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Entering the Mobile Space

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Scott Gledhill of pinchzoom, a mobile application collective, discusses his experience moving from a front-end web developer to working with a team on iPhone apps, mobile applications and the mobile …

Scott Gledhill of pinchzoom, a mobile application collective, discusses his experience moving from a front-end web developer to working with a team on iPhone apps, mobile applications and the mobile web. Find out the advantages, disadvantages, strengths and weaknesses in going from web development to the strange, new world of mobile development.

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  • - you understand the ‘personas of the web’
    - this roles have been established over 10 years... (and continues to evolve)
    - producers, SEOs, designers, developers, sales...
  • - mobile community is booming over the last 2 years
    - who are some of the new people in this space?
  • guru - 10 years plus, writing books + blogging (elders)
    the advertising / business person - funding big ideas, opportunity in a new market
    developer - hacker, thinks of something and gets it up quickly (100,000+ apps in Itunes)
    ideas person - what if there was an app for this?? or this?
    anti-apple person - Zune carrying, Apple hating ‘other platform’ people
  • guru - 10 years plus, writing books + blogging (elders)
    the advertising / business person - funding big ideas, opportunity in a new market
    developer - hacker, thinks of something and gets it up quickly (100,000+ apps in Itunes)
    ideas person - what if there was an app for this?? or this?
    anti-apple person - Zune carrying, Apple hating ‘other platform’ people
  • guru - 10 years plus, writing books + blogging (elders)
    the advertising / business person - funding big ideas, opportunity in a new market
    developer - hacker, thinks of something and gets it up quickly (100,000+ apps in Itunes)
    ideas person - what if there was an app for this?? or this?
    anti-apple person - Zune carrying, Apple hating ‘other platform’ people
  • guru - 10 years plus, writing books + blogging (elders)
    the advertising / business person - funding big ideas, opportunity in a new market
    developer - hacker, thinks of something and gets it up quickly (100,000+ apps in Itunes)
    ideas person - what if there was an app for this?? or this?
    anti-apple person - Zune carrying, Apple hating ‘other platform’ people
  • guru - 10 years plus, writing books + blogging (elders)
    the advertising / business person - funding big ideas, opportunity in a new market
    developer - hacker, thinks of something and gets it up quickly (100,000+ apps in Itunes)
    ideas person - what if there was an app for this?? or this?
    anti-apple person - Zune carrying, Apple hating ‘other platform’ people
  • - front-end developer, designer
    - HTML, CSS, JavaScript, Photoshop
  • - cHTML, tables layouts, very simple markup
  • - I hated the using the mobile web
    - I didn’t want to develop for it.
  • - iPhone introduces a new mobile experience (June 29, 2007)
    - a mobile web that works
    - a new industry for developers, website builders
  • - PinchZoom
    - mobile & web apps collective
    - build cool stuff, take advantage of this new environment
  • Brian Fling
    - mobile web applications
    - launched with original iPhone release
    - showcase what is possible on a mobile device, highlighting the use of web and mobile standards.
  • Brian Fling
    - mobile web applications
    - launched with original iPhone release
    - showcase what is possible on a mobile device, highlighting the use of web and mobile standards.
  • Brian Fling
    - mobile web applications
    - launched with original iPhone release
    - showcase what is possible on a mobile device, highlighting the use of web and mobile standards.
  • Brian Fling
    - mobile web applications
    - launched with original iPhone release
    - showcase what is possible on a mobile device, highlighting the use of web and mobile standards.
  • Garret Murray
  • Garret Murray
  • Garret Murray
  • David Kaneda
  • David Kaneda
  • David Kaneda
  • David Kaneda
  • - front-end + design in the mobile ecosystem
    - what are our strengths?
    - how can we get into the game?
  • - the new environment
    - what you will encounter in the mobile world
  • - mobile generation is growing exponentially
    - kids know this technology and learn it very quickly
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1980 - 1990
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1980 - 1990
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1980 - 1990
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1980 - 1990
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1980 - 1990
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1990 - 2000
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1990 - 2000
  • source: Millennials go to College: 2nd Edition
    - born 1990 - 2000
  • - stuff I would rather not know about mobile
    - many layers of complexity to create a seamless mobile experience
    - this can cause frustrating user experiences
  • - long contracts, crappy service, poor support
    - these are all a barrier to your users
  • - developers really only need to concentrate on these top layers
    - Cocoa Touch (iPhone SDK), Android SDK, Java ME
    - APIs to create applications + access native features of each device
  • - what platform do you develop for?
