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Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
Public Engagement and Education
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Public Engagement and Education

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  • 1. PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT AND EDUCATIONKIRSTY ANDERSON, PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT MANAGERGlobal CCS Institute Information Session15 March 2013
  • 2. Who am I? Expert support to projects Public Engagement Manager at the Global CCS Institute. School educationStatus Report and social research reports/ webinars etc.
  • 3. What are we here to discuss? Lessons learned and emerging best practice in public engagement and communication for CCS projects Discussion: how do these lessons apply in the Japanese context? Introducing CarbonKids A CarbonKids Challenge! Further resources
  • 4. Does communication and engagement matter? “ ...a fundamental conclusion is that communication should not be seen as an add- on to the project. Successful projects integrate communication and outreach as a critical component of the project from the beginning.” International Researcher Team: Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Australia; Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Netherlands; Illinois State Geological Survey, University of Illinois, USA; Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy, USA; and AJW Inc., USA. LEFT: Opposition group posters against the Barendrecht Project - Holland“Despite our positive stakeholder engagement,public opposition still ranked in the top 5 of ourproject risks” Longannet Project - UK Linlithgow Academy Pupil’s Science Communication posters - reflecting community support and understanding of CCS.
  • 5. Where does this learning and best practice come from?  CSIRO led global social research program  IEAGHG Social Research Network  CCS projects  International workshops and meetings  Peer-reviewed and internationally trialled toolkits  40+ social research and project knowledge products available to download now...
  • 6. So what does the research tell us? Common success factors The importance of completing a ‘Social Site Characterisation’ Five steps to create a successful stakeholder strategy: o Identify your stakeholders o Understand your stakeholders o Get your messages right o Get your messengers right o Set your communication/engagement activities as a fundamental part of project activity
  • 7. Five step stakeholder strategy Identify your stakeholders Understand your stakeholders Get your messages right Get your messengers right S et your communication/ engagement activities as a fundamental part of project activity
  • 8. Common success factors Alignment and shared vision across key government bodies SHARED VISION (national, state, local) and development teams. CORE Communication/outreach experts imbedded in project team from projectCOMMUNICATIONS outset. FUNCTION SOCIAL CONTEXT Social context genuinely considered during project site selection and CONSIDERED throughout the project’s design and implementation phases. EARLY Time and effort invested at the outset of a project to interact with and truly ENGAGEMENT understand stakeholders.TARGETED FRAMING Carefully considered and targeted messaging or framing of the project. AND MESSAGINGFLEXIBLE PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION Having the ability to adapt solutions to meet stakeholder concerns STRATEGY EDUCATE AND Overcoming the lack of understanding around CCS with education and theCREATE TANGIABLE lack of iconic imagery with real experiences – site visits, meeting teams, EXPERIENCES pilot sites, rock samples.
  • 9. Common success factors Alignment and shared vision across key government bodies SHARED VISION (national, state, local) and development teams. CORE Communication/outreach experts imbedded in project team from projectCOMMUNICATIONS outset. FUNCTION SOCIAL CONTEXT Social context genuinely considered during project site selection and CONSIDERED throughout the project’s design and implementation phases. The common root of all these success EARLY Time and effort invested at the outset of a project to interact with and truly ENGAGEMENT & understand stakeholders. factors is the practice of building trust. EDUCATIONTARGETED FRAMING Carefully considered and targeted messaging or framing of the project. AND MESSAGINGFLEXIBLE PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION Having the ability to adapt solutions to meet stakeholder concerns STRATEGYCREATE TANGIABLE Overcoming the lack of iconic imagery for CCS with real experiences – site EXPERIENCES visits, meeting teams, pilot sites, rock samples.
  • 10. Social site characterisation “Social site characterisation draws its reference from the critical role of geological site characterisation for CCS projects, expanding the concept to suggest that in addition to assessing the technical and/or physical characteristics of a site, the social (or human) characteristics should also be considered when selecting and designing projects.” Wade, S., Greenberg, S., Social Site Characterisation: From Concept to Application, 2011 What do you want to know? What is going on locally? Where does the project fit? How will the project/ project team be Key themes for discussion perceived by stakeholders? Local economic conditions Local empowerment Underlying views EnvironmentTo be useful, social site information must be truly integrated into project planning
  • 11. Identify your stakeholders“STAKEHOLDERS...those who have an interest in a particular decision,either as individuals or representatives of a group. This includes peoplewho influence a decision, or can influence it, as well as those affected by it.” Hemmati, 2002  Large and varied range of stakeholders  Brainstorm and categorise stakeholders as a project team  Consider including trusted external stakeholders in identification process  Lists of key stakeholders will evolve and grow over time Example of diverse range of possible stakeholder groups that may impact a CCS project – adapted from Hund, et al.
