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Developing messages to communicate CCS to the general public:    a knowledge sharing exercise in Japan The Global CCS Inst...
Background <ul><li>Many organisations in the energy and environmental sectors recognise that anthropogenic global warming ...
Stakeholder needs: global warming <ul><li>Urgency is especially difficult to explain - why rush to solve a problem that ha...
Information and communications: CCS <ul><li>How can the need for CCS and its overall benefits be communicated in a transpa...
Knowledge sharing <ul><li>Communication of information in form consistent with stakeholders’ interests and literacy </li><...
Problem definition <ul><li>Although the idea of knowledge sharing seems obvious, it has proven difficult to implement in p...
The Knowledge-sharing test bed  <ul><li>In order to move forward, a project to examine application of such KM tools for CC...
The Knowledge-sharing test bed  <ul><li>In order to move forward, a project to examine application of such KM tools for CC...
Steps for improving understanding on CCS (1/2) Illustrate impacts of global warming on everyday life Explain the need  to ...
Steps for improving understanding on CCS (2/2)
Communication case-base  <ul><li>The database contains... </li></ul>
Argumentation model for CCS (1/3)  Carbon dioxide  capture and storage (CCS) is an effective technique for reducing the ri...
Argumentation model for CCS (2/3)  C. What are the benefits of CCS?   C.1 By combining CCS with other measures, a large re...
Argumentation model for CCS (3/3)  C.4 By incorporating CCS as one of the global warming measures, global warming can be r...
Changing focus in full argumentation model
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Hiroyasu Takase - CCS Public Engagement - Presentation at the Global CCS Institute Members’ Meeting: 2011

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Transcript of "Hiroyasu Takase - CCS Public Engagement - Presentation at the Global CCS Institute Members’ Meeting: 2011"

  1. 1. Developing messages to communicate CCS to the general public: a knowledge sharing exercise in Japan The Global CCS Institute Melbourne Members’ Meeting 4 th October, 2011 Hiroyasu Takase (Quintessa Japan) Hidemitsu Shimada (JGC Corporation) Satoshi Someya (AIST) Ian McKinley (McKinley Consulting)
  2. 2. Background <ul><li>Many organisations in the energy and environmental sectors recognise that anthropogenic global warming is a major hazard which, if unchecked, could lead to catastrophic consequences </li></ul><ul><li>To combat such warming, it is essential that releases of greenhouse gases are reduced </li></ul><ul><li>CCS could play an important role, but this option is poorly understood by the general public </li></ul><ul><li>To move forward, it is important to educate all key stakeholder groups on the issues involved and develop dialogue </li></ul>
  3. 3. Stakeholder needs: global warming <ul><li>Urgency is especially difficult to explain - why rush to solve a problem that has been building up since the industrial revolution? </li></ul><ul><li>Clear acknowledgement that there is no single solution: a combination of increased energy efficiency, low carbon power sources, CCS and geo-engineering may be required </li></ul><ul><li>Concept of a “tipping point” needs to be communicated to explain urgency </li></ul><ul><li>After March 11 tsunami and nuclear accidents, balancing short-term and long-term requirements should be emphasized in Japan </li></ul>
  4. 4. Information and communications: CCS <ul><li>How can the need for CCS and its overall benefits be communicated in a transparent manner? </li></ul><ul><li>User-friendly illustration of the spectrum of CCS options available, their pros and cons for different boundary conditions and their benefits (both in absolute terms and compared to other options for climate change mitigation) </li></ul><ul><li>Is this enough? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Knowledge sharing <ul><li>Communication of information in form consistent with stakeholders’ interests and literacy </li></ul><ul><li>Process of confidence building for stakeholders to buy into important decisions affecting their future </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dialogue and interaction with experts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blending face-to-face meetings/visits and continuous on-line learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunities for stakeholders’ voluntary deliberation, e.g., technology assessment, public comments on the policies relating to CCS, developing proposals to government , games (“stabilization wedges” for example) </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Problem definition <ul><li>Although the idea of knowledge sharing seems obvious, it has proven difficult to implement in practice due to the problems of: </li></ul><ul><li>Communication within complex, multidisciplinary fields and across national, linguistic and cultural borders </li></ul><ul><li>Identification and motivation of knowledge suppliers, especially when commercial and IP interests are involved </li></ul><ul><li>Involvement of all key stakeholders and encouragement of their active