Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Exploring Enlightenment: Text Mining the 18th-Century Republic of Letters
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Exploring Enlightenment: Text Mining the 18th-Century Republic of Letters

172
views

Published on

The challenge of ‘Big Data’ in the Humanities has led in recent years to a host of innovative technological and algorithmic approaches to the growing digital human record. These techniques—from data …

The challenge of ‘Big Data’ in the Humanities has led in recent years to a host of innovative technological and algorithmic approaches to the growing digital human record. These techniques—from data mining to distant reading—can offer students and scholars new perspectives on the exploration and visualisation of increasingly intractable data sets in the human and social sciences; perspectives that would have previously been unimaginable. The danger, however, in these kinds of ‘macro-analyses’, is that scholars find themselves increasingly disconnected from the raw materials of their research, engaging with massive collections of texts in ways that are neither intuitive nor transparent, and that provide few opportunities to apply traditional modes of close reading to these new resources. In this talk, I will outline some of my previous work using data mining and machine learning techniques to explore large data sets drawn primarily from the French Enlightenment period. Building upon these past experiences, I will then present my current research project at Oxford, which uses sequence alignment algorithms to identify intertextual relationships between authors and texts in the 18th-century “Republic of Letters.” By reintroducing the notion of (inter)textuality into algorithmic and data-driven methods of macro-anlalysis we can perhaps bridge the gap between distant and close readings, by way of an intermediary mode of scholarship I term ‘directed’ or ‘scalable’ reading.


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
172
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Visualizing the 19th-century Literary Genome – Matt Jockers,
  • A visualization of the Dutch Republic of Letters using Sci2 & Gephi from ScottWeingart “The Networked Structure of Scientific Growth” -- network analysis from sociology and statistical physics, modeling, human dynamics, and complexity theory.
  • Network Graph of all philosophy articles on Wikipedia, plotted by their “influenced by” sections… Simon Raper, Mindshare UK
  • Geographic Information Systems – fancy word for a map (or rather for a map to which data is associated).
  • Voltaire’s network of correspondence, 1710 to 1778.
  • Letter from Voltaire to Alexander Pope, 1726 --
  • Rousseau’s network of correspondence, 1710 to 1778.
  • Comparison of the two networks of correspondence, 1710 to 1778.
  • Robert DarntonAn Early Information Society: Figure 3: A schematic model of a communication circuit. From Robert Darnton, The Forbidden Best-Sellers of Pre-Revolutionary France (New York, 1995), 189.
  • Manifesto of the Physiocrats -- Quesnay
  • Classes of knowledge are represented graphically in the SystemeFiguré; traditional representation according to the faculties Memory, Reason, Imagination (looks back to Bacon).
  • Classes of knowledge are represented graphically in the SystemeFiguré; traditional representation according to the faculties Memory, Reason, Imagination (looks back to Bacon).
  • Classes of knowledge are represented graphically in the SystemeFiguré; traditional representation according to the faculties Memory, Reason, Imagination (looks back to Bacon).
  • We graphed the clustering of classes using machine learning techniques – basically using the vocabularies of each class to measure the strength of relationship between the classes based on such things word frequencies and lexical similarity measures... What we end up with is a birds-eye view of the relationship of the classes in the Encyclopedie that is much more forward-looking than the Systemefiguré (based on Bacon), and has much in common with the 19th-century development of the disciplines. That is to say that the classes tend to cluster together in groups that are nearer to a modern understanding of the disciplines
  • At the top we have the humanities and social sciences – Geography, History, Literature, Grammar, Religion, etc.
  • In the middle we have the Physical Sciences – Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, etc.
  • At the bottom (with some overlap as might be expected) we have the Biological sciences and Natural History... Move here from the question of order
  • Juvénal, Satires, ii.63: 'La censure estindulgente aux corbeaux, elles'acharnecontre les colombes.’ Our censor absolves the raven and passes judgment on the pigeon.
  • Horace, Odes, 1.vii.27: 'Il n'y a pas àdésespérer, tantqueTeucer sera votre chef, tantqueTeucer sera votre guide.'’ Never despair, while Teucer is with you, your guide, your augur.
  • Horace, Odes, 1.vii.27: 'Il n'y a pas àdésespérer, tantqueTeucer sera votre chef, tantqueTeucer sera votre guide.'’ Never despair, while Teucer is with you, your guide, your augur.
  • Magismagnosclericos non suntmagismagnossapientes.[“The greatest clerks are not the wisest men.” A proverb given in Rabelais’ Gargantua, i. 39.]
  • Magismagnosclericos non suntmagismagnossapientes.[“The greatest clerks are not the wisest men.” A proverb given in Rabelais’ Gargantua, i. 39.]
  • Earthquake in Lisbon, November 1 1755
  • Lisbon Earthquake Saturday, 1 November 1755
  • Lisbon Earthquake Saturday, 1 November 1755
  • Lisbon Earthquake Saturday, 1 November 1755
  • Digital books can have far more fixity than their material counterparts – this is in fact a reversal of the dichotomy between print materiality and digital immateriality set up by Chartier… we need to remind students that a book’s history isn’t monolithic, that a plurality of other editions have gone into making the online version.
  • Digital books can have far more fixity than their material counterparts – this is in fact a reversal of the dichotomy between print materiality and digital immateriality set up by Chartier… we need to remind students that a book’s history isn’t monolithic, that a plurality of other editions have gone into making the online version.
  • Each text is a new web of bygone citations…
  • Each text is a new web of bygone citations…
  • Each text is a new web of bygone citations…
  • Each text is a new web of bygone citations…
  • Transcript

    • 1. Exploring Enlightenment:Text Mining the 18th-CenturyRepublic of LettersGlenn RoeMellon Fellow in Digital HumanitiesUniversity of Oxford@glennhroe
    • 2. Why Text Mining?
    • 3. Why Text Mining?The Humanities discovers data (DH 1.0  DH 2.0)Quickly leads to a ‚data deluge‛ (ars longa, vita brevis)Big Data approaches to Humanities collectionsAre these appropriate for Humanities research?Is Literature data?
    • 4. Why Text Mining?Can tools/techniques developped in the Information andComputer Sciences be applied to literary data?(And should they be?)Future Digital Humanities researchers should work moreclosely with computer scientists.We won‘t necessarily write the algorithms that ‚mine‛ ourdata, but we can work to understand and critique them.Shed light on ‚black box‛ algorithms/tools.
    • 5. Big Data and the HumanitiesHow Big is Big?• The Complete Works of Voltaire (Voltaire Foundation):1,077 individual works, 6.7 million words• The Digital Encyclopédie of Diderot and d’Alembert (University ofChicago):28 volumes in folio; 74,00 articles; 21.7 million words• Electronic Enlightenment (University of Oxford):56,000 letters, 23 million words• ECCO-TCP (Oxford Text Archive):2,300 volumes, 75 million words• ARTFL-Frantext (University of Chicago):3,500 volumes, 215 million words• Early English Books Online EEBO (Northwestern University):23,000 volumes, ~1 billion words
    • 6. The challenge of a million books?There are only about 30,000 days in a human life -- at a book a day, itwould take 30 lifetimes to read a million books and our research librariescontain more than ten times that number. Only machines can read throughthe 400,000 books already publicly available for free download from theOpen Content Alliance.- Gregory Crane, ‚What do you do with a million books?‛D-Lib Magazine, March 2006
    • 7. And 5 million books?We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books everprinted. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trendsquantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of ‚culturomics‛ focusing on linguisticand cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields asdiverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, theadoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historicalepidemiology. ‚Culturomics‛ extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitativeinquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and thehumanities.www.sciencexpress.org / 16 December 2010
    • 8. Culturomics<
    • 9. Reading from afar< (or not at all).Distant reading: where distance, let me repeat it,is a condition of knowledge: it allows you tofocus on units that are much smaller or muchlarger than the text: devices, themes, tropes—orgenres and systems. And if, between the verysmall and the very large, the text itselfdisappears, well, it is one of those cases whenone can justifiably say, less is more. If we want tounderstand the system in its entirety, we mustaccept losing something. We always pay a pricefor theoretical knowledge: reality is infinitelyrich; concepts are abstract, are poor. But it’sprecisely this ‘poverty’ that makes it possible tohandle them, and therefore to know. This is whyless is actually more.Franco Moretti, ‚Conjectures on WorldLiterature‛ (2000)http://www.newleftreview.org/A2094
    • 10. Reading from afar< (or not at all).Matt Jockers,University ofNebraska-LincolnMacroanalysis:Digital Methods andLiterary History(UIUC Press, 2013)
    • 11. Matt Jockers, Macroanalysis (2013).
