Grassroots Crisis Mapping
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Grassroots Crisis Mapping

on

  • 1,270 views

Grassroots Crisis Mapping, a presentation for the June 1, 2010, spatial@ucsb Local10 Conference.

Grassroots Crisis Mapping, a presentation for the June 1, 2010, spatial@ucsb Local10 Conference.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,270
Views on SlideShare
1,213
Embed Views
57

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
6
Comments
1

2 Embeds 57

http://www.slideshare.net 53
http://www.linkedin.com 4

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Presenter Transcript

    Slide 1
    Alan Glennon, spatial@ucsb

    Slide 2
    This morning I'm going to discuss two use cases of non-authoritative crisis

    mapping: the Jesusita Fire and the Haitian Earthquake

    Slide 3
    In our area, we have numerous potential natural and manmade threats: from

    the land, sea, and air.

    Slide 4
    Generally, when responding to these crises, we think about response

    centered around government agencies and NGOS --

    Slide 5
    a room full of experts mapping and getting things right, accurate… and then

    vetted information is released via a press conference or bulletin.

    Slide 6
    …vetted information is released via a press conference or bulletin.

    Slide 7
    ...and from there, the press repackages it as stories for tv, radio,

    newspaper, and online.

    Slide 8
    In the progression, the public is primarily a consumer of data.

    Slide 9
    With the rise of the Internet, mobile phones, social networks, and online

    discussion, the public has begun inserting itself into the chain.

    Slide 10
    So, in this regard, let's look at the Jesusita Fire. The fire was started

    about 1:30pm on May 5, 2009. …the latest of several significant fires in

    our area. ...and for each of these fires, Internet discussion has been

    increasing and happening faster.

    Slide 11
    So, with the Jesusita Fire, when I learned about it, I started looking into

    ways to capture the information flows as the occurred during the fire.

    Slide 12
    I began writing a timeline of events. Noticing items like the first

    Internet references to the fire began less than thirty minutes after

    ignition.

    Slide 13
    Note, that the fire is at this point, a wildland fire -- away from any

    structures -- the smoke was visible though.
    In fact, after only a few minutes of origin postings, there's a complaint

    that there's no news anywhere.

    Slide 14
    Like anyone else, I had numerous data sources to pull from... and besides

    keeping notes on the simple accounting of events, I decided a map would

    work well to synthesize the data.
    The idea was not particularly original though -- I did a websearch and

    found several other online maps tagged with the name 'Jesusita' --

    particularly using Google's MyMaps feature.

    Slide 15
    MyMaps is a feature of Google Maps that allows users to annotate their

    existing base maps with points, polylines, and polygons, and share them,

    either as view only or as a collaborative. Among the Jesusita MyMaps, one

    -- by a user named 'Ethan' already contained some county warning boundaries

    and was also fully editable by anyone. By the way, Ethan is actually the

    infant son of UCSB staff member Mark Grosch.

    Slide 16
    As I used the map, I began communicating with my fellow grad students and

    they started assisting too. We drew evacuation areas, the fire boundary,

    wind direction, school closings, and anything else we thought relevant. The

    crowd fixed erroneous data when it was contributed. The map was actively

    monitored until all evacuation were canceled on May 14th.

    Slide 17
    By the end of the Jesusita Fire, at least 34 related Google MyMaps had been

    created. The top seven garned over one million users, but the Ethan map led

    them all with nearly 600,000. The question was, 'why?'

    Slide 18
    perhaps it involves community. Among all the maps, the Ethan map would

    allow users to change data and discuss when they were unsure. People could

    ask questions and get public responses. The map also persisted; this in

    contrast to some news media maps that were abandoned each day with data

    relevant to that day's story.

    Slide 19
    but it didn't all work well. all with a limited symbology set, all Google

    MyMap look similar. there were occasional errors and some were difficult to

    correct. we had exuberant users contribute large unrelated datasets, and we

    had no mechanism to elegantly correct them. -- we had to crowdsource the

    tedious corrective work.

    Slide 20
    So -- in all, there were many lessons learned from the Jesusita

    crowdsourced mapping event -- particularly regarding the need for

    curatorial tools and the dynamics of real-time community discussion.

    Slide 21
    The second case is the January 2010 Haitian earthquake. Unlike Jesusita, I

    did not conduct any direct mapping efforts. I have only been a keen

    observer of the situation -- as I am interested in leveraging the lessons

    and avoiding its failings. First, this was a massive natural and

    humanitarian disaster -- 10s of thousands of deaths and structures

    destroyed. The world attention was focused on this event.

    Slide 22
    I am sure many Internet-based efforts were attempted during the relief

    effort, but two in particular, appear to have been taken hold -- Ushahidi

    and OpenStreetMap. Ushahidi is an open source project that allows affected

    populations to send a message, via SMS, smartphone, email, or webpage, to a

    centralized repository.

    Slide 23
    For Haiti, a Ushahidi instance was up and running within 2 hours -- set up

    by a group of several students at tufts University. Through the course of

    the relief effort, the students would curate incoming messages, translate

    them, geocode them onto a map, and get the information to the Red Cross.

    Along the way, the engage several hundred local volunteers at the

    university and online -- and had thousands of Haitian volunteers help them

    with translation.

    Slide 24
    The second important crowdsourced mapping tool from the Haitian quake is

    OpenStreetMap. OpenStreetMap is an open editable global map project -- like

    a wikipedia for maps. Within 26 hours of the quake, Google and GeoEye

    provided post event imagery and a group of volunteers made the imagery

    available to the open source community. The community responded.

    Slide 25
    It created a services based on the imagery to be used in osm - marked

    damaged areas - used open source tools to create overlays, and provided

    data products (like shapefiles and GPS file exports updated every 5

    minutes). Within days, OpenStreetMap became known on the ground as the

    best, most up-to-date map of Port-au-Prince. Here's an example of the work.

    Slide 26
    Pre-event

    Slide 27
    Post-event

    Slide 28
    Again not everything worked perfectly, large spatial datasets can be

    difficult to transfer and often had to be manually carried from one field

    group to the next, technology had to be assembled on the fly, and trust and

    partnerships had to be created out of necessity.

    Slide 29
    The bottom line though is that these grassroots, real-time community

    efforts can create useful data and, particularly in the case of Haiti, save

    lives.

    Slide 30
    To close, how can we on the south coast engage the successes of Jesusita

    and Haiti, and steer clear of the pitfalls?

    I think the first is to prepare for the community discussion, to know that

    it will happen, and have an idea of what to expect.
    have interested partners, like us, get together and figure out what's the

    best way to collaborate
    know what's out there and how the community is likely to use it.
    equip ourselves with expertise to get things done.

    Slide 31
    This meeting today is the place to start such an effort.
    …and to create a formal place to continue the conversation, we will be

    hosting Crisis Commons work sessions afterhours on the second Tuesday of

    the month.

    Slide 32
    Thank you.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • AlanGlennon, spatial@ucsb
  • This morning I'm going to discuss two use cases of non-authoritative crisis mapping: the Jesusita Fire and the Haitian Earthquake
  • In our area, we have numerous potential natural and manmade threats: from the land, sea, and air.
  • Generally, when responding to these crises, we think about response centered around government agencies and NGOS --
  • a room full of experts mapping and getting things right,accurate… and then vetted information is released via a press conference or bulletin.
  • …vetted information is released via a press conference or bulletin.
  • ...and from there, the press repackages it as stories for tv, radio, newspaper, and online.
  • In the progression, the public is primarily a consumer of data.
  • With the rise of the Internet, mobile phones, social networks, and online discussion, the public has begun inserting itself into the chain.
  • So, in this regard, let's look at the Jesusita Fire. The fire was started about 1:30pm on May 5, 2009. …the latest of several significant fires in our area. ...and for each of these fires, Internet discussion has been increasing and happening faster.
  • So, with the Jesusita Fire, when I learned about it, I started looking into ways to capture the information flows as the occurred during the fire.
  • I began writing a timeline of events.Noticing items like the first Internet references to the fire began less than thirty minutes after ignition.
  • Note, that the fire is at this point, a wildland fire -- away from any structures -- the smoke was visible though.In fact, after only a few minutes of origin postings, there's a complaint that there's no news anywhere.
  • Like anyone else, I had numerous data sources to pull from... and besides keeping notes on the simple accounting of events, I decided a map would work well to synthesize the data.The idea was not particularly original though -- I did a websearch and found several other online maps tagged with the name "Jesusita" -- particularly using Google's MyMaps feature.
  • MyMaps is a feature of Google Maps that allows users to annotate their existing base maps with points, polylines, and polygons, and share them, either as view only or as a collaborative. Among the JesusitaMyMaps, one -- by a user named "Ethan" already contained some county warning boundaries and was also fully editable by anyone. By the way, Ethan is actually the infant son of UCSB staff member Mark Grosch.
  • As I used the map, I began communicating with my fellow grad students and they started assisting too. We drew evacuation areas, the fire boundary, wind direction, school closings, and anything else we thought relevant. The crowd fixed erroneous data when it was contributed. The map was actively monitored until all evacuation were canceled on May 14th.
  • By the end of the Jesusita Fire, at least 34 related Google MyMaps had been created. The top seven garned over one million users, but the Ethan map led them all with nearly 600,000. The question was, "why?"
  • perhaps it involves community. Among all the maps, the Ethan map would allow users to change data and discuss when they were unsure. People could ask questions and get public responses. The map also persisted; this in contrast to some news media maps that were abandoned each day with data relevant to that day's story.
  • but it didn't all work well. all with a limited symbology set, all Google MyMap look similar. there were occasional errors and some were difficult to correct. we had exuberant users contribute large unrelated datasets, and we had no mechanism to elegantly correct them. -- we had to crowdsource the tedious corrective work.
  • So -- in all, there were many lessons learned from the Jesusitacrowdsourced mapping event -- particularly regarding the need for curatorial tools and the dynamics of real-time community discussion. By the way, since I am moving through some of these slides fast -- these presentation is available online at http://slideshare.net/glennon
  • The second case is the January 2010 Haitian earthquake. Unlike Jesusita, I did not conduct any direct mapping efforts. I have only been a keen observer of the situation -- as I am interested in leveraging the lessons and avoiding its failings. First, this was a massive natural and humanitarian disaster -- 10s of thousands of deaths and structures destroyed. The world attention was focused on this event.
  • I am sure many Internet-based efforts were attempted during the relief effort, but two in particular, appear to have been taken hold -- Ushahidi and OpenStreetMap.Ushahidi is an open source project that allows affected populations to send a message, via SMS, smartphone, email, or webpage, to a centralized repository.
  • For Haiti, a Ushahidi instance was up and running within 2 hours -- set up by a group of several students at tufts University. Through the course of the relief effort, the students would curate incoming messages, translate them, geocode them onto a map, and get the information to the Red Cross. Along the way, the engage several hundred local volunteers at the university and online -- and had thousands of Haitian volunteers help them with translation.
  • The second important crowdsourced mapping tool from the Haitian quake is OpenStreetMap. OpenStreetMap is an open editable global map project -- like a wikipedia for maps. Within 26 hours of the quake, Google and GeoEye provided post event imagery and a group of volunteers made the imagery available to the open source community. The community responded.
  • It created a services based on the imagery to be used in osm - marked damaged areas - used open source tools to create overlays, and provided data products (like shapefiles and GPS file exports updated every 5 minutes). Within days, OpenStreetMap became known on the ground as the best, most up-to-date map of Port-au-Prince. Here's an example of the work. before and after.
  • Pre-event
  • Post-event
  • Again not everything worked perfectly, large spatial datasets can be difficult to transfer and often had to be manually carried from one field group to the next, technology had to be assembled on the fly, and trust and partnerships had to be created out of necessity.
  • The bottom line though is that these grassroots, real-time community efforts can create useful data and, particularly in the case of Haiti, save lives.
  • To close, how can we on the south coast engage the successes of Jesusita and Haiti, and steer clear of the pitfalls? I think the first is to prepare for the community discussion, to know that it will happen, and have an idea of what to expect.have interested partners, like us, get together and figure out what's the best way to collaborateknow what's out there and how the community is likely to use it.equip ourselves with expertise to get things done.
  • This meeting today is the place to start such an effort.…Crisis Commons work session afterhours on the second Tuesday of the month.
  • Thank you.

