IV Delivery Methods

8,828 views
8,275 views

Published on

0 Comments
11 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
8,828
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
11
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Continuous – allows carefully regulated amount of fluid over a prolonged period.Intermittent – a solution (commonly a medication such as an antibiotic) given for shorter periods at set intervals. Direct – (sometimes called IV push) used to deliver single dose (bolus) of a drug.
  • Advantages
  • Disadvantages
  • Secondary line is usually connected or piggybacked into the primary line by way of a Y – site ( y – shaped section of tubing with a self – sealing access port)
  • Types of IV setsVented – plastic bags and some bottles.Other features & optionsIv administration sets comes with features as well, including ports for infusing secondary medications and filters for blocking microbes, irritants, or large particles. The tubing also varies. Some types are designed to enhance proper functioning of devices that help regulate the flow rate. Other tubing is used specifically for continuous or intermittent infusion or for infusing parenteral nutrition or blood.
  • Maintain precise IV flow rates, use an infusion control device
  • It resembles a roller clamp.Added to the IV tubing.Sets the rate minder to the desired flow rate, you adjust the clamp to deliver that rate.Be sure to label the infusion bag with the rate in milliliters per hour.
  • Some limitations. Don’t deliver infusions at rates lower than 5 – 10 ml/hrMainly for adult patients and noncritical infusions.
  • Assess flow rates more frequently in patients
  • IV Delivery Methods

    1. 1. IV DELIVERY METHODS<br />
    2. 2. IV routes<br />
    3. 3.
    4. 4.
    5. 5. Basic methods for delivering IV therapy<br />
    6. 6. Veins used in IV therapy<br />Internal jugular<br />External jugular<br />Superior vena cava<br />Left subclavian<br />Cephalic<br />Basilic<br />Median cubital<br />Median antebrachial<br />Accessory cephalic<br />Dorsal venous arch<br />Metacarpal <br />Digital <br />
    7. 7.
    8. 8. Veins used in IV therapy<br />
    9. 9.
    10. 10.
    11. 11.
    12. 12. Making the right choice!<br />
    13. 13. Continuous infusion<br />
    14. 14. Continuous infusion<br />
    15. 15. Intermittent infusion<br />
    16. 16.
    17. 17. Direct injection<br />
    18. 18. Administration sets<br />
    19. 19.
    20. 20.
    21. 21.
    22. 22. Infusion flow rates<br />Maintaining accurate flow rate for the solutions<br />Runs to fast or too slow<br />Volume – control devices & correct administration set <br />Familiar with all information in the doctor’s order<br />
    23. 23. Calculating flow rates<br />
    24. 24. Regulating flow rates<br />
    25. 25.
    26. 26.
    27. 27. IV clamps<br />
    28. 28. Pumps <br />Developed all the time<br />Be sure to attend instruction sessions to learn how to use them<br />Keep a file of instruction manual<br />
    29. 29.
    30. 30.
    31. 31. Patient – controlled analgesia pumps (PCA)<br />
    32. 32. Rate reminder<br />Added to the IV tubing.<br />Sets it to the desired flow rate, you adjust the clamp to deliver that rate.<br />Be sure to label the infusion bag with the rate in milliliters per hour.<br />
    33. 33. Rate reminder<br />Don’t deliver infusions at rates lower than 5 – 10 ml/hr<br />Adult patients and noncritical infusions<br />
    34. 34. Checking flow rates<br />
    35. 35. Documentation <br />
    36. 36. Forms <br />
    37. 37. Documentation of IV therapy<br />When therapy is initiated, label the dressing on the catheter insertion site & the fluid container according to facility policy & procedures & document…<br />Abbreviations<br />
    38. 38.
    39. 39.
    40. 40. Maintenance<br />
    41. 41. Discontinued <br />
    42. 42. Discontinued<br />
    43. 43. Patient teaching<br />
    44. 44.
    45. 45.
    46. 46. Thank you  <br />

    ×