participation in decision-making (“buy-in”) </li></ul><ul><li>Synthesis and quality assurance of an exponentially growing knowledge base and facilitating access by all involved parties </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Knowledge-sharing test bed <ul><li>In order to move forward, a project to examine application of such KM tools for CCS knowledge sharing has been initiated, which involved: </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing a community of key staff from interested organisations </li></ul><ul><li>In an initial workshop (November 2010), a test exercise was defined which focuses on promotion of understanding of CCS by non-expert stakeholders </li></ul><ul><li>Output of the initial phase of work, lessons learned and proposals for further work as summarised in the following </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Knowledge-sharing test bed <ul><li>In order to move forward, a project to examine application of such KM tools for CCS knowledge sharing has been initiated </li></ul><ul><li>Summary of output </li></ul><ul><li>Establishing a community of key staff from interested organisations, procedures for facilitating knowledge sharing and required communication tools, i.e., the GCCSI digital platform </li></ul><ul><li>Specification of (possibly Japan-specific) requirements for promotion of CCS understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Compilation of a knowledge base of past communication efforts and an assessment of their effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Development of an action plan for improving CCS understanding and stakeholder participation in national dialogue </li></ul><ul><li>Development of an “Argumentation model” supporting CCS in Japan </li></ul>
  9. 9. Steps for improving understanding on CCS (1/2) Illustrate impacts of global warming on everyday life Explain the need to mitigate global warming Explain both strengths and weaknesses of CCS Explain CCS as a measure for mitigating global warming Explain both strengths and weaknesses of such measures Explain other measures against global warming Provide basis for decisions concerning implementation of CCS Illustrate the need of fossil fuels for the time being
  10. 10. Steps for improving understanding on CCS (2/2)
  11. 11. Communication case-base <ul><li>The database contains... </li></ul>
  12. 12. Argumentation model for CCS (1/3) Carbon dioxide  capture and storage (CCS) is an effective technique for reducing the risk of global warming. A. Why do we need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions to prevent global warming? B. What kind of technology is involved in CCS? C. What are the benefits of CCS? D. Are there any hurdles in the implementation of CCS or problems that may arise during implementation? E. What other measures can reduce global warming?
  13. 13. Argumentation model for CCS (2/3) C. What are the benefits of CCS? C.1 By combining CCS with other measures, a large reduction in carbon emissions can be achieved, which will mitigate global warming C.2 When implementing CCS, carbon dioxide emissions will be reduced while simultaneously continuing to use fossil fuels, so CCS can contribute to a stable energy supply as well as effective use of resources available C.3 Because CCS is a technology compatible with current industry structures and infrastructure, changes in lifestyle due to its adoption are minor and can be implemented carefully and slowly compared to other global warming adaptions or counter-measures C.4 By incorporating CCS as one of the global warming measures, global warming can be reduced at less cost than measures without CCS C.5  The combination of CCS and the use of biomass energy can result in a net reduction in carbon dioxide levels, not only to suppress the increase in CO2 concentration   
  14. 14. Argumentation model for CCS (3/3) C.4 By incorporating CCS as one of the global warming measures, global warming can be reduced at less cost than measures without CCS C.4.1 One of the characteristics of CCS when compared with other global warming measures, is that it can be combined with infrastructure relating to current energy sources, so the existing facilities and equipment can be reused.  This is one of the factors that contributes to the price competitiveness of CCS  C.4.2 In the model for future energy use and economic activity on a global scale, by incorporating CCS as part of the global warming counter-measures, the cost is reduced by around 30% when compared to alternative nuclear power and renewable energy options C.4.2.1 Existing industries in Japan do not have much commonality with CCS, so can the cost reduction due to the incorporation of CCS be expected here?  C.4.2.1.1 Marginal costs of carbon emissions modelled for Japan (cost needed to reduce the emissions by 1 ton) have been calculated for cases with and without CCS. As a result, the cost when reducing emissions without CCS, is predicted to increase significantly after 2030 until 2050     C.4.2.2 The predictive model has great uncertainties, is there a possibility that CCS may not be able to reduce costs as modelled?  External link
  15. 15. Changing focus in full argumentation model
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