    • 12. Simon Raper, ‚Graphing the history of philosohy‛
    • 13. ‚Not Reading‛ has a long history.l’Histoire du livre• Dépot légal• After death inventories• Library holdings/circulation records• Archives of publishers• Vocabulary of titles (Furet)• Censorship records• <Martin, Furet, Darnton, Chartier, etc<
    • 14. François Quesnay,Tableau Œconomique, 1759.
    • 15. From Not Reading to Text MiningBy ‚not reading‛ we examine:concordances,frequency tables,feature lists,classification accuracies,collocation tables,statistical models, etc<We track:Literary topoi (E.R. Curtius), concepts (R. Koselleck,Begriffsgeschichte), épistémès (M. Foucault) and other semanticpatterns: over time, between categories, across genres.So that distant reading and text mining can provide larger contextsfor close reading(s) and traditional scholarship.
    • 16. Text Mining as Pattern DetectionData/Text Mining to:Detect suggestive or meaningful patterns in large datasets.Data mining is the extraction of implicit, previously unknown, and potentially usefulinformation from data. The idea is to build computer programs that sift throughdatabases automatically, seeking regularities or patterns. Strong patterns, if found, willlikely generalize to make accurate predictions on future data. Of course, there will beproblems. Many patterns will be banal and uninteresting. Others will be spurious,contingent on accidental coincidences in the particular dataset used. And real data isimperfect: some parts are garbled, some missing. Anything that is discovered will beinexact: there will be exceptions to every rule and cases not covered by any rule.Algorithms need to be robust enough to cope with imperfect data and to extractregularities that are inexact but useful.- Ian Witten, Data Mining: Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques, xvix.
    • 17. Three types of text mining*Distinction is mine (arbitrary) and does not cover all text mining tasks.1. Predictive Classification: learn categories from labeled data, predicton unknown instances.2. Comparative Classification: learn categories from labeled data to findaccuracy rate, errors, and most important features.3. Similarity: measure document/part similarities, looking formeaningful connections.
    • 18. Predictive ClassificationWidely used: spam filters, recommendation systems, etc.Computer ‚reads‛ text, identifies the words (features) most associated witheach class (author, class of knowledge).Humanities applications: extract classes or labels from contemporarydocuments.Use contemporary classification system rather than modern system topredict classes.*Problem: information space can be noisy, incoherent.
    • 19. Predictive ClassificationText Mining the Digital Encyclopédie74,131 articles in the current database13,272 articles without classification (18%)We trained our classifiers on the 60K classified articles (comprised of 2,899individual classes) to generate a model which is then used to classifythe unknown instances, and then reclassify all 74K articles.The resulting ‚ontology‛ was optimized to 360 classes – this is a typicalresult of machine classification.
    • 20. Predictive ClassificationClassifying the unclassified:• DISCOURS PRELIMINAIRE DES EDITEURS, Class=Philosophy• DEMI-PARABOLE, Class=Algebra• Bois de chauffage, Class=Commerce• Canard, Class=Natural history; Ornithology• Chartre de Champagne, Class=Jurisprudence• Chartre de commune, Class=Jurisprudence• Chartre aux Normands, Class=Jurisprudence• Chartre au roi Philippe, Class=Ecclesiastical historyChartre au roi Philippe fut donnée par Philippe Auguste vers la fin de lan 1208, ou au commencement delan 1209, pour régler les formalités nouvelles que lon devoit observer en Normandie dans lescontestations qui survenoient pour raison des patronnages déglise, entre des patrons laiques & despatrons ecclésiastiques. Cette chartre se trouve employée dans lancien coûtumier de Normandie, après letitre de patronnage déglise; & lorsquon relut en 1585 le cahier de la nouvelle coûtume, il fut ordonné qu àla fin de ce cahier lon inséreroit la chartre au roi Philippe & la chartre Normande. Quelques - uns ont attribuéla premiere de ces deux chartres à Philippe III. dit le Hardi; mais elle est de Philippe Auguste, ainsi que laprouvé M. de Lauriere au I. volume des ordonnances de la troisieme race, page 26. Voyez aussi à ce sujet le recueild arrêts de M. Froland, partie I. chap. vij.
    • 21. Comparative Classification‚Comparative Categorical Feature Analysis‛Use classifiers as a form of hypothesis testing.Train a classifier on a set of categories (gender of author, class ofknowledge).Run the trained model on the same data to find:• Accuracy of classification• Most salient features• Errors or Mis-classified instances*Classification errors can be rich sources of inquiry for humanists.
    • 22. Comparative ClassificationText Mining the Digital EncyclopédieOriginal # of classes: 2,899 - New # of classes: 36073.3% of articles were assigned to their original class, a number that isamazing given the complexity of the ontology.Which means that 26.7% of articles have a different class?This also means that of the 74,131 articles:44,628 classified correctly16,231 classified ‚incorrectly‛13,272 unclassified were classified
    • 23. Comparative ClassificationAccrues: original classification too specificTepidarium: reclassification seems more logicalAchées: incorrect prediction although appropriate given vocabularyText Mining the Digital Encyclopédie
    • 24. Comparative ClassificationPredict classifications in other texts:Classification of Diderots Éléments de physiologie by chapter.Most chapters classed as anatomy, medicine, physiology."Avertissement": literatureChapter "Des Etres": metaphysicsChapter "Entendement": metaphysics and grammarChapter "Volonté": ethicsLeverage a contemporary classification system as way to supportsearch and result filtering.
    • 25. Clusters of KnowledgeTop: History, Geography, Literature,Grammar, etc.Middle : Physical Sciences, Physics,Chemistry, etc.Lower: Biological Sciences & Natural History
    • 26. Clusters of KnowledgeTop: History, Geography, Literature,Grammar, etc.Middle : Physical Sciences, Physics,Chemistry, etc.Lower: Biological Sciences & Natural History
    • 27. Clusters of KnowledgeTop: History, Geography, Literature,Grammar, etc.Middle : Physical Sciences, Physics,Chemistry, etc.Lower: Biological Sciences & Natural History
    • 28. Clusters of KnowledgeTop: History, Geography, Literature,Grammar, etc.Middle : Physical Sciences, Physics,Chemistry, etc.Lower: Biological Sciences & Natural History
    • 29. Similarity: DocumentsComparative and Predictive Classification one way to find meaningfulpatterns by abstracting data from the text.Typically build abstract models of a knowledge space based onidentified characteristics of documents. (Supervised learning)Document similarity: unsupervised learning based on statisticalcharacteristics of contents of texts.Many applications: Clustering, Topic Modeling, kNN classifiers etc.
    • 30. Vector Space Similarity (VSM)• Documents are ‚bags of words‛ (no word order).• Each bag can be viewed as a vector.• Vector dimensionality corresponds to the number of words in our vocabulary.• Value at each dimension is number of occurrences of the associated word in thegiven document:amour ancien livre propre1 0 3 0All document vectors taken together comprise a document-term matrix*Used for many applications: information retrieval to topic segmentation.
    • 31. Identification of similar articlesdj = (w1,j,w2,j,...,wt,j)q =(w1,q,w2,q,...,wt,q)Similarity: cosine of angle of two vectors in n-dimensional space, wheredimensionality is equal to the number of words in the vectors.
    • 32. Identification of similar articlesVector Space can be used to identify similar articles.Size matters - some unexpected results.GLOIRE, GLORIEUX, GLORIEUSEMENT, Voltaire,VANITÉ, NA, [Ethics] [0.539]VOLUPTÉ, NA, [Ethics] [0.514]FLATEUR, Jaucourt, [Ethics] [0.513]GOUVERNANTE d’enfans, Lefebvre, [0.511]CHRISTIANISME, NA, [Theology| Political science] [0.502]PAU, Jaucourt, [Modern geography] [0.493]PAU: birthplace of Henri IV.
    • 33. Identification of similar articlesASTRONOMIE, Astronomia, Formey|dAlembert:GÉOGRAPHIE [Score:0.435 Count: 6314]CHYMIE ou CHIMIE [Score:0.427 Count: 20693]BIBLIOTHEQUE [Score:0.419 Count: 15474]ARISTOTELISME [Score:0.416 Count: 27613]AEtius [Score:0.400 Count: 17607]DISCOURS PRÉLIMINAIRE DES EDITEURS [Score:0.396 Count:48133]MÉDECINE [Score:0.390 Count: 19233]Juifs, Philosophie des [Score:0.385 Count: 34041]COMETE [Score:0.383 Count: 8149]LUNE [Score:0.374 Count: 14527]WOLSTROPE [Score:0.374 Count: 6309]
    • 34. Identification of similar articles
    • 35. VSM: Strengths/Limitations• Well understood.• Standard and robust.• Many applications: kNNclassifiers, clustering, topicsegmentation.• Assigns a numeric score whichcan be used with other measures(e.g., edit distance of headword)• Numerous extensions andmodifications : Latent SemanticAnalysis, etc.• Bag of words: no notion of textorder.• Requires identification ofdocuments or block: articles.• Not suitable for running text.• Cannot identify smallerborrowings in longer texts.• Similarity can reflect topic,subject, or theme, unrelated to‚borrowing‛ or reuse.
    • 36. Similarity: PassagesInvestigation of intertextual relationships begins with the identification ofrelated passages using ‚sequence alignment.‛Technique to identify regions of similarity shared by two strings orsequences, known in computer science as the ‛longest commonsubsequence‛ (LCS) problem.Applications in many domains, including:• Bioinformatics: detection of similar DNA sequences;• Plagiarism detection in text and computer code;• Collation of texts or manuscript traditions, i.e., genetic criticism.
    • 37. Sequence AlignmentIn bioinformatics, a sequence alignment is a way of arranging the sequences ofDNA, RNA, or protein to identify regions of similarity that may be aconsequence of functional, structural, or evolutionary relationships between thesequences.
    • 38. N-grams and Sequence AlignmentLook for sequences of common words or n-grams;Only use n-grams of content words, filter out function words;Adjust parameters to allow for more flexible matching, e.g., related but notidentical passages.These are generated leaving some overlap from one to the next.Lhomme est né libre, et partout il est dans les fers. Tel se croit le maître des autres, qui nelaisse pas détre plus esclave queuxtrigram doc sequence byteshomme_libre_partout 755 208-213 5084-31libre_partout_fers 755 211-218 5098-38partout_fers_croit 755 213-221 5108-46fers_croit_maitre 755 218-223 5132-33croit_maitre_laisse 755 221-228 5149-42maitre_laisse_esclave 755 223-233 5158-58
    • 39. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityPierre Bayle, ‚Spinoza (Benoît de),‛ (T.4, p.270)Je ne sai sil est nécessaire que je dise que lendroit par où jattaque, & qui ma paru toûjours très-foible, estcelui que les Spinozistes se soucient le moins de défendre. (EE) Je finis par dire que plusieurs personnesmont affuré que sa Doctrine, considérée meme indéndamment des intérêts de la Religion, a paru fortméprisable aux plus grands Mathématiciens de notre terms. (b) On croira cela facilement, si lon se souvientde ces deux choses; lune, quil ny a point de gens qui doivent être plus persuadez de la multiplicité dessubstances que ceux qui sappliquent AaG la considération de létendue; lautre, que la plupart de cesMessieurs admettent du vuide. Or il ny a rien de plus opposé à lHypothese de Spinoza, que de soutenir quetous les corps ne se touchent point, & jamais deux Systemes nont été plus opposez que le sien & celui desAtomistes. II est daccord avec Epicure en ce qui regarde la rejection de la Providence, mais dans tout le resteleurs Systemes sont comme le feu & leau.Encyclopédie, ‚Spinosa, Philosophie de,‛ Yvon? (v.15, p.474)...ces argumens doivent convaincre la raison quil y a dans lunivers un autre agent que la matiere qui lerégit, & en dispose comme il lui plaît. Cest pourtant ce que Spinosa a entrepris de détruire. Je finis par direque plusieurs personnes ont assuré que sa doctrine considérée même indépendamment des intérêts de lareligion, a paru fort méprisable aux plus grands mathématiciens. On le croira plus facilement, si lon sesouvient de ces deux choses, lune, quil ny a point de gens qui doivent être plus persuadés de la multiplicitédes substances, que ceux qui sappliquent à la considération de létendue; lautre, que la plûpart de cessçavans admettent du vuide. Or il ny a rien de plus opposé à lhypothèse de Spinosa, que de soutenir quetous les corps ne se touchent point, & jamais deux systèmes nont été plus opposés que le sien & celui desAtomistes. Il est daccord avec Epicure en ce qui regarde la rejection de la Providence; mais dans tout le resteleurs systèmes sont comme leau & le feu.
    • 40. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityPierre Bayle, ‚Spinoza (Benoît de),‛ (T.4, p.270)Je ne sai sil est nécessaire que je dise que lendroit par où jattaque, & qui ma paru toûjours très-foible, estcelui que les Spinozistes se soucient le moins de défendre. (EE) Je finis par dire que plusieurs personnesmont affuré que sa Doctrine, considérée meme indéndamment des intérêts de la Religion, a paru fortméprisable aux plus grands Mathématiciens de notre terms. (b) On croira cela facilement, si lon se souvientde ces deux choses; lune, quil ny a point de gens qui doivent être plus persuadez de la multiplicité dessubstances que ceux qui sappliquent AaG la considération de létendue; lautre, que la plupart de cesMessieurs admettent du vuide. Or il ny a rien de plus opposé à lHypothese de Spinoza, que de soutenir quetous les corps ne se touchent point, & jamais deux Systemes nont été plus opposez que le sien & celui desAtomistes. II est daccord avec Epicure en ce qui regarde la rejection de la Providence, mais dans tout le resteleurs Systemes sont comme le feu & leau.Encyclopédie, ‚Spinosa, Philosophie de,‛ Yvon? (v.15, p.474)...ces argumens doivent convaincre la raison quil y a dans lunivers un autre agent que la matiere qui lerégit, & en dispose comme il lui plaît. Cest pourtant ce que Spinosa a entrepris de détruire. Je finis par direque plusieurs personnes ont assuré que sa doctrine considérée même indépendamment des intérêts de lareligion, a paru fort méprisable aux plus grands mathématiciens. On le croira plus facilement, si lon sesouvient de ces deux choses, lune, quil ny a point de gens qui doivent être plus persuadés de la multiplicitédes substances, que ceux qui sappliquent à la considération de létendue; lautre, que la plûpart de cessçavans admettent du vuide. Or il ny a rien de plus opposé à lhypothèse de Spinosa, que de soutenir quetous les corps ne se touchent point, & jamais deux systèmes nont été plus opposés que le sien & celui desAtomistes. Il est daccord avec Epicure en ce qui regarde la rejection de la Providence; mais dans tout le resteleurs systèmes sont comme leau & le feu.