  • 12. Understand your stakeholders“It is important to recognise that a project’s stakeholder list will change andgrow as the project progresses. It is essential to continually analyse inputand information to identify additional stakeholders who should be engaged.”Tenaska Trailblazer, Texas (Tenaska 2010, p6). Iterative and ongoing Tools Resource Links process Social Data Collection www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/social-site- Multiple methods of and Baseline characterisation-concept-application/online/35391 Surveys gathering www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/social-site- stakeholder Brainstorming characterisation-concept-application/online/35396 information, including tools that support Interviews and www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/social-site- Focus Groups characterisation-concept-application/online/35406 early stakeholder engagement Stakeholder www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/social-site- Mapping characterisation-concept-application/online/35411 Social data interpretation and www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/communic SWOT Analysis ation-and-engagement-toolkit-ccs- SWOT analysis projects/online/32166
  • 13. Get the message right“The people who endorsed us talked about it (CCS) being a vital tool inthe battle against climate change. I don’t think that that kind of argumentworked at a local level, within the local community, they didn’t care. Wewould bring it up and they would say ‘oh that’s nice for us’” Norm Sacuta, Director of Communication, IEA GHG Weyburn, Canada  Frame messaging to suit stakeholders  Local benefits  Keep it simple and visual  Independent Steering GroupNew Global CCS Institute graphics now available to download from:http://www.globalccsinstitute.com/understanding-ccs/information-resources
  • 14. Get the messengers right “It is critically important to understanding where people get their information from... messages from multiple sources with potentially varying perspectives may carry more weight... ensuring that stakeholders have access to technical experts, not just project proponents, to answer questions is important for building trust.” Illinois State Geological Survey, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: FutureGen Case Study, 2010  Sources of information – Third party advocacy – Community Liaison Officer/Community Liaison Group – Project Spokespeople  Methods of communicatingThe Benefit, Assurance and Truthfulness Dynamic, Prangnell M, Communications for Carbon Capture andStorage – identifying the benefits, managing risk and maintaining the trust of stakeholders, 2013, Pg 3
  • 15. Set communication and engagement as fundamentalproject activities“A fundamental conclusion is that communication should not be seen asan add-on to the project. Successful projects integrate communicationand outreach as a critical component of the project from the beginning.” Wade, S., Greenberg, S., Social Site Characterisation: From Concept to Application, 2011  Develop a clear consultation plan and communicate this through multiple sources A Stakeholder Management and communication function  Provide an open channel for should always be integrated communication with the into project management ... project Ultimately Stakeholder Management is instrumental  Establish fixed checkpoints in creating necessary conditions for other project with stakeholders and pre- functions. brief before announcements Stakeholder Management Report, ROAD, 2011
  • 16. DISCUSSION: public engagement in a Japanese context What public engagement / communication challenges have you experienced in Japan? Is CCS widely understood here? Who are considered key CCS stakeholders and opinion formers in Japan?
  • 17. CCS education  2011 global review - lack of publically available CCS education resources  2012 Institute launch “Introduction to Carbon Capture and Storage” produced in partnership with CSIRO  Resource reviewed by science and education experts and trialled in classrooms in Australia and internationally.  CCS resource integrated into CSIRO’s national sustainability education program - CarbonKids
  • 18. CCS education  Partnership with CSIRO and 255 Australian schools  Teaching notes and primary and high school resources free to download  School workshops and teacher development sessions  Hands on science kit and games  Challenge events  Fully evaluated program  International pilot program  Low Carbon Energy resource coming soon!
  • 19. CarbonKids Challenge!!
  • 20. Your CarbonKids Challenge...Be the first adults to trial the latest CarbonKids games!