Grassroots Crisis Mapping Grassroots Crisis Mapping Presentation Transcript

  • Photo: Santa Barbara Harbor 25 May 2010, Alan Glennon
  • Photo: Stearns Wharf 25 May 2010, Alan Glennon
  • storms fire debris flows earthquake tsunami Photo: Stearns Wharf 25 May 2010, Alan Glennon
  • Photo: Chile Earthquake 02March2010, IFRC
  • Photo: NASA
  • Photo: NASA Photo: Station Fire Press Conference, Photo: California EMA
  • Photo: Media Circus by Tony Gambone Photo: NASA Photo: Station Fire Press Conference, Photo: California EMA
  • Photo: Media Circus by Tony Gambone Photo: NASA Photo: Jesusita Fire, Torbak Hopper
  • Photo: Jesusita Fire, Torbak Hopper
  • Photo: Jesusita Fire, Kevin Alan Baum
  • Photo: Jesusita Fire, Kevin Alan Baum Jesusita Fire Timeline http://arogi.com/fireline
  • Photo: Mark Grosch, UCSB Photo: Jesusita Fire, Kevin Alan Baum Jesusita Fire Timeline http://arogi.com/fireline
  • Numerous Jesusita Fire Timeline http://arogi.com/fireline
  • Source: Google MyMaps Photo: Mark Grosch, UCSB Photo: Jesusita Fire, Kevin Alan Baum
  • Source: Google MyMaps Photo: Jesusita Fire, Kevin Alan Baum
  • VISITORS MAP 595,673 Jesusita Fire (Ethan) 188,308 SBC Jesusita Fire Santa Barbara, CA (Robert O'Connor – fire news blog) 89,214 Jesusita Fire Map (Randy - Independent.com) Source: Google 67,525 Jesusita Fire in Santa Barbara - LA Times map (Los Angeles Times) 27,777 Map of burned homes in Santa Barbara (Los Angeles Times) 26,330 Jesusita Fire Evacuation Areas: Approximation (COSB) 25,454 Santa Barbara 'Jesusita Fire' (ABC7 Eyewitness News) Source: Glennon. http://arogi.com/fireline/JesusitaVGI.htm
  • • • • • • • • Photo: Rhonda Glennon 2010
  • Photo: Robert Montalvo
  • Photo: Haitian national palace; United Nations Development Programme
  • Photo: Haitian national palace; United Nations Development Programme Photo: Tufts Fletcher School Haiti Crisis Response 2010; Ushahidi
  • Photo: Tufts Fletcher School Haiti Crisis Response 2010; Ushahidi
  • Photo: Haitian national palace; United Nations Development Programme
  • Photo: Haitian national palace; United Nations Development Programme
  • • • • •
  • Photo: Santa Barbara Harbor 25 May 2010, Alan Glennon
  • Photo: Santa Barbara Harbor 25 May 2010, Alan Glennon