    • 41. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityMontesquieu, De l’esprit des lois (T.1, p.134)Convient-il que les charges soient vénales? Elles ne doivent pas lêtre dans les étatsdespotiques, où il faut que les sujets soient placés ou déplacés dans un instant par le prince.Cette vénalité est bonne dans les états monarchiques, parce quelle fait faire, comme unmétier de famille, ce quon ne voudroit pas entreprendre pour la vertu; quelle destinechacun à son devoir, et rend les ordres de létat plus permanens. Suidas dit très bienquAnastase avoit fait de lempire une espèce daristocratie en vendant toutes lesmagistratures.Encyclopédie, ‚Charge,‛ Boucher d’Argis, Diderot (v.3, p.197)*Avant que de passer aux différens articles qui naissent de ces distinctions, nous allonsexposer en peu de mots le sentiment de lauteur de lesprit des lois, sur la vénalité descharges [...] Lesprit de la tyrannie est de tenir les hommes dans une oppression continuelle,afin quils sen fassent un état, & que sous ce poids leur ame perde à la longue toute énergie.3°. Mais cette vénalité est bonne dans les états monarchiques, parce que lon fait comme unmétier de famille ce quon ne feroit point par dautres motifs; quelle destine chacun à sondevoir; & quelle rend les ordres de létat plus permanens.
    • 42. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityMontesquieu, De l’esprit des lois (T.1, p.134)Convient-il que les charges soient vénales? Elles ne doivent pas lêtre dans les étatsdespotiques, où il faut que les sujets soient placés ou déplacés dans un instant par le prince.Cette vénalité est bonne dans les états monarchiques, parce quelle fait faire, comme unmétier de famille, ce quon ne voudroit pas entreprendre pour la vertu; quelle destinechacun à son devoir, et rend les ordres de létat plus permanens. Suidas dit très bienquAnastase avoit fait de lempire une espèce daristocratie en vendant toutes lesmagistratures.Encyclopédie, ‚Charge,‛ Boucher d’Argis, Diderot (v.3, p.197)*Avant que de passer aux différens articles qui naissent de ces distinctions, nous allonsexposer en peu de mots le sentiment de lauteur de lesprit des lois, sur la vénalité descharges [...] Lesprit de la tyrannie est de tenir les hommes dans une oppression continuelle,afin quils sen fassent un état, & que sous ce poids leur ame perde à la longue toute énergie.3°. Mais cette vénalité est bonne dans les états monarchiques, parce que lon fait comme unmétier de famille ce quon ne feroit point par dautres motifs; quelle destine chacun à sondevoir; & quelle rend les ordres de létat plus permanens.
    • 43. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityLocke, John, [1783], Du gouvernement civil (GALE-ECCO)Que fi le pouvtoir légiilatif a été donné par le plus grand nombre , à une personne ou àplufieurs, teulement à vie, ou pour un tems autrement limité; quand ce tems-là est fini,. lepouvoir souverain retourne à la fociété; & quand il y ef retourné de cette manière, la fociétéen peut disposer comme il lui plaît, & le remettre entre les mains de ceux quelle trouve bon,& ainfi établir une nouvelle forme de gouvernement . CHAPITRE X. De létendue du Pouvoirlégislatif. IL. PAR une communauté ou un état, il ne faut donc point entendre, ni unedémocratie, ni aucune autre forme pré- cife de gouvernement, tEncyclopédie, ‛Gouvernement," Jaucourt (v.7, p. 789)Si le pouvoir législatif a été donné par un peuple à une personne, ou à plusieurs à vie, oupour un tems limité, quand ce tems - là est fini, le pouvoir souverain retourne à la sociétédont il émane. Dès quil y est retourné, la societé en peut de nouveau disposer comme il luiplait, le remettre entre les mains de ceux quelle trouve bon, de la maniere quelle juge à -propos, & ainsi ériger une nouvelle forme de gouvernement . Que Puffendorff qualifie tantquil voudra toutes les sortes de gouvernemens mixtes du nom dirréguliers , la véritablerégularité sera toujours celle qui sera le plus conforme au bien des sociétés civiles.
    • 44. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityLocke, John, [1783], Du gouvernement civil (GALE-ECCO)Que fi le pouvtoir légiilatif a été donné par le plus grand nombre , à une personne ou àplufieurs, teulement à vie, ou pour un tems autrement limité; quand ce tems-là est fini,. lepouvoir souverain retourne à la fociété; & quand il y ef retourné de cette manière, la fociétéen peut disposer comme il lui plaît, & le remettre entre les mains de ceux quelle trouve bon,& ainfi établir une nouvelle forme de gouvernement . CHAPITRE X. De létendue du Pouvoirlégislatif. IL. PAR une communauté ou un état, il ne faut donc point entendre, ni unedémocratie, ni aucune autre forme pré- cife de gouvernement, tEncyclopédie, ‛Gouvernement," Jaucourt (v.7, p. 789)Si le pouvoir législatif a été donné par un peuple à une personne, ou à plusieurs à vie, oupour un tems limité, quand ce tems - là est fini, le pouvoir souverain retourne à la sociétédont il émane. Dès quil y est retourné, la societé en peut de nouveau disposer comme il luiplait, le remettre entre les mains de ceux quelle trouve bon, de la maniere quelle juge à -propos, & ainsi ériger une nouvelle forme de gouvernement . Que Puffendorff qualifie tantquil voudra toutes les sortes de gouvernemens mixtes du nom dirréguliers , la véritablerégularité sera toujours celle qui sera le plus conforme au bien des sociétés civiles.
    • 45.
    • 46. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityEncyclopédie, ‚Parlement d’Angleterre, ‛ Jaucourt (v. 12, p. 141)« Il est vrai, dit M. de Voltaire, dans ses mélanges de littérature & de philosophie, que cest dansdes mers de sang que les Anglois ont noyé l idole du pouvoir despotique; mais ils ne croyentpoint avoir acheté trop cher leurs lois & leurs privileges. Les autres nations nont pas versémoins de sang queux; mais ce sang quelles ont repandu pour la cause de leur liberte, na faitque cimenter leur servitude; une ville prend les armes pour défendre ses droits, soit enbarbarie, soit en Turquie; aussi - tôt des soldats mercenaires la subjuguent, des bourreaux lapunissent, & le reste du pays baise ses chaînes. Les François pensent que le gouvernementdAngleterre est plus orageux que la mer qui lenvironne, & cela est vrai; mais cest quand leroi commence la tempête; cest quand il veut se rendre maître du vaisseau dont il nest que lepremier pilote. Les guerres civiles de France ont été plus longues, plus cruelles, plusfecondes en crimes que celles dAngleterre; mais de toutes ces guerres civiles, aucune na euune liberté sage pour objet ».
    • 47. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityEncyclopédie, ‚Parlement d’Angleterre, ‛ Jaucourt (v. 12, p. 141)« Il est vrai, dit M. de Voltaire, dans ses mélanges de littérature & de philosophie, que cest dansdes mers de sang que les Anglois ont noyé l idole du pouvoir despotique; mais ils ne croyentpoint avoir acheté trop cher leurs lois & leurs privileges. Les autres nations nont pas versémoins de sang queux; mais ce sang quelles ont repandu pour la cause de leur liberte, na faitque cimenter leur servitude; une ville prend les armes pour défendre ses droits, soit enbarbarie, soit en Turquie; aussi - tôt des soldats mercenaires la subjuguent, des bourreaux lapunissent, & le reste du pays baise ses chaînes. Les François pensent que le gouvernementdAngleterre est plus orageux que la mer qui lenvironne, & cela est vrai; mais cest quand leroi commence la tempête; cest quand il veut se rendre maître du vaisseau dont il nest que lepremier pilote. Les guerres civiles de France ont été plus longues, plus cruelles, plusfecondes en crimes que celles dAngleterre; mais de toutes ces guerres civiles, aucune na euune liberté sage pour objet ».Voltaire, Lettres sur les Anglois, p. 90:Il en a coûté sans doute pour établir la liberté en Angleterre; c’est dans des mers de sangqu’on a noyé l’idole du pouvoir despotique; mais les Anglais ne croient point avoir achetétrop cher leurs lois. Les autres nations n’ont pas eu moins de troubles, n’ont pas versé moinsde sang qu’eux; mais ce sang qu’elles ont répandu pour la cause de leur liberté n’a fait quecimenter leur servitude<
    • 48. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityEncyclopédie, ‚Lacédémone, république de, ‛ Jaucourt (v. 9, p. 153)de législation, le plus hardi, le plus beau & le mieux lié qui ait jamais été conçu par aucun mortel.Après avoir fondu ensemble les trois pouvoirs du gouvernement, afin que lun ne pût pas empiétersur lautre, il brisa tous les liens de la parenté, en déclarant tous les citoyens de Lacédémone enfansnés de létat. Cest, dit un beau génie de ce siecle, lunique moyen détouffer les vices, quautoriseune apparence de vertu, & dempêcher la subdivision dun peuple en une infinité de familles ou depetites sociétés, dont les intérêts, presque toujours opposés à lintérêt public, éteindroient à la findans les ames toute espece damour de la patrie . Pour détourner encore ce malheur, & créer unevraie république, Lycurgue mit en commun toutes les terres du pays, & les divisa en 39 milleportions égales, quil distribua comme à des freres républicains qui feroient leur partage.Helvétius, Claude Adrien, De l’Esprit (p. 75)souverain soit toujours en garde? De pareilles sollicitations, qui nont que trop souvent plongé lesnations dans les plus grands malheurs, sont des sources intarissables de calamités: calamitésauxquelles peut-être on ne peut soustraire les peuples quen brisant entre les hommes tous les liensde la parenté, et déclarant tous les citoyens enfants de létat. Cest lunique moyen détouffer desvices quautorise une apparence de vertu, dempêcher la subdivision dun peuple en une infinité defamilles ou de petites sociétés, dont les intérêts, presque toujours opposés à lintérêt public,éteindroient à la fin dans les ames toute espece damour pour la patrie . Ce que jai dit prouvesuffisamment que, devant le tribunal dune petite société, lintérêt est le seul juge du mérite desactions des hommes: aussi najouterois-je rien à ce que je viens de dire, si je ne métois
    • 49. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityEncyclopédie, ‚Lacédémone, république de, ‛ Jaucourt (v. 9, p. 153)de législation, le plus hardi, le plus beau & le mieux lié qui ait jamais été conçu par aucun mortel.Après avoir fondu ensemble les trois pouvoirs du gouvernement, afin que lun ne pût pas empiétersur lautre, il brisa tous les liens de la parenté, en déclarant tous les citoyens de Lacédémone enfansnés de létat. Cest, dit un beau génie de ce siecle, lunique moyen détouffer les vices, quautoriseune apparence de vertu, & dempêcher la subdivision dun peuple en une infinité de familles ou depetites sociétés, dont les intérêts, presque toujours opposés à lintérêt public, éteindroient à la findans les ames toute espece damour de la patrie . Pour détourner encore ce malheur, & créer unevraie république, Lycurgue mit en commun toutes les terres du pays, & les divisa en 39 milleportions égales, quil distribua comme à des freres républicains qui feroient leur partage.Helvétius, Claude Adrien, De l’Esprit (p. 75)souverain soit toujours en garde? De pareilles sollicitations, qui nont que trop souvent plongé lesnations dans les plus grands malheurs, sont des sources intarissables de calamités: calamitésauxquelles peut-être on ne peut soustraire les peuples quen brisant entre les hommes tous les liensde la parenté, et déclarant tous les citoyens enfants de létat. Cest lunique moyen détouffer desvices quautorise une apparence de vertu, dempêcher la subdivision dun peuple en une infinité defamilles ou de petites sociétés, dont les intérêts, presque toujours opposés à lintérêt public,éteindroient à la fin dans les ames toute espece damour pour la patrie . Ce que jai dit prouvesuffisamment que, devant le tribunal dune petite société, lintérêt est le seul juge du mérite desactions des hommes: aussi najouterois-je rien à ce que je viens de dire, si je ne métois
    • 50. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityEncyclopédie, ‚Lacédémone, république de, ‛ Jaucourt (v. 9, p. 153)de législation, le plus hardi, le plus beau & le mieux lié qui ait jamais été conçu par aucun mortel.Après avoir fondu ensemble les trois pouvoirs du gouvernement, afin que lun ne pût pas empiétersur lautre, il brisa tous les liens de la parenté, en déclarant tous les citoyens de Lacédémone enfansnés de létat. Cest, dit un beau génie de ce siecle, lunique moyen détouffer les vices, quautoriseune apparence de vertu, & dempêcher la subdivision dun peuple en une infinité de familles ou depetites sociétés, dont les intérêts, presque toujours opposés à lintérêt public, éteindroient à la findans les ames toute espece damour de la patrie . Pour détourner encore ce malheur, & créer unevraie république, Lycurgue mit en commun toutes les terres du pays, & les divisa en 39 milleportions égales, quil distribua comme à des freres républicains qui feroient leur partage.Helvétius, Claude Adrien, De l’Esprit (p. 75)souverain soit toujours en garde? De pareilles sollicitations, qui nont que trop souvent plongé lesnations dans les plus grands malheurs, sont des sources intarissables de calamités: calamitésauxquelles peut-être on ne peut soustraire les peuples quen brisant entre les hommes tous les liensde la parenté, et déclarant tous les citoyens enfants de létat. Cest lunique moyen détouffer desvices quautorise une apparence de vertu, dempêcher la subdivision dun peuple en une infinité defamilles ou de petites sociétés, dont les intérêts, presque toujours opposés à lintérêt public,éteindroient à la fin dans les ames toute espece damour pour la patrie . Ce que jai dit prouvesuffisamment que, devant le tribunal dune petite société, lintérêt est le seul juge du mérite desactions des hommes: aussi najouterois-je rien à ce que je viens de dire, si je ne métois
    • 51. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityDan Edelstein, RobertMorrissey, and Glenn Roe.‚To Quote or not to Quote:Citation Strategies in theEncyclopédie.‛Journal of the History of Ideas74.2 (April 2013).