    - Android, iPhone (native) or the mobile web?
  • - tasks the user is trying to do
    - text messaging, access internet, get a location (GPS)
    - opportunities for failure for your apps
  • - not in the office anymore...
  • - not sitting at your desk, location based
    - noise constraints, low light, one hand
  • - simple, immediate tasks, not browsing leisurely
    - specific goals (eg. send text, find address)
  • - doing stuff while waiting for something else (eg. the bus)
    - low levels of concentration, no wifi, interruptions
  • - Apple has 21% marketplace in Australia
    - developers are a major key to Apple’s success
    - but, how do they treat developers? how is the process of creating apps?
  • - fake, 29 second animation
    - sold this anyway, without the app store (jailbreak)
  • - baby shaker approved, then pulled from the Apple store
  • - NIN + South Park - “objectionable content”, still for sale on iTunes
    - Fracture - breaking normal button uses, despite similar apps on the market
    - Knife Music - edited the ‘f’ word, got submitted
  • - NIN + South Park - “objectionable content”, still for sale on iTunes
    - Fracture - breaking normal button uses, despite similar apps on the market
    - Knife Music - edited the ‘f’ word, got submitted
  • - NIN + South Park - “objectionable content”, still for sale on iTunes
    - Fracture - breaking normal button uses, despite similar apps on the market
    - Knife Music - edited the ‘f’ word, got submitted
  • - NIN + South Park - “objectionable content”, still for sale on iTunes
    - Fracture - breaking normal button uses, despite similar apps on the market
    - Knife Music - edited the ‘f’ word, got submitted
  • - NIN + South Park - “objectionable content”, still for sale on iTunes
    - Fracture - breaking normal button uses, despite similar apps on the market
    - Knife Music - edited the ‘f’ word, got submitted
  • - NIN + South Park - “objectionable content”, still for sale on iTunes
    - Fracture - breaking normal button uses, despite similar apps on the market
    - Knife Music - edited the ‘f’ word, got submitted
  • Ego - having trouble with simple updates for bug fixes
  • - urgent updates can’t get through
    - simple bug fixes stay broken until Apple approves new versions
  • - it can get messy
    - apps reputations get destroyed
    - users get cranky, leave bad reviews
  • - Apple is setting an expectation of what developers should do
    - watering down the app store, less quality
  • - what devices are of interest to us as developers???
    - not a detailed overview of devices...
  • - mobile 2.0 leader and innovator (June 2007)
    - iPhone claimed fastest consumption of any device, beating the DVD (U.S.)
    - changed the mobile landscape in the last two years (WEBKIT)
  • - great for Apple haters
    - webKit based OS
    - not yet released in Australia
  • - still popular with business types
    - rumoured to get WebKit OS in future
    - still a big market
  • - Google’s open source contribution (Android 2.0, Webkit browser)
    - bit rough, but typically Google (let it out, let people work on it)
    - running Nook (e-book)
  • - not exciting phones
    - cruder, older applications - music, internet, taking photos - 2.5G
    - lowest common denominators (for most Western markets)
  • - decline of legacy browsers Symbian OS, Windows and old Palm
    - rise of the WebKit and Open Source platforms
  • - new peers / professional networks
    - you can learn a lot from new crowds...
  • - a new hype for everyone
    - ‘web 2.0 era dangerous’ - every is pretty excited but can be over-hyped
    - big money expectations
  • - for developers, a new ‘web standards’ argument begins
    - except now we know about context....
    - standards across devices
  • - clients not wanting to spend money on mobile
    - mobile an ‘add-on’ much like other social applications on the web
    - not realising the potential or penetration of mobile apps
  • - how do we deal with all this as front-end developers?
  • - front-end and mobile
    - how do our skills fit with these issues?
  • - making it work, no styles
    - functionality + logic
  • - take something working already
    - make it work across browsers, code it with web standards
    - think about interaction + user behaviour
  • - back-end sandwich
    - 1. flat HTML, 2. over to back end developer, 3. front-end browser testing
  • - back-end sandwich
    - 1. flat HTML, 2. over to back end developer, 3. front-end browser testing
  • - back-end sandwich
    - 1. flat HTML, 2. over to back end developer, 3. front-end browser testing
  • - front-end + back-end = rare breed or constrained by larger companies
    - most have one stronger side
  • - implied that back-end developers do all the work
    - design + front-end often seen as a superficial functionality
  • - attractive vs ‘just working’
    - front-end has a lot to do with the ‘attractiveness of a product’
  • - so much crap in the iPhone app space
    - can make or break an iPhone app
    - something that is nice to use, will be successful
  • - Packing App
    - confusing, too many clicks, too many options, no flexibility
    - I would rather use a piece of paper
  • - what are our strengths?