  • 21. Further resources Key reports/ resources links Further research links Contact details
  • 22. Communication/Engagement Toolkit for CCS projects  PDF, e-book, online version  Globally trialled and peer reviewed practical guide for CCS developers  Contains tools, activities and work sheets  Can be used in conjunction with:CSIRO: Peta Ashworth , Judith Bradbury, C.F.J. (Ynke) Feenstra, SallieGreenberg, Gretchen Hund, Thomas Mikunda, Sarah Wade and Hylton Social Site CharacterisationShaw, Mar 2011www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/communication-and- Toolkitengagement-toolkit-ccs-projects Communicating the Risks of CCS
  • 23. Social Site Characterisation  PDF, e-book, online version  Social science literature review  Practical activities, tools and resources to improve understanding of a projects local community.  Can be used in conjunction with the:CSIRO: Sarah Wade (AJW Inc, USA) and Sallie Greenberg (USA), Communications andJune 2011 Engagement Toolkit forwww.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/social-site-characterisation-concept-application CCS Projects
  • 24. Communicating the risks of CCS  PDF  Risk communication research and best practice review  Lessons learned from five North American CCS case studies  Five-step strategy for understanding community views of projects and developing riskWade LLC: Judith Bradbury (US), Sallie Greenberg (US), Sarah Wade, communication programs.(US), June 2011www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/communicating-risks-ccs  Links to further risk communication resources  Can be used in conjunction with the Communications and Engagement Toolkit
  • 25. Communication, project planning and management forCCS projects: an international comparison  PDF  Summary lessons from a series of case study reports from CSIRO led international research team  Should be read in conjunction with case studies: – Barendrecht Project – The Netherlands – Carson Project – United States of AmericaCSIRO: Peta Ashworth , Judith Bradbury, C.F.J. (Ynke) Feenstra, – Future Gen Project – UnitedSallie Greenberg, Gretchen Hund, Thomas Mikunda and Sarah Wade, States of AmericaNov 2010www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/communication-project- – Zero Gen Project – Australiaplanning-and-management-carbon-capture-and-storage-projects- – CO2CRC Otway Project –inter Australia
  • 26. Development of a CCS communications framework in Japan  PDF  First report from the Japanese Knowledge Network  Review and assessment of existing communication efforts  Includes development of an ‘Argumentation model’ supporting CCS in Japan.JGC Corporation, August 2011http://cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/22582/deve  Second phase report will beloping-communications-framework-japan-final-report-ver2-km.pdf available soon.
  • 27. Communications for carbon capture and storage:Identifying the benefits, managing risk and maintaining the trust of stakeholders  PDF  Analysis of the communication and engagement activities of five recent CCS demonstration projects based on interviews with the communication and engagement staff from the following projects: – ROAD (Netherlands) – Compostilla (Spain) Global CCS Institute: Max Prangnell, Feb 2013 www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/communications- – Longannet (UK) carbon-capture-and-storage-identifying-benefits-managing-risk- and – Weyburn (Canada) – Jaeschwalde (Germany)
  • 28. Understanding how individuals perceive carbon dioxide  PDF  Investigation into public perception of CO2 in Japan, Australia, and the Netherlands.  Analysis of how these perceptions of CO2 relate to perceptions of CCS, and examines how improved information provision about theCSIRO: Kenshi Itaoka, Aya Saito, Mia Paukovic, Marjolein de Best-Waldhober,Anne-Maree Dowd, Talia Jeanneret, Peta Ashworth and Mallory James underlying properties andJune 2012 characteristics of CO2http://www.globalccsinstitute.com/publications/understanding-how-individuals-perceive-carbon-dioxide-implications-acceptance-carbon influences individual attitudes towards low-carbon energy options, particularly CCS.
  • 29. CCS school education resources  PDF, e-book, online version, video footage, blogs  Primary and High School level educational resources and teacher guides  Links to the Australian pilot of the educational resources through the CSIRO CarbonKids programThe Global CCS Institute , CSIRO, contributions from a number of Australian  Examples of student work andschools participating in the ‘CarbonKids’ Initiative. teacher testamonialshttp://www.globalccsinstitute.com/get-involved/in-focus/2012/08/carbonkids  Coming soon... International CCS Challenge events and resources for students interested in learning more on CCS and low carbon energy
  • 30. Factsheets, images and videos  The Global CCS Institute’s new suite of information and education resources to explain and illustrate carbon capture and storage in plain language.  Printable fact sheets, images, a link to education material and the Institute’s YouTube videos. The Global CCS Institute: http://www.globalccsinstitute.com/understanding-ccs/information- resources
  • 31. Other useful links...• World Resources Institute - Guidelines for Community Engagement in Carbon Dioxide Capture, Transport, and Storage Projects• www.wri.org/publication/ccs-and-community-engagement• ESTEEM: Engage Stakeholders through a Systematic Toolbox to Manage New Energy Projects• www.esteem-tool.eu/• National Energy Technology Laboratory, US DOE – Best Practices for Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects• www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/carbon_seq/refshelf/BPM_PublicOutreach.pdf• B. Fischhoff – Risk Perception and Communication Unplugged• www.soc.iastate.edu/sapp/Fischhoff.pdf• UK Government CCS FEED knowledge products• www.gov.uk/uk-carbon-capture-and-storage-government-funding-and- support#ccs-knowledge-sharing
  • 32. Contact detailsMany thanks for listening!For more information on any of the topic areas coveredtoday or for assistance in sourcing further research oreducational material, please contact me on the detailsbelow:Kirsty AndersonPublic Engagement Manager – Projects, Financial and CommercialEmail: kirsty.anderson@globalccsinstitute.comP +61 (0)2 6175 5338M +61 (0)417 273 663

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