    • 52. Sequence Alignment and Intertextuality
    • 53. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityPierre Bayle, [1672], Pierre Bayle to Jacques Basnage:< Cela fait voir quil ny a quheur et malheur au monde et que nous adorons quelquefois lesfautes dans le meme tems que nous condamnons ce qui ne lest point Dat veniam corvisvexat censura columbas 55 . Peut etre quon reclamera la loy qui permet aux poetes de toutentreprendre. Si cela est voici dequoi former une nouvelle batterie. Ciceron dans sa haranguePour la loy <Philippus van Limborch, [1690], Philippus van Limborch to John Locke:< adeo languidus sit ac remissus erga Juriæum, quem Consiliarius in Facto suo, quod JuriæiFacto opposuit, variarum erronearum opinionum, allatis ipsius Juriæi verbis, reum egit, ut nelevissima quidem censura notatus sit. Verum in sancta hac congregatione, non minus quamalibi, Dat veniam corvis, vexat censura columbas . 9 Quidam sunt albæ gallinæ filii, 10 quibusimpotens in quoscunque hæreticos <Voltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1754], Voltaire to Joseph de Menoux:< à qui je présente ici mes respects. A légard de la défense de Mylord Bollingbroke , elle estlouvrage dun souverain et de deux autres personnes 7 : mais dat veniam corvis, vexatcensura columbas 8 . Je compte avoir lhonneur de vous envoïer incessamment les annales delEmpire , et vous supplier de leur donner place dans vôtre bibliothéque. Je nai fait cet <
    • 54. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityPierre Bayle, [1672], Pierre Bayle to Vincent Minutoli:< ouvertes et quelles vont prendre un fort beau train, à quoi ne contribuera pas peu labonté qua euë Mr Fabri den vouloir etre le chef. Rien ne sauroit apres cela causerquelque interruption à ces assemblées et on en doit esperer beaucoup Nildesperandum Teucro duce et Auspice Teucro 1 , Jenrage davoir perdu le discoursdintroduction que vous fites, et ce qui en suitte fut recueilli de lempire desBabyloniens dans les debris et les lambeaux que le <David Hume, [1743], David Hume to Francis Hutcheson:< are the most material things that occurd to me upon a Perusal of your Ethics. I mustown I am pleasd to see such Philosophy & such instructive Morals to have once settheir Foot in the Schools. I hope they will next get into the World, & then into theChurches. Nil desperandum Teucro duce & auspice Teucro . Edinr Jany. 10 1743
    • 55. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityJohn Locke [1678], John Locke to Nicolas Toinard< enim aliud majus numerari potest inter iam diu desiderata, quam mobile perpetuum. Sed cum mihicertum sit posteros multa reperturos quæ nobis non solum incognita sunt, sed etiam impossibilia videnturde eo etiam sæculo in quo te et tui similes videmus nil desperandum. Gratulor mihi et literariæ reipublicænuperam tuam forensem victoria <James Boswell [1775], James Boswell to William Johnston Temple< I am afraid I have not read books enough to be able to talk from them. You are very kind to encourageme by saying that I may overtake you in learning. Believe me, though, I have a kind of impotency of study.However, nil desperandum est. I have not yet fixed when I shall be with you. I would make it as late as Ican that the weather may be fine. I need not be at Edinburgh till the 20 of May.John Pickering [1789], John Pickering to John Langdon< the federal Courts will be so arranged as that the subjects of every State may obtain speedy andimpartial justice. The task is Herculean! May your wisdom and strength be equal to the accomplishment ofit! Nil desperandum est,1 is your maxim. I rejoice that the American Fabius & Solon <André Morellet [1800], André Morellet to Jean Pierre Louis de Fontanes, marquis de Fontanes< alibi forains de made de Staal7 mais je vous dirai toujours nil desperandum.8 Ce nest pas que jentendeTeucro duce car je crois la besogne trop difficile pour quelque Teucer que ce soit mais je compte sur la forceet la nature <
    • 56. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityElectronic Enlightenment and ARTFL-FrantextSelection of 1,419 French works from 1100 to 1825Corpus of 73 million words2,732 Aligned passages122 passages from 1500-1600:Montaigne, Michel Eyquem de, Les Essais 97 passagesRabelais, François, Gargantua 8 passagesRabelais, Francois, Le Tiers livre 4 passagesMarot, Clément, Les Epigrammes 2 passagesBodin, Jean, Six livres de la république 1 passage
    • 57. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityRabelais, François, [1534], Gargantua:rien que estudier depuis je ne sçay quand. Je nestudie poinct, de ma part. Ennostre abbaye nous ne estudions jamais, de peur des auripeaux. Nostre feuabbé disoit que cest chose monstrueuse veoir un moyne sçavant. Par Dieu ,monsieur mon amy, magis magnos clericos non sunt magis magnossapientes ... vous ne veistes oncques tant de lievres comme il y en a cesteannée.Montaigne, Michel Eyquem de, [1595], Les Essais:Et est cette coustume ancienne: car Plutarque dit que Grec et escholierestoient mots de reproche entre les Romains , et de mespris. Depuis, avecleage, jay trouvé quon avoit une grandissime raison et que magis magnosclericos non sunt magis magnos sapientes . Mais doù il puisse advenirquune ame riche de la connoissance de tant de choses
    • 58. Sequence Alignment and IntertextualityVoltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1758], Voltaire to Jean Le Rond dAlembert:Roussau en est le Diogene, et du fonds de son tonnau, il savise daboier contre nous. Il y a en luy double ingratitude. Ilattaque un art quil a exercé luy même et il écrit contre vous, qui lavez accablé déloges. En vérité magis magnos clericos bnon sunt magis magnos sapientes 6.Voltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1758], Voltaire to Jean Le Rond dAlembert:à Lausane 25 février a [1758] Dieu merci mon cher philosophe turpiter allucinaris, et magis magnos clericos non sunt magismagnos sapientes 1 sur les petites intrigues de ce monde.Voltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1760], Voltaire to Claude Adrien Helvétius:mais les philosophes ne scavent pas se conduire, magis magnos clericos, non sunt magis magnos sapientes 5 . Mr Palissot maenvoié sa pièce reliée en maroquin, et ma comblé déloges injustes qui ne sont bons quà semer la zizanie entre les frères.Voltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1763], Voltaire to Etienne Noël Damilaville:Il me parait que mr de Fourbonais avait fait autrefois un fort bon livre de finances 3 , mais comme dit François, magis magnoscléricos non sunt magis magnos sapientes 4 . Le présomptueux 5 , lambitieuJean Louis Wagnière, [1767], Jean Louis Wagnière to Etienne Noël Damilaville:Je sens que celà ne réussira pas dune certaine façon; et il arrive souvent que, magis magnos clericos, non sunt magis magnossapientes 3 , comme disait le bon maître Rabelais.Voltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1773], Voltaire to [unknown]:La plupart des gens de lettres en effet étaient pour les Verrons. Cela est honteux pour la littérature; magis magnos clericosnon sunt magis magnos sapientes 2 . M. De Marsan dont vous me parlez, qui nest connu ici que sous le nom de Durey, et quia lhonneur dêtre votre cousin germain, nest ni magnus clericus, ni magnus sapiensVoltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1773], Voltaire to Jean Le Rond dAlembert:la création expliquée en rendant lespace solide, et le commentaire sur lApocalypse , sont à peu près de même espèce. Magismagnos clericos non sunt magis magnos sapientes . 3 Ne moubliez pas, je vous en prie, auprès de m. de Condorcet..