    - how can we apply this later to the mobile world?
  • - mobile world is notorious for thousands of different handsets
    - old handsets can’t field refresh (update the OS)
  • - device fragmentation - 10x worse than browser issues
    - getting better with new phones, still terrible though
  • - future devices will run on HTML, CSS + JavaScript based OS
  • - voice control on iPhone
    - SMS for deaf or video calls (Hutch)
    - different way to learn and interact with each other
  • - IA: one page model vs deep linking
    - usability: context of the mobile
    - ‘would I rather use a piece of paper?’
  • - important for mobile
    - means we can maintain the single page model for web apps
  • - finding your app once it’s out there?
    - do you just depend on the Apple Store?
    - many don’t think about this...
  • - only versions of Webkit per phone / device
    - many variations still...
  • - much like device fragmentation
    - regressions are fairly common (dropping previously supported features)
  • - different versions of webkit
    - not as bad as device fragmentation
    - but, Webkit is not the silver bullet
  • - Alex Russell
    - more to catch up on, no IE holding it back, faster hardware cycles (1-2 years)
  • - CSS3
    - not available in a lot of real life sites (eg. clients might not allow you)
    - but you can do this on the iPhone now
  • - a good tool for front-end developer
    - versatile, ubiquitous, keep your skills up
  • - HTML, CSS, JavaScript
    - supports Blackberry, Android and iPhone
  • - a good tool for front-end developer
    - versatile, ubiquitous, keep your skills up
  • - HTML, CSS, JavaScript
    - supports Blackberry, Android and iPhone
  • - publish content without going through App Store
    - go to JQTouch wiki, tear apart example files...
  • - WebKit is changing things
    - these could be the foundations for mobile
  • - front-end need to know JavaScript more than ever now
    - all frameworks are using JS to a degree
    - helps your programming skills...
  • - Unarmed Javascript
    - JQuery, Prototype
    - get to really understand JavaScript
  • - free app = no support issues
    - come up with an idea that does just one thing
    - pick one device, or one framework
  • - JJ Halans + Next Sydney Ferry app
    - ported it over to iPhone using Titanium - a good simple idea
  • - iphone stuff is task based, simple
    - web is content, selling products of information, can be more complex
  • - front-end? back-end?
    - recognise your weaknesses as well
    - HTML / CSS / JavaScript vs Objective C
  • - can you tackle the iPhone SDK? or stick to other frameworks...
  • - TextMate + JQTouch is all you need...
    - or play with PhoneGap or Titanium?
  • - one platform is not long term thinking...
  • - soon the mobile web won’t be so awkward
    - start exploring it now so you can take advantage later
  • Transcript

    • 1. Entering the Mobile Space Scott Gledhill
    • 2. personas of the web http://www. ickr.com/photos/sprae/
    • 3. personas of mobile?
    • 4. imode
    • 5. the mobile web sucked
    • 6. Brian Fling
    • 7. Brian Fling web standards in mobile
    • 8. Brian Fling web standards in mobile design for mobile context
    • 9. Brian Fling web standards in mobile design for mobile context merge web 2.0 + mobile 2.0
    • 10. Garret Murray
    • 11. Garret Murray iPhone SDK
    • 12. Garret Murray iPhone SDK native iPhone app
    • 13. Dave Kaneda
    • 14. Dave Kaneda mobile web framework
    • 15. Dave Kaneda mobile web framework jQuery plugin
    • 16. Dave Kaneda mobile web framework jQuery plugin cross platform development (WebKit)
    • 17. it’s all new http://www. ickr.com/photos/joshlewis/
    • 18. new numbers
    • 19. 3.6 billion people own or have access to mobiles
    • 20. 3.6 billion people own or have access to mobiles 1.6 billion of these have access to the web
    • 21. 3.6 billion people own or have access to mobiles 1.6 billion of these have access to the web (only 1.1 billion have access to internet connected desktops)
    • 22. Generation Y http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 23. Generation Y 94% own a mobile phone http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 24. Generation Y 94% own a mobile phone 97% own a computer http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 25. Generation Y 94% own a mobile phone 97% own a computer 56% own an ipod http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 26. Generation Y 94% own a mobile phone 97% own a computer 56% own an ipod they are multitaskers http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 27. Generation Y 94% own a mobile phone 97% own a computer 56% own an ipod they are multitaskers Generation Z http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 28. Generation Y 94% own a mobile phone 97% own a computer 56% own an ipod they are multitaskers Generation Z born in the modern digital age http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 29. Generation Y 94% own a mobile phone 97% own a computer 56% own an ipod they are multitaskers Generation Z born in the modern digital age technology is infused at birth http://www. ickr.com/photos/ xe/
    • 30. In less than ve years, the mobile generation (y+z) could have more buying power than all other demographics combined.
