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Pittsburgh presentation 13-16 May 2013

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On 13-16 May, the Global CCS Institute hosted an Americas Members’ Meeting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in conjunction with the 12th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture Utilisation and Sequestration.

On 13-16 May, the Global CCS Institute hosted an Americas Members’ Meeting in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in conjunction with the 12th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture Utilisation and Sequestration.

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance

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  • 1. Brad Page – CEOTwelfth Annual CCUS Conference, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania14 May 2013What is being done, what isn’t, and what must be done to meet carbonreduction goals given current energy needs and economic reality
  • 2. Economic growth – IEA 2°C scenario2Source: International Energy Agency 2012
  • 3. Economic growth – IEA 2°C scenario3Source: International Energy Agency 2012
  • 4. Energy growth: drivers outside the OECD countriesSource: International Energy Agency 2012 4
  • 5. Potential emissions by current fossil fuel reservesSource: International Energy Agency 2012 5
  • 6. Potential emissions by current fossil fuel reservesSource: International Energy Agency 2012 6
  • 7. CCS and power – the role of the AmericasSource: International Energy Agency 20127
  • 8. Challenges to deployment: Costs8
  • 9. Challenges to deployment: Revenue9
  • 10. Challenges to deployment: limited carbon constraints10Source: Energy Information Agency
  • 11. But CCS benefits from CO2-EOR Enables CCS technology improvement and cost reduction. Improves business case for demonstration and earlymover projects through CO2 revenue. Helps gain public and policymaker acceptance. Builds and sustains a skilled CCS workforce. Supports CO2 transportation network development whereEOR is an option. Improves prospects for worldwide deployment.11
  • 12. CO2-EOR challenges CO2-EOR as CCUS although important as an enabler forCCS, it is geographically and capacity limited in thelong run. North America is fortunate to have theopportunity. CO2 revenue currently alone will not bridge gap for highcapture cost scenarios; more needs to be done to narrowthe gap (technology, policy, market). Gaps exists between geologic storage permitting andCO2-EOR regimes (Class 2 vs Class 6 in the US). Low Natural Gas prices in North America driving shift togas from coal, but eventually will need CCS on gas tomeet global emissions reduction targets.12
  • 13. CCS policy and funding support13
  • 14. Source:Gallagher, K.S. and L.D. Anadon, DOE Budget Authority for Energy Research, Development,and Demonstration DatabaseNth American reality / leadership / project successes14
  • 15. North America large-scale integrated projects by asset lifecycle and yearSteady progress15
  • 16. North America large-scale integrated projects by asset lifecycle and yearSteady progress16
  • 17.  Emissions from various fossil fuel-driven industries andenergy consumption are high. Countries with a particular interest – and participating incapacity development activities – include:- Mexico – investigating CCS as part of its energy and climatechange strategies- Trinidad and Tobago – looking at CCS legal and regulatoryissues- Brazil – publishing a geological storage atlas.Importance of Central and South America17
  • 18. What needs to be done Fuel switching and EOR not enough to meet targets. Climate change legislation not progressing sufficiently. Use of existing regulations may not be optimum toencourage CCS/CCUS. Need to include CCS in the portfolio of clean technologieswith equitable incentives and treatment - lowering cost ofmeeting reduction targets in the long run. Funding for CCS demonstration projects should beaccelerated and incentives increased from current base. Encourage CCS capacity building in developingeconomies. Opportunities emerging in Central and South America.18

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