    • 59. Towards an Historical Media StudiesVoltaire, Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne (December 1755):Beat Ludwig von May to Baron Albrecht von Haller - Friday, 2 January 1756Il à fait un Poëme sur Lisbone, quil na fait que lire à ses convives, lon men à envoyé les 8 vers que je joinsicy *<+Fin dun Poème de M r de V. sur le Malheur de Lisbone: Atome tourmenté sur cest amas de boue, Que lamort engloutit et dont le sort se joue. Mais Atome pensant, Atome dont les yeux, Guidés par la pensée ontmesuré les Cieux: Au sein de Linfini, Nous élançons Nostre Estre, Sens pouvoir un moment Nous voir etNous Conoitre. Que faut yl O Mortel? Mortel, Il faut souffrir, Se soumettre en silence, adorer et mourir.Voltaire to Elie Bertrand - Sunday, 7 March 1756Je me flatte avec raison que vous nous donnerez des conjectures plus satisfaisantes. Cette dissertation meramène encor au tout est bien. Je sçai que dans nos jours consacrez aux douleurs Par la main du plaisir nousessuions nos pleurs. Mais le plaisir senvole et passe comme une ombre, Nos chagrins, nos regrets, nospertes sont sans nombre, Le passé nest pour nous quun triste souvenir, Le présent est affreux, sil nestpoint davenir, Si la nuit du tombeau détruit lêtre qui pense. Un jour tout sera bien, voilà notre espérance.Tout est bien aujourdui, voilà lillusion. Les sages se trompaient et Dieu seul a raison etc. Voilà à peu prèscomme je voudrais finir, mais il est bien difficile de dire en vers tout ce quon voudrait. Ayez la bonté decommuniquer cette esquisse à votre respectable ami.
    • 60. Towards an Historical Media StudiesVoltaire, Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne (December 1755):Cosimo Alessandro Collini to Sébastien Dupont - Sunday, 21 March 1756Le poëte se plaint à la vérité que nous habitions un globe qui parait miné et que nous soyons exposés à des événements siaffreux, mais il se résigne à la volonté de Dieu: comme je suis convaincu du secret de votre part, je vais vous transcrire lecommencement de ce poëme. O malheureux mortels, ô terre déplorable! O de tous les fléaux assemblage éffroyable!Dinutiles douleurs éternel entretien! Philosophes trompés, qui criez tout est bien , Accourez, contemplez ces ruines affreuses,Ces débris, ces lambaux, ces cendres malheureuses, Ces femmes, ces enfants lun sur lautre entassés; Sous ces marbresrompus ces membres dispersés; Cent mille infortunés que la terre dévore, Qui sanglants, déchirés, et palpitans encoreEnterrés sous leurs toits terminent sans secours Dans lhorreur des tourments leurs lamentables jours. Aux cris demi-formésde leur voix expirantes, Au spectacle effrayant de leurs cendres fumantes, Direz -vous etc. . . . . . Je vous ai ennuié plus que deraison.Gabriel de Seigneux, seigneur de Correvon to Baron Albrecht von Haller - Saturday, 27 March 1756Laprès midy il eut la Complaisance de nous lire lui même sa belle et grande pièce sur les malheurs de Lisbonne. *<+ Voici laConclusion, et cest tout ce que Jay pû avoir de Cette pièce retouchée. Je sçais que dans nos Jours consacrés aux douleurs Parla main du plaisir nous essuions nos pleurs , Mais le plaisir senvole et passe comme une ombre , Nos chagrins, nos regrets,nos pertes sont sans nombre , Le passé nest pour nous quun triste souvenir ; Le présent est affreux sil nest point davenir ; Sila Nuit du Tombeau détruit lEtre qui pense . Un jour tout sera bien; voilà notre Espérance : Tout est bien aujourdhui; voilàlIllusion ; Les sages me trompoient; et Dieu seul a raison . Humble dans mes soupirs, soumis dans ma souffrance , Jeninterroge point la suprême Puissance . Sur un ton moins lugubre, on me vît autrefois Chanter des vains plaisirs lesséduisantes loix.Jacob Vernes to Jean Jacques Rousseau - July 1756laisserez-vous passer sans mot dire ces tristes choses ? Je vous signale surtout ce passage: ‘Quand la mort met le comble auxmaux que jai soufferts Le beau soulagement dêtre mangé des vers, Tristes calculateurs des misères humaines Ne meconsolez point, vous aigrissez mes peines Et je ne vois en vous que leffort impuissant Dun fier infortuné qui feint dêtrecontent’
    • 61. Towards an Historical Media StudiesVoltaire, Poème sur le désastre de Lisbonne (December 1755):Jean-Jacques Rousseau to Voltaire - Wednesday, 18 August 1756(6,700 word letter: response to Voltaire – "On Optimism")Quand vous attaquez, par exemple, la chaine des Etres si bien décrite par Pope, vous ditesquil nest pas vrai que si lon ôtoit un atome du monde le monde ne pourroit subsister. Vouscitez là dessus M. de Crouzas 13 , puis vous ajoutez que la nature nest asservie à aucunemesure précise ni à aucune forme précise, que nulle Planette ne se meut dans une courbeabsolument réguliére, que nul être connu nest dune figure précisément mathématique, quenulle quantité précise nest requise pour nulle opération, que la nature nagit jamaisrigoureusement, quainsi on na aucune raison dassurer quun atôme de moins sur la terreseroit la cause de la destruction de la terre. Je vous avoüe que sur tout cela, Monsieur, je suisplus frappé de la force de lassertion que de celle du raisonnement et quen cette occasion jecéderois avec plus de confiance à votre autorité quà vos preuves.
    • 62. Towards an Historical Media Studies
    • 63. Towards an Historical Media Studies
    • 64. Intertextuality and Book HistoryFound 2 Aligned Passages________________________________________1. Source: Voltaire, 1694-1778., [1734], Lettres Philosophiques:et écrivain élégant, et ce qui est encore plus étonnant, cest quil vivoit dans un siécle où lon ne connoissoit guéres lart debien écrire, encore moins la bonne philosophie. Il a été, comme cest lusage parmi les hommes, plus estimé après sa mortque de son vivant: ses ennemis étoient à la cour de Londres, ses admirateurs étoient dans toute lEurope . Lorsque lemarquis dEffiat amena en Angleterre la princesse Marie , fille de Henri Le Grand , qui devoit épouser le prince de Galle , ceministre alla visiter Bacon , qui alors étant [Page Link]Target: Voltaire [François Marie Arouet], [1733], Voltaire to Pierre Robert Le Cornier de Cideville:afin que je puisse faire lerrata, et marquer les endroits qui exigeront des cartons. Je prévoy quil y en aura baucoup. Je mesouviens entre autres de cet endroit à larticle Bacon, Ses ennemis étoient à Londres ses admirateurs . Il y a, ou il doit y avoirdans le manuscript, Ses ennemis étoient à la cour de Londres, ses admirateurs étoient dans toutte lEurope 2 . De pareillesfautes, quand elles vont à deux lignes, demandent absolument des cartons. De plus [Page Link]________________________________________2. Source: Voltaire, 1694-1778., [1734], Lettres Philosophiques:la seconde par son rang, est la premiere par son crédit. Les seigneurs et les évêques peuvent bien rejetter le bill descommunes pour les taxes; mais il ne leur est pas permis dy rien changer; il faut ou quils le reçoivent ou quils le rejettentsans restriction. Quand le bill est confirmé par les lords et aprouvé par le roi, alors tout le monde paie, chacun donne nonselon sa qualité (ce qui est absurde,) mais selon son revenu; il ny a point de taille ni de capitation arbitraire, mais une taxeréelle sur les terres . Elles ont toutes été évaluées , sous le fameux roi Guillaume III et mises au-dessous de leur prix. La taxesubsiste toujours la même quoique les revenus des terres aïent augmenté, ainsi personne nest foulé et personne ne se plaint.Le païsan na [Page Link]Target: Jean François Gamonet, [1764], Jean François Gamonet to Voltaire:2 Tom. 8, page 248, Sur le Gouvernement Anglois ‘Un homme, parcequil est noble ou Prêtre, nest point icÿ exempt depayer Certaines taxes. Quand le Bil est Confirmé par les Lords et aprouvé par le Roÿ, alors tout le monde paÿe, Chacundonne, non selon sa qualité, ce qui seroit absurde, mais selon son Revenu. Il ny a point de taille nÿ de Capitation arbitraire,mais une taxe réelle sur les terres .’ 3 Tom. 8, page 26 ‘Les Impôts sont nécessaires, La meilleure manière de les lever estCelle [Page Link]
    • 65. Intertextuality and Book HistoryVoltaire to Pierre Robert Le Cornier de CidevilleFriday, 3 July 1733Je renvoye à J . . . la dernière épreuve1 avec une petite addition. Je vous suplie deluy dire denvoyer sur le champ au messager à ladresse de Demoulin, deuxexemplaires complets afin que je puisse faire lerrata, et marquer les endroits quiexigeront des cartons. Je prévoy quil y en aura baucoup. Je me souviens entreautres de cet endroit à larticle Bacon, Ses ennemis étoient à Londres ses admirateurs. Ily a, ou il doit y avoir dans le manuscript, Ses ennemis étoient à la cour de Londres, sesadmirateurs étoient dans toutte lEurope2. De pareilles fautes, quand elles vont à deuxlignes, demandent absolument des cartons.1. Of the Lettres philosophiques.2. Either Voltaires memory deceived him or the mistake was corrected in time, forit does not appear in the Amsterdam [Rouen] or the Basle [London] editions of1734, nor is the appropriate leaf in the latter edition a cancel; Lanson went astrayhere in his edition of the Lettres philosophiques (i.153n) by uncritically acceptingVoltaires complaint.