    • 31. new ecosystems
    • 32. Services Applications Application Frameworks Operating Systems Platforms Devices Aggregators Networks Operators
    • 33. Services Applications Application Frameworks
    • 34. Services Applications Application Frameworks
    • 35. Services Applications Application Frameworks
    • 36. new context
    • 37. http://www. ickr.com/photos/totalaldo/
    • 38. where are you?
    • 39. task based
    • 40. in between time
    • 41. new challenges
    • 42. some apps should be rejected
    • 43. Nine Inch Nails objectionable content
    • 44. Nine Inch Nails objectionable content South Park objectionable content
    • 45. Nine Inch Nails objectionable content South Park objectionable content Fracture user ‘confusion’
    • 46. Nine Inch Nails objectionable content South Park objectionable content Fracture user ‘confusion’ Knife Music Ebook objectionable content
    • 47. Nine Inch Nails objectionable content South Park objectionable content Fracture user ‘confusion’ Knife Music Ebook objectionable content Eucalyptus access to the Kama Sutra, later unbanned
    • 48. Nine Inch Nails objectionable content South Park objectionable content Fracture user ‘confusion’ Knife Music Ebook objectionable content Eucalyptus access to the Kama Sutra, later unbanned Chinese Translation objectionable content
    • 49. what about updates?
    • 50. App Store Complaint #23,493 Today, after 15 days, Ego version 1.4.2 was rejected due to an HIG violation. It was a simple violation and I fixed and resubmitted immediately. While it’s frustrating to be rejected, what makes this so much worse is that it took 15 days. That’s half a month. Now that I’ve resubmitted I’m at the back of the line again, and it could easily take another 15 days to be approved (or rejected yet again), which would make the process for getting a simple bugfix point release approved and into customers’ hands take a full month. That is absurd. Here’s the note I sent back to the Apple App Review team, which I also CCd to the Developer Technical Support team: Follow-up: 83060940 I have modified the application and resubmitted. That said, I would like to say I’m extremely frustrated by the fact that it took Apple 15 DAYS to reject my application and now that I’ve resubmitted could take another 15 days to be approved. That’s 30 days to get a bugfix build through, which is DESTROYING my business with this application. Please, I’m begging you, PLEASE don’t take another 15 days on this. My sales are suffering and bad reviews are pouring in because I can’t get a bug fixed for my users. This makes me look terrible. 30 days to approve a point release is insanity. I’M BEGGING YOU. Just when I start to get comfortable with the App Store again, shit like this happens. I understand Apple is completely inundated with updates and applications, but that’s not my problem. If you’re going to set up a system with this many requirements, you’d damned well better be able to handle it efficiently. 30 days to approve a simple update is not efficient. http://log.maniacalrage.net/
    • 51. “ Today, after 15 days, Ego version App Store Complaint #23,493 Today, after 15 days, Ego version 1.4.2 was rejected due to an HIG violation. It was a 1.4.2 was rejected... That’s half a simple violation and I fixed and resubmitted immediately. While it’s frustrating to be rejected, what makes this so much worse is that it took 15 days. That’s half a month. month. Now that I’ve resubmitted I’m at the back of the line again, and it could easily take ” another 15 days to be approved (or rejected yet again), which would make the process for getting a simple bugfix point release approved and into customers’ hands take a full month. That is absurd. Here’s the note I sent back to the Apple App Review team, which I also CCd to the Developer Technical Support team: Follow-up: 83060940 I have modified the application and resubmitted. That said, I would like to say I’m extremely frustrated by the fact that it took Apple 15 DAYS to reject my application and now that I’ve resubmitted could take another 15 days to be approved. That’s 30 days to get a bugfix build through, which is DESTROYING my business with this application. Please, I’m begging you, PLEASE don’t take another 15 days on this. My sales are suffering and bad reviews are pouring in because I can’t get a bug fixed for my users. This makes me look terrible. 30 days to approve a point release is insanity. I’M BEGGING YOU. Just when I start to get comfortable with the App Store again, shit like this happens. I understand Apple is completely inundated with updates and applications, but that’s not my problem. If you’re going to set up a system with this many requirements, you’d damned well better be able to handle it efficiently. 30 days to approve a simple update is not efficient.
