Establishing evaluability during planning and implementation of development cooperation, Paul Silfverberg, Ministry for Foreign Affairs
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Establishing evaluability during planning and implementation of development cooperation, Paul Silfverberg, Ministry for Foreign Affairs

on

  • 1,220 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,220
Views on SlideShare
1,220
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
37
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Establishing evaluability during planning and implementation of development cooperation, Paul Silfverberg, Ministry for Foreign Affairs Establishing evaluability during planning and implementation of development cooperation, Paul Silfverberg, Ministry for Foreign Affairs Presentation Transcript

  • DEVELOPMENT EVALUATION DAY 2011 Establishing evaluability during planning and implementation of development cooperation Ministry for Foreign Affairs
  • Project Cycle Mid-term Evaluation PROGRAMMING IDENTIFICATION FORMULATION Appraisal Monitoring WORK PLANNING FINANCING DECISION, AGREEMENTS Evaluation IMPLEMENTATION
  • Project Cycle Management
    • Challenge: The project plan is prepared when we know least!
    • The project should become a learning process .
    • Principles:
      • Dividing planning into three phases: Identification – project formulation – work planning during implementation
      • Establishment of a monitoring and evaluation system to feed lessons learned to planning
      • Flexibility through a clear decision making system that approves changes to plans when justified
      • Project document / Logical framework as a basis for work planning, monitoring and evaluation
  • Project Logic WHY and BY WHOM is the project needed? WHAT IMPROVEMENT / CHANGE will the project cause? HOW TO VERIFY / MEASURE the improvement? HOW will the results be achieved? WHAT to do? WHAT INPUTS AND RESOURCES are needed? PROBLEMS OPPORTUNITIES BENEFICIARIES OVERALL OBJECTIVE & INDICATORS PROJECT PURPOSE & INDICATORS RESULTS & INDICATORS MEANS ACTIVITIES
  • LogFrame Matrix Project description (“Intervention Logic”) Indicators Sources of Verification Assumptions Overall objective Measures the extent to which the contribution to the overall objective has been made Sources of information and methods used to collect and report it including who and when Project purpose Helps answer the question “How will we know if the purpose has been achieved?” including quantity, quality, time Sources of information and methods used to collect and report it including who and when Assumptions Results Helps answer the question “How will we know if the results have been delivered?” including quantity, quality, time Sources of information and methods used to collect and report it including who and when Assumptions Activities (may be used to summarise resources/means) (may be used to summarise the costs) Assumptions
  • Project planning provides a sound basis for evaluation when ...
    • objectives are clearly defined at different levels – overall objectives, project purpose, results
    • objectives describe: what should change? (not: what will be done?)
    • indicators and target values are defined for all objectives
    • baseline data is available for the indicators (or produced during of project inception through studies)
    • a monitoring and reporting system is in place producing systematic information against the objectives / LogFrame
  • Monitoring vs. evaluation? Dimension Monitoring Evaluation Timing
    • Continuous
    • Periodic
    Scope
    • Use of means/inputs
    • Implementation of activities
    • Achievement of objectives
    • Problem solving
    • Achievement of objectives
    • Relevance of objectives and
    • implementation strategies
    • Lessons learned
    Those involved
    • Those who manage and
    • implement the programme
    • External, independent persons to
    • provide objectivity
    Users of the results
    • Programme management and
    • implementers
    • Evaluators!
    • Programme management and
    • implementers
    • Policy makers
  • Types of evaluation PROJECT Time STARTING POINT DESIRED SITUATION Mid-Term Review (MTR) Appraisal (Ex-Ante Evaluation) Final Evaluation Ex-Post / Impact Evaluation Result Result Result Project Purpose Overall Objective
  • Evaluation Criteria (OECD/DAC) OVERALL OBJECTIVES MEANS ACTIVITIES RESULTS PROJECT PURPOSE EFFICIENCY IMPACT EFFECTIVENESS SUSTAINABILITY RELEVANCE PROBLEM
  • EVALUABILITY = sound project planning + systematic monitoring Project planning Project implementation MONITORING CHANGE Prog-ress report Prog-ress report Prog-ress report Final report Overall objectives + Indicators + Baseline Results + indicators + baseline activities inputs Project purpose + Indicators + Baseline Identi- fication report Incep- tion report Project docu- ment INCEP TION IDENTI FICATION FORMU LATION Ex-post evalu- ation Final evalu- ation Mid-term evalu- ation EVALUATION RELEVANCE IMPACT + other EFFECTIVENESS appropriate EFFICIENCY criteria SUSTAINABILITY Apprai-sal report APPRAISAL