    • 66. Intertextuality and Book HistoryVoltaire, 1694-1778. [1734], Lettres philosophiques (Ed. G. Lanson. Paris, Hachette, 1915-1917.)Il faut commencer par le fameux comte de Verulam connu en Europe sous le nomde Bacon qui étoit son nom de famille. Il étoit fils dun garde des sceaux, et fut long-temschancelier sous le roi Jacques Premier; cependant au milieu des intrigues de la cour, et desoccupations de sa charge qui demandoient un homme tout entier, il trouva le tems dêtregrand philosophe, bon historien et écrivain élégant, et ce qui est encore plus étonnant, cestquil vivoit dans un siécle où lon ne connoissoit guéres lart de bien écrire, encore moins labonne philosophie. Il a été, comme cest lusage parmi les hommes, plus estimé après sa mortque de son vivant: ses ennemis étoient à la cour de Londres, ses admirateurs étoient danstoute lEurope.Voltaire, Lettres philosophiques (Œuvres complètes de Voltaire, éd. Louis Moland, Paris, 1877-85, tome 22)Le fameux baron de Verulam, connu en Europe sous le nom de Bacon, était fils d’un gardedes sceaux, et fut longtemps chancelier sous le roi Jacques Ier. Cependant, au milieu desintrigues de la cour et des occupations de sa charge, qui demandaient un homme tout entier,il trouva le temps d’être grand philosophe, bon historien, et écrivain élégant; et, ce qui estencore plus étonnant, c’est qu’il vivait dans un siècle où l’on ne connaissait guère l’art de bienécrire, encore moins la bonne philosophie. Il a été, comme c’est l’usage parmi les hommes,plus estimé après sa mort que de son vivant. Ses ennemis étaient à la cour de Londres, sesadmirateurs étaient les étrangers.
    • 67. Intertextuality and Book HistoryJoseph de La Porte, Le voyageur françois, ou La connoissance de l’ancien et du nouveaumonde, Paris, 1773 (Gale-ECCO).Sakespéar, si célebre par les beautés & les défauts de ses tragédies Bacon, siconnu par ses dignités , fa chute, ôc letendue de ses connoissances;Fairfax, qui atraduit le Tasse avec un naturel, une exactitude, une élégance qui étonnent clansson siecle, ont illustré le règne de Jacques I. Ce prince lui-même avoit composéplusieurs ouvrages, dans lesquels on reconnoît un génie au-dessuj du médiocre.Bacon , chancelier du royaume , au milieu des intrigues de la cour ôc dtsoccupations de la charge, trouva le tems dêtre un grand philosophe , un bonhistorien , un écrivain élégant. 11 fut, comme cest lissage, moinsestimé de son vivant, quaprès fa mort. Ses ennemis étoient à Londres , sesadmirateurs dans toute lEurope.Voltaire to Pierre Robert Le Cornier de Cideville (Friday, 3 July 1733)Je me souviens entre autres de cet endroit à larticle Bacon, Ses ennemis étoient àLondres ses admirateurs. Il y a, ou il doit y avoir dans le manuscript, Ses ennemisétoient à la cour de Londres, ses admirateurs étoient dans toutte lEurope
    • 68. 19th century alignments in Frantext (using d3):Special thanks to Mark Wolff, Hartwick College
    • 69. Alignment visualizations (using d3):Special thanks to Mark Wolff, Hartwick College
    • 70. Infinite Archive or Trackless Desert(Alexandria vs. Babel)When it was proclaimed that the Library contained all books, the first impressionwas one of extravagant happiness. All men felt themselves to be the masters of anintact and secret treasure. There was no personal or world problem whoseeloquent solution did not exist in some hexagon. The universe was justified, theuniverse suddenly usurped the unlimited dimensions of hope.[...]Perhaps my old age and fearfulness deceive me, but I suspect that the humanspecies—the unique species—is about to be extinguished, but the Library willendure: illuminated, solitary, infinite, perfectly motionless, equipped withprecious volumes, useless, incorruptible, secret.- Jorge-Luis Borges, The Library of Babel, 1941
    • 71. Infinite Archive or Trackless Desert(Alexandria vs. Babel)When it was proclaimed that the Library contained all books, the first impressionwas one of extravagant happiness. All men felt themselves to be the masters of anintact and secret treasure. There was no personal or world problem whoseeloquent solution did not exist in some hexagon. The universe was justified, theuniverse suddenly usurped the unlimited dimensions of hope.[...]Perhaps my old age and fearfulness deceive me, but I suspect that the humanspecies—the unique species—is about to be extinguished, but the Library willendure: illuminated, solitary, infinite, perfectly motionless, equipped withprecious volumes, useless, incorruptible, secret.- Jorge-Luis Borges, The Library of Babel, 1941This huge library, growing into unwieldiness, threatening to become atrackless desert of print—how intolerably it weighed upon the spirit!- George Gissing, New Grub Street, 1891
    • 72. Making Tracks in the Infinite Archive:Influence and Intertextuality• Intertextuality as an approach to ‘directed’ or scalable readingover large data sets (curated or uncurated), rather than distantnon-reading<• Automatically identify intertextual relationships that canenrich scholarly interaction with digital resources and linkeddata.• Enable a new ‚historical media studies‛ that valorizes boththe virutuality of the digital archive and the materiality ofindividual texts.
    • 73. Making Tracks in the Infinite Archive:Influence and IntertextualityTout texte est un intertexte ; d’autres textes sont présents en lui, àdes niveaux variables, sous des formes plus ou moinsreconnaissables : les textes de la culture antérieure et ceux de laculture environnante ; tout texte est un tissu nouveau de citationsrévolues.- Roland Barthes, ‚Texte (théorie du)‛, 1973.Criticism is the art of knowing the hidden roads that go frompoem to poem.- Harold Bloom, The Anxiety of Influence, 1973.
    • 74. Thank you.email: glenn.roe@mod-langs.ox.ac.uktwitter: @glennhroeOxford e-Research Centre:http://www.oerc.ox.ac.uk/The ARTFL Project:http://artfl-project.uchicago.edu/