    • 52. “ ...now that I’ve resubmitted could App Store Complaint #23,493 Today, after 15 days, Ego version 1.4.2 was rejected due to an HIG violation. It was a take another 15 days to be simple violation and I fixed and resubmitted immediately. While it’s frustrating to be rejected, what makes this so much worse is that it took 15 days. That’s half a month. approved. Now that I’ve resubmitted I’m at the back of the line again, and it could easily take ” another 15 days to be approved (or rejected yet again), which would make the process for getting a simple bugfix point release approved and into customers’ hands take a full month. That is absurd. Here’s the note I sent back to the Apple App Review team, which I also CCd to the Developer Technical Support team: Follow-up: 83060940 I have modified the application and resubmitted. That said, I would like to say I’m extremely frustrated by the fact that it took Apple 15 DAYS to reject my application and now that I’ve resubmitted could take another 15 days to be approved. That’s 30 days to get a bugfix build through, which is DESTROYING my business with this application. Please, I’m begging you, PLEASE don’t take another 15 days on this. My sales are suffering and bad reviews are pouring in because I can’t get a bug fixed for my users. This makes me look terrible. 30 days to approve a point release is insanity. I’M BEGGING YOU. Just when I start to get comfortable with the App Store again, shit like this happens. I understand Apple is completely inundated with updates and applications, but that’s not my problem. If you’re going to set up a system with this many requirements, you’d damned well better be able to handle it efficiently. 30 days to approve a simple update is not efficient.
    • 53. “ ... 30 days to get a bug fix build App Store Complaint #23,493 through, which is DESTROYING Today, after 15 days, Ego version 1.4.2 was rejected due to an HIG violation. It was a simple violation and I fixed and resubmitted immediately. While it’s frustrating to be my business with this rejected, what makes this so much worse is that it took 15 days. That’s half a month. Now that I’ve resubmitted I’m at the back of the line again, and it could easily take ” another 15 days to be approved (or rejected yet again), which would make the process application. for getting a simple bugfix point release approved and into customers’ hands take a full month. That is absurd. Here’s the note I sent back to the Apple App Review team, which I also CCd to the Developer Technical Support team: Follow-up: 83060940 I have modified the application and resubmitted. That said, I would like to say I’m extremely frustrated by the fact that it took Apple 15 DAYS to reject my application and now that I’ve resubmitted could take another 15 days to be approved. That’s 30 days to get a bugfix build through, which is DESTROYING my business with this application. Please, I’m begging you, PLEASE don’t take another 15 days on this. My sales are suffering and bad reviews are pouring in because I can’t get a bug fixed for my users. This makes me look terrible. 30 days to approve a point release is insanity. I’M BEGGING YOU. Just when I start to get comfortable with the App Store again, shit like this happens. I understand Apple is completely inundated with updates and applications, but that’s not my problem. If you’re going to set up a system with this many requirements, you’d damned well better be able to handle it efficiently. 30 days to approve a simple update is not efficient.
    • 54. http://www. ickr.com/photos/kentsmudger/
    • 55. “ ... are we all reduced to building moronic fart and burp applications for the iTunes store and selling ” them for 99 cents? - another pissed off Apple developer
    • 56. ... but, Apple have change the mobile space
    • 57. ... but, Apple have change the mobile space improved interaction and UI
    • 58. ... but, Apple have change the mobile space improved interaction and UI a better mobile web
    • 59. ... but, Apple have change the mobile space improved interaction and UI a better mobile web more than phones
    • 60. ... but, Apple have change the mobile space improved interaction and UI a better mobile web more than phones more control for the users (reviews)
    • 61. ... but, Apple have change the mobile space improved interaction and UI a better mobile web more than phones more control for the users (reviews) more control for developers (app store)
    • 62. new devices
    • 63. iPhone
    • 64. palm pre
    • 65. blackberry
    • 66. android
    • 67. feature phones
    • 68. new people
    • 69. www. ickr.com/photos/mobilemondaysydney/274233304/
    • 70. mobile 2.0 hype
    • 71. mobile 2.0 for the client?
    • 72. mobile 2.0 for the client?
    • 73. front-end + mobile http://www. ickr.com/photos/wasteofspace/
    • 74. http://www. ickr.com/photos/bingramos/
    • 75. front-end http://www. ickr.com/photos/bingramos/
    • 76. front-end back-end http://www. ickr.com/photos/bingramos/
    • 77. front-end back-end front-end http://www. ickr.com/photos/bingramos/
    • 78. http://www.slideshare.net/stephenpa/eye-candy-is-a-critical-business-requirement
    • 79. http://www.slideshare.net/stephenpa/eye-candy-is-a-critical-business-requirement
    • 80. attractive apps will be more successful
    • 81. confusing apps will fail
    • 82. progressive enhancement
    • 83. device fragmentation
    • 84. progressive enhancement web standards
    • 85. progressive enhancement web standards accessibility
    • 86. progressive enhancement web standards accessibility IA and usability
    • 87. progressive enhancement web standards accessibility IA and usability interaction design (JS / Ajax)
    • 88. progressive enhancement web standards accessibility IA and usability interaction design (JS / Ajax) ndability
    • 89. WebKit
    • 90. “ There is no WebKit in mobile... - PPK ”
    • 91. http://www.quirksmode.org/webkit.html
    • 92. “ ... top 4 of all WebKits tested is ” Iphone 3.1 - PPK
    • 93. mobile browsers will progress faster than desktop browsers
    • 94. @font-face Lorem ipsum dolor sit auctor dui. Nunc ut leo augue accumsan amet, consectetuer vel magna adipiscing augue. Quisque ut eros adipiscing elit. Aenean tempor. Donec at erat ultrices sodales. egestas blandit ipsum. pretium, ligula et Nunc vitae ipsum. Morbi nulla metus, hendrerit faucibus, sem Mauris in elit in dolor luctus et, ullamcorper velit accumsan tortor, imperdiet interdum. sit amet, commodo sodales tempor est Vivamus egestas quis, nisl. Ut blandit ligula non velit. Nulla s a gi t t i s j u s to. S e d lacus nec nibh. sagittis, odio quis porta lorem. Sed vel neque in Phasellus eleifend nonummy, mauris arcu ipsum gravida enim et risus. Nam grav i d a o d i o, q u i s nonummy. Nulla condimentum. aliquam lacus elit non tempor blandit elit. Praesent euismod libero. Proin aliquam yellow box with shadows... ooooooh yeah!
    • 95. tools for mobile
    • 96. “ Learning Objective-C is great, if only for the historical obscurity of it.” ” - Brian LeRoux, PhoneGap
    • 97. PhoneGap
    • 98. Titanium
    • 99. JQTouch
    • 100. keep it on the mobile web http://code.google.com/p/jqtouch/wiki/PoweredBy
    • 101. are frameworks good for me?
    • 102. are frameworks good for me? proof of concept
    • 103. are frameworks good for me? proof of concept work quickly in a language you know
    • 104. are frameworks good for me? proof of concept work quickly in a language you know do you need to target a speci c device?
    • 105. are frameworks good for me? proof of concept work quickly in a language you know do you need to target a speci c device? do you need to target native functionality?
    • 106. entering the mobile space http://www. ickr.com/photos/fcb/
    • 107. Are HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, XML and APIs the universal language for everything?
    • 108. learn JavaScript
    • 109. start simple and free
    • 110. http://nextsydneyferry.com/app/
    • 111. know your strengths
    • 112. nd a good tool
    • 113. explore the mobile web
    • 114. “ Making an application for a single platform is not a strategy, it’s an ” opportunity... - Brian Fling
    • 115. HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript, XML and APIs are the universal language for everything.
    • 116. a good teacher teaches the student that they already know they answer.
    • 117. we are already designing for the web of tomorrow.
    • 118. http://www.moltn.com/blog/entering-the-mobile-space Other credits: http://www. ickr.com/photos/ericrice/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/jorges ickr/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/mkeefe/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/wonderlane/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/sloth_rider/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/jessicafm/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/batega/ http://www. ickr.com/photos/helgabj/