The Realities of Life: education for
global citizenship
ANZNet Formation to Mission Conference
Educating Minds, Opening He...
We ourselves who have to do with
children must first appreciate the realities
of life before we can communicate this
under...
...we cannot fully understand life today in our own communities
unless we set this in the wider global context.
What happe...
One of the tasks of the progressive educator,
according to Paulo Freire, is to unveil
opportunities for hope, no matter wh...
Global Citizenship Skills for the 21st
Century

The concept of multidimensional citizenship highlighted in The
Citizenship...
Global Citizenship Skills for the
21st Century
1. The ability to examine and tackle problems as
members of a global societ...
So what does global education
look like?

(Retrieved from Hicks and Holden, 2007:29)
For Edmund O‟Sullivan, global
education provides the
necessary, radical change in
perspective within educational
instituti...
Global Perspectives:
a framework for global education.
The Framework

The framework for global
education outlines the
values, knowledge, skills
, and opportunities for
action wi...
To some, making a commitment to
social justice means that we must
add a whole new program to an
already to an already over...
The Melbourne Declaration on
Educational Goals for young
Australians
Global integration and
international mobility have
in...
Goal 2: All young Australians become successful
learners, confident and creative individuals, active
and informed citizens...
The Australian Curriculum
P-10
• English, Mathematics Science, History
• Geography, Languages, The Arts
• Health and Physi...
Cross-Curriculum Priorities
– Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Histories and Cultures

– Asia and Australia’s Engagem...
General Capabilities
How is global education best taught in the
classroom?
What type of pedagogy should be used?
Any understanding of the conte...
Teaching and Learning Processes

(Quittner and Sturak, 2008:22-23)
The realities of life… they are best learned in the
actual doing from those who know how to do them…
the human voice and h...
What resources are available to
help me develop the global citizen
in my classroom???
International Women‟s Day
8 March 2014
“Equality for women is progress for all”.
Empowering Women and Girls
• Women work around two–thirds of the world’s
working hours, produce half the world’s food, ear...
Global Learning in Poetry
(World Poetry Day: 21st March)

• What is the poem about?
• What type of character is in the poe...
Natalie Stewart (“the Floacist”) was formerly one half of „Floetry‟.
With Marsha Ambrosius (“the Songstress”) Stewart reco...
Global Learning Centre
Digital/Online Resources

Scoop.It!

Tumblr

Pinterest

Facebook

Global Learning
Centre

Twitter
References
Cogan, John and Ray Derricott. 2000. Citizenship for the 21st Century: An International
Perspective on Educatio...
Contact Us
102 MacDonald Road
Windsor
Ph: 3857 6666
Fax: 3857 6655
Email: glc@glc.edu.au
Website: www.glc.edu.au

Alisa
al...
Stuartholme conference friday march 7, 2014 2
Stuartholme conference friday march 7, 2014 2
Stuartholme conference friday march 7, 2014 2
Stuartholme conference friday march 7, 2014 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Stuartholme conference friday march 7, 2014 2

787 views
640 views

Published on

The Realities of Life: education for global citizenship

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
787
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
484
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • ‘Thosethings that have to be learned in order to live and which lesson books do not teach. Things to be done, and things to be made and things to be ordered and controlled. The dignity of manual labour. Domestic duties: needle work, cooking etc’ (page 91-94).
  • David Hicks was formerly Professor in the School of Education, Bath Spa University, where he helped develop and taught on the undergraduate Education Studies degree. He is now a freelance educator with a particular interest in education for sustainability, climate change and the shift to a post-carbon future. For the last twenty years his research, writing and teaching have focused on ways of helping students and teachers think more critically and creatively about sustainable futures. His latest book, due out in 2014, is Education for Hope in Troubled Times: Climate change, peak oil and the transition to a post-carbon future.Cathie Holden is Associate Professor at the University of Exeter, UK, where she trains both primary and secondary teachers. Traditionally 3 scenarios , Hicks added the 4th. Fuzzy, lacks conceptual clarity, only to do with generally learning about the world, Uncritical both about social and political formations and appropriate pedagogical procedures for exploring the world. Thus ‘popular’ form of global education where any reference to the wider world is somehow taken to be a good thing.Critical of self: Focuses on personal growth and understanding as its mean outcome . Focus for educators who want to explore the world today but particularly in a child-centered way. Stresses the importance of developing self-esteem and cooperative skills, often pays much less attention to the use of critical thinking skills in a local and global context. Critical of Society: Focus critical understanding of social and political issues and the development of pedagogy which challenges dominant neo-liberal ideology and market driven forms of education. May fail to pay attention to the personal and social skills needed for the development of self-esteem and empathy.Holistic Scenario: