CCS Development and Prospects in Indonesia - Sugihardjo

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This presentation was given as part of the CCS Ready workshop which was held in association with the 6th Asia Clean Energy Forum (20 – 24 June, Manila)

The workshop discussed the range of measures and best practices that can be implemented to prompt the design, permitting and construction of CCS projects when designing or building a new fossil fuelled energy or industrial plant.

The workshop hosted participants of the Asian Development Banks’ Regional Technical Assistance Program who updated the group on the outcomes of their individual projects.

This presentation provides an update on the current project being undertaken under the Asian Development Bank’s Regional Technical Assistance Program which aims to conduct an analysis of the potential for CCS, culminating in a road map for a CCS demonstration project in Indonesia.

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CCS Development and Prospects in Indonesia - Sugihardjo

  1. 1. Carbon Capture and Storage:Prospect & Development in Indonesia R & D Centre for Oil and Gas Technology “LEMIGAS” Manila, 23 June 2011
  2. 2. Outline Background Indonesia’s Pathway in CCS Prospect of CCS Deployment CCS Development in Indonesia Main Issues and Challenges on CCS Deployment in Indonesia Basin Assessment and CO2 Storage Capacity Estimation in Depleted Reservoirs Selected Area for ADB Technical Assistance for CCS ConclusionsPage  2
  3. 3. Background • GOI’s non-binding commitment to reduce country emissions to 26% in 2020 • Current efforts are considered still insufficient to achieve CO2 emissions abatement target in 2020 • energy mix improvements • the switch to less-carbon intensive fuels • renewable resources deployment • It is imperative for Indonesia to  Energy mix improvement for 2025 is still investigate options for CCS dominated by fossil fuel  As a result of objective function of Energy mix improvement : The energy sector can achieve 950 Mt CO2 reduction in 2025 from 1150 Mt in BaUPage  3
  4. 4. Indonesia’s Pathway in CCS 1. Preliminary studies on CCS-EOR in East Kalimantan & South Sumatra (2003 – 2005) 2. Joint study on CCS potential with industries: • Sojitz & Mitsubishi (2005); Total Indonesie (2007); Shell (2008); and KIGAM (2010) • MoU with METI-Japan CCS (2010) 3. Became a founding member of Global CCS Institute (GCCSI) led by Australia (April 2009) 4. Joint Study with UK Government (November, 2009) 5. Other Cooperation: • IEA - CCS Roadmap and Establishing of National Regulatory FrameworkPage  4
  5. 5. CCS-EOR in East Kalimantan 1. 10 reservoirs are suitable for CO2-EOR 2. Screening Reservoirs from MMP • MMP > current reservoir pressure • 3 reservoirs above 0.8 psi/ft were eliminated (above pf) 3. Rule of Thumb Method: • Potential Oil Recoveries of 3.6 – 7.2 MMSTB • Sequestration volumes of 0.5 – 2.1 Million tons 4. The Results of Laboratory Study: • The result of CO2 injection at 3000 psig reveals that the recovery factor was 93.3% OOIP after 1.2 PV CO2 injected. 5. The Simulation Results: • Continues CO2 injection − Potential oil recoveries of 2.6 – 3.3 MMSTB − Sequestration volumes of 4.7 – 4.9 Million tons • 1 : 1 WAG − Potential oil recoveries of 2.4 MMSTBPage  5 − Sequestration volumes of 2.2 Million ton
  6. 6. Joint Study with UK Government  A first comprehensive study to identify CCS potential deployment in Indonesia  Title: Understanding Carbon Capture and Storage Potential In Indonesia  Study Objective: To develop an understanding of the requirements associated with deploying CCS in Indonesia by addressing technical, commercial and regulatory aspects of CCS deployment.  CCS Study Working Group: Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources (BALITBANG/LEMIGAS) , State Ministry of Environment, Shell, PLN, World Energy Council, and supported by UK Embassy in Jakarta  Status: Completed November 2009. Full report available at http://www.worldenergy.org/news__events/news/2746.aspPage  6
