluation?
  • What is an equity-focused evaluation?
    • A judgment made of the relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, impact and sustainability of interventions on equitable development results.
  • Purposes of equity-focused evaluation
      • Accountability
      • Organizational learning and improvement
      • Evidence-based policy advocacy
      • Contribute to Knowledge Management
      • Empowerment of worst-off groups
      • National Capacity development for equity-focused M&E systems
  • HOW to manage Equity-focused evaluations?
    • Evaluation for Equitable Development Results
    • [to be published early 2012]
  • Key Steps 1. Preparing for the EFE 1 2. Preparing the ToR of an EFE 3. Designing the evaluation 4. Collecting/ analysing evidence 4 3 2 5. Findings, conclusion and reccs 6 5 6. Utilizing the evaluation MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS
  • Key Steps 1 4 3 2 6 5 MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS 1. Preparing for the EFE
  • . Preparing for the Equity-focused evaluation
    • Determining the evaluability of the intervention’s equity dimensions
    • Identifying evaluation stakeholders , including worst-off
    • Identifying intended use by intended users
    • Identifying potential challenges in promoting and implementing Equity-focused evaluations
    • Ensuring appropriate budget
  • Key Steps 1 4 3 2 6 5 1. Preparing for the EFE 2. Preparing the ToR of an EFE
  • Preparing the ToR of an EFE
    • Defining the scope and purpose of the evaluation
    • Framing evaluation questions focusing on equity
    • Selecting technically-strong and culturally-sensitive evaluation team
  • Key Steps 1 4 3 2 6 5 1. Preparing for the EFE 2. Preparing the ToR of an EFE 3. Designing the evaluation
  • Designing the evaluation
    • Selecting the appropriate evaluation framework
      • Theory of Change
      • Bottleneck analysis
  • Bottleneck supply and demand framework: factors affecting use of services by vulnerable populations Use of services by vulnerable population
    • Supply side factors
    • Coverage
    • Budgets and available resources
    • Demand side factors
    • Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of vulnerable groups
    • Community ownership
    • Culturally acceptable services
    • Culturally sensitive staff
    • distance
    • cost of travel and fees
    • available transport
    • time
    • poverty
    • Contextual factors
    • Economic
    • Political
    • Institutional
    • Legal and administrative
    • Environmental
  • Designing the evaluation
    • Selecting the appropriate evaluation framework
    • Selecting the appropriate evaluation design
  • Selecting the appropriate evaluation design and tools
    • Mix-Methods
    Use of services by vulnerable population
    • Supply side factors
    • Coverage
    • Budgets and available resources
    • Culturally acceptable services
    • Culturally sensitive staff
    • Contextual factors
    • Economic
    • Political
    • Institutional
    • Legal and administrative
    • Environmental
    • Demand side factors
    • Knowledge, Attitudes and Practice of vulnerable groups
    • Community ownership
    • Culturally acceptable services
    • Culturally sensitive staff
    • distance
    • cost of travel and fees
    • available transport
    • time
    • poverty
  • Designing the evaluation
    • Selecting the appropriate evaluation framework
    • Selecting the appropriate evaluation design
    • Selecting the appropriate evaluation methods
  • Key Steps 1. Preparing for the EFE 1 2. Preparing the ToR of an EFE 3. Designing the evaluation 4. Collecting/ analysing evidence 4 3 2 6 5 MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS
  • Selecting the appropriate evaluation methods
  • Menu of tools to evaluate complex equity-focused policies and programmes
    • Systems approach to evaluation
    • Unpacking complex policies into components that can more easily be evaluated
    • Pipeline designs
    • Policy gap analysis
    • Using other countries or sectors as the comparison group
    • Concept mapping
    • Portfolio analysis
  • Key Steps 1. Preparing for the EFE 1 2. Preparing the ToR of an EFE 3. Designing the evaluation 4. Collecting/ analysing evidence 4 3 2 5. Findings, conclusion and reccs 6 5 MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS
  • Key Steps 1. Preparing for the EFE 1 2. Preparing the ToR of an EFE 3. Designing the evaluation 4. Collecting/ analysing evidence 4 3 2 5. Findings, conclusion and reccs 6 5 6. Utilizing the evaluation MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS * MANAGE RISKS
  • Utilizing the evaluation
    • Process use
    • Preparing the evaluation report and alternative forms of reporting
    • Disseminating the evaluation and preparing a Management Response
    • Engage the intended users
  • In conclusion:
    • Focus on understanding how change comes about, not just what happens
    • Focus on inequities (disaggregated data), contextual factors (socio-economic and cultural context; power relationships)
    • Recognise complex systems, and use appropriate methods, including Mixed methods
    • Support worst-off groups to be agents of their own development, not passive beneficiaries
  • Do you want more?
  • Visit the electronic resource center at www.MyMandE.org
  • Thank you