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The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia
 

The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia

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The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia. Presented by D. Layne Coppock (Utah State University) at the GL-CRSP "End of ...

The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia. Presented by D. Layne Coppock (Utah State University) at the GL-CRSP "End of Program Conference" on June 18, 2009, Naivasha, Kenya.

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    The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia The Quest for Impact: The Transformation of Research from a Traditional to a Participatory Format in Southern Ethiopia Presentation Transcript

    • The Quest for Impact: From Traditional to Participatory Research in Ethiopia Layne Coppock PARIMA Project, GL-CRSP Closing Conference Naivasha, Kenya, 2009
    • Roadmap  Background  Example from Southern Ethiopia  What Have I Learned?  Academics/scholarship  Sustainability  Role of Livestock CRSP
    • Impact Assumptions  Proper problem diagnosis  Lack of other systemic constraints  Effectiveness of extension
    • Researched Topics, 1985-99  Pastoral livelihoods (trends, diversification prospects)  Descriptive rangeland ecology  Trials: Options to improve calf growth  Trials: Options to improve forages  Trials: Options to improve milk processing
    • Does any of this matter?
    • Shift in Approach, 2000-09  PRA (joint problem diagnosis)  Peer-to-peer learning/Cross-border diffusion  Action Research (monitoring/problem solving)  Structured survey (groups vs. non-groups)
    • Participatory Rural Appraisal
    • PRA Results, 2000  Results from several Boran communities were remarkably similar  Lack of food and water seen as the primary problem  Locally sustainable solutions focused on education, diversified livelihoods
    • Data from Kenya Groups  16 group leaders interviewed  Avg group age = 10 years  Avg charter members = 24 (no men)  Avg illiteracy = 85%  Half of groups formed spontaneously  Detailed constitutions, by-laws (memorized)  Savings; livelihood diversification; publ. services  High success rates; internal/external challenges
    • Group Formation Back in Ethiopia  60 collective-action groups quickly formed between 2001 to 2003  2,167 charter members; 76% women  Capacity building short-courses (including micro-finance) were implemented  Action research added as a monitoring tool
    • Livestock Marketing  Groups wanted stronger links to markets  PARIMA used participatory processes to help create a new value chain from pastoral producers to livestock exporters in Addis Ababa  This coincided with favorable changes in markets and institutions in Ethiopia
    • Group Micro-finance Statistics (June 2008)  60 groups, 2001-2008 (not one has failed)  Savings mobilized = $92,735  Number of micro-loans = 5,368  Repayment rate = 96%  Volume of loan value = $647,666  Loan interest generated = $29,729  Profits from small business = $25,614*  Grew to 2,300 group members; over 13,800 direct beneficiaries
    • Small Ruminant Market Supply, 2003-05  11 groups monitored, 289 members total  Average capitalization of US $3,136  Average head traded per group 2,330  Average profit: US $333 to US $1,111
    • Innovation System: Stakeholders  International members: 3  Regional members: 12  Local members: 31
    • Capacity-Building Cost Estimation  Selective inputs for 13,800 beneficiaries  PRAs/CAPs = $0.52 (4% of population)  Short courses = $4.03 (3%...)  Tours = $4.63 (9%...)  NF Educ = $0.99 (16%...)  Seed loans = $9.96 (17%...)  Mon & Eval = $14.16 Total = $34.29 over 3 years
    • Effects of Intervention  Compared to paired controls in 2 locations, collective action improves:  Personal skills and confidence (P<0.001)  Level of social support (P<0.001)  Cash income and access to credit (P<0.001)  Personal quality of life (P<0.01)
    • What Have I Learned?  Traditional vs. participatory work in the context of “the academy”  Sustainability and stakeholder turnover  Responsibility to human subjects
    • Participation Checklist:  Benefits  Costs  Local impacts  Transaction efforts  Empirical evidence for  More time and money interventions  Harder to generalize  Satisfaction from results, publish? observing research application  Risk of “losing control”
    • Emerging Voices  “Research for development”  “Participation, problem-solving, sustainability science”  “Integration and implementation science”  “Innovation systems, new forms of knowledge”  “Post-normal science”
    • Scholarship Assessed (Glassick et al. 1997)  Scholarship transition beyond “discovery” to include verifiable links to integration, application, teaching…  Is higher ed a private benefit to individuals, or an investment in a collective public good?  What scholarship “matters,” and how do scholars work?  Need for stronger societal engagement  Scholarship ideals: integrity, perseverance, courage
    • “First, he wants to know where you will publish”
    • Hans Jahnke (1982): “building human capacity is the main way to achieve development impact on marginal lands…”
    • Role for Livestock CRSP? Emphasize:  Discovery, integration, application  Authentic partnerships, sustainability  Longer-term funding horizons  Supporting “global institutional memory”
    • This research was made possible through support provided to the Global Livestock Collaborative Research Support Program by the United States Agency for International Development under terms of Grant No. PCE-G-00-98-00036-00 and by contributions of participating institutions.