  7. 7. Possible CCS Scheme in Indonesia (Power Plants) Bangko Tengah Muara Jawa Steam Coal Power Plant Steam Coal Power Plant 4 x 600 MW 2 x 100 MW Emissions Projection up to Emissions Projection up to 2018: 11.5 MtCO2 2018: 10.6 MtCO2 60 km 60 km East Kalimantan Onshore South Sumatera U 15 km Onshore 129.7 km GU Jawa Sea Offshore U Subang Gas Processing Plant Emissions Projection up to 2018: 6.2 MtCO2 Legend: 320 km 300 km Power Plant 35 km Gas Processing Plant Muara Tawar 2,3,4 Indramayu Storage Location Combined Cycle Power Plant Steam Coal Power Plant 3 x 750 MW 2 x 1000 MW Pipeline Emissions Projection up to Emissions Projection up to Note: Unscaled Map 2018: 26.6 MtCO2 2018: 65.8 MtCO2Page  7
  8. 8. Existing CO2 Capture in Indonesia Full Capacity Gundih CO2 Production From Operational Capacity Bontang Area : + 30.000 T/D MerbauCilamaya Subang MMSCFD 0 50 100 150 200 Source: Modified from PERTAMINAOther PERTAMINA’S Planned CO2 Removal Plant East Natuna:  2.4 BCSFD CO2 Cepu:  72.5 MMSCFD CO2 Bontang LNG Plant:  30.000 tD CO2 Page  8 Page │ 8 LEMIGAS
  9. 9. CCS Development in Indonesia 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011.CO2 . Sequestration on Geological CO2 . . Sequestration Laboratory and Reservoir Worksheet . . Screening CO2 Sequestration Basin Merbau Field Assessment Demo Project and CO2 Proposal on Saline Storage Simulation Potential Storage Aquifer Study of Capacity CO2 Estimation in Injection in Depleted Depleted Reservoirs ReservoirPage  9
  10. 10. CCS Development in Indonesia ROADMAP of CCS R&D Year 2010-2014 Year NO Activity 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 I. CO2 EMISSION FROM ENERGY SECTOR 1.1 CO2 Emission from Energy Sector   1.2 Impact of Energy Effieciecy and Renewable Energy   II. CARBON TRADE 2.1 Carbon Trade Mechanism  2.2 CCS as CDM Activity  III. LEGAL AND REGULATORY FRAMEWORK ON CCS 3.1 Existing Legal and Regulatory Framework from Developed Countries  3.2 Establish National Regulatory Framework  IV. CCS Potential on Geological Formation 4.1 CO2 Emission Source   4.2 Capture and Transportation Technology    4.3 CO2 Storage on Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs    4.4 CO2 Stirage on Deep Saline Aquifers and Coalbed Methane  4.5 CCS Cost Unit  4.6 Risk Assessment Page  10
  11. 11. Prospect of CCS Deployment • New build Coal-fired power plants as a target from large point sources of CO2 emissions • The utilization of CO2 in petroleum industry particularly for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) • Enabling development of highly contaminated gas fields e.g. Natuna D alpha • In line with Government non-binding commitment to reduce country emissions to 26% in 2020.Page  11
  12. 12. Main Issues and Challenges on CCS Deployment • No public awareness of CCS and lack of technical capacity • CCS costs must be reduced • No Legal and Regulatory Frameworks • Need accelerating investment on R&D • Demonstration projects are needed in developing countries funded by international sourcesPage  12
  13. 13. Basin Assessment (Site Selection)Developing Screening Criteria for Specific Indonesian Sedimentary BasinsModified from Bachu, 2003 and CO2CRC, 2009 Increasing CO2 Storage Potential CRITERIA CLASSES 1 2 3 4 5On/Off Shore Deep Offshore Shallow Offshore Onshore Warm ColdGeothermal Moderate (>400C/km) (<300C/km)Maturity Unexploration Exploration Development Production Basin Extensive Moderately FaultedFault Intensity Faulted and Limited Faulting and fracturing and fracture fractureTectonic Setting For Arc Back Arc Platform Deltaic Rift Vally Shallow Intermediate DeepDepth (meter) (<1,500m) (1,500-3,500 m) (>3,500 m)Size Small Medium Large GiantHydrocarbon None Small Medium Large GiantPotential EasyAccessibility Inaccessible Difficult AcceptablePage  13 Page │ 13Infrastructure None Minor Moderate Extensive LEMIGAS
  14. 14. Storage Capacity Estimation in Depleted Oil and Gas Reservoirs Simplified Carbon Sequestration Key assumptions Leadership Forum (CSLF) Methodology The Volume previously occupied by, by MCO2  CO2r UR  Seff  B and large the produced hydrocarbons becomes available for CO2 storage Where: Reservoirs are not flooded (Secondary MCO2 = CO2 storage capacity of the aquifer & tertiary recovery) CO2r = CO2 Density at P & T Reservoir Reservoirs are not in hydrodynamic UR = Ultimate Recovery contact with an aquifer Seff = Storage Efficiency Factor Density was calculated using EOS B = Formation Volume Factor Span & Wagner Np/Ult ratio ≥ 55% Source: Bachu., et al, 2007 & Poulsen., et al. 2009 Page  14 Page │ 14 LEMIGAS
  15. 15. Selected Area for ADB Technical Assistance for CCSSouth SumateraSpecific Area for Demonstration Project Merbau Gas Field Merbau CO2 Removal Plant Rationale • Large presence of the industrial and power sector in South Sumatera Large potential and various CO2 sinks (depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs, and coal seams) • South Sumatera has low density population • Existing infrastructure • Stable geological formations from seismic and tectonic activity • South Sumatera sedimentary basin has high suitability for CO2 storagePage  15 Page │ 15 LEMIGAS
  16. 16. Identified Large Stationary CO2 Sources in South Sumatera Oil and Gas Industry Coal Mining Refinery Fertilizer Power Plant Cement Plant Plant Paper Plant Gas Processing PlantPage  16 Page │ 16 LEMIGAS
  17. 17. Methodology for Calculating CO2 Emissions 2006 IPCC Guidelines for National Greenhouse Gas Inventories 44 ■ Fuel Combustion: CO2  Q  EF  12 44 ■ Industry : CO2  Natural Gas  Carbon Content  12 Shell Guidance 2006 ■ Fuel Combustion : Carbon Mollar Mass 44 CO2  Fuel Used   Mollar Mass Carbon 12 API Compendium 2009 ■ Flare: 44 CO2  Fuel Used  WT %Cmixture  12Page  17 Page │ 17 LEMIGAS
  18. 18. Candidate Field for CO2 Storage: Merbau Field Owner : PERTAMINA Discovery : 1975 Delineation : 1980 Total Well : ~17 Wells Main Reservoir : Baturaja Formation (BRF) Res. Depth : (1650 – 2100) m TVD Aver Res. Thick : 70m Average Porosity : 11% (5 – 15)% Average Sw : 28% (10 – 35)% Average Pressure : (2750 – 2850) psi at 1800 m tvd Average Temperature : (260 – 270)0 F OGIP (BSCF) : 353.577 (Status 2005) RESERVE (BSCF) : 282.861 Current Production : 300 MMSCFDPage  18 Page │ 18 LEMIGAS
  19. 19. Conclusions • Deployment of CCS in Indonesia is aligned with national energy policy and GoI’s commitment to reduce 26% country emission. • This pre-feasibility analysis for a demonstration CCS project will culminate in the development of a roadmap for CCS demonstration. • CCS in conjunction with CO2-EOR will be the main highlight in this project • Other CCS key elements such as legal and regulatory framework and socio-economic will also be assessed.Page  19
  20. 20. Thank You Agency of R&D for Energy and Mineral Resources R & D C e n t r e f o r O i l a n d G a s Te c h n o l o g y Republic of Indonesia LEMIGAS upasarai@lemigas.esdm.go.id sugihardjo@lemigas.esdm.go.id utomo@lemigas.esdm.go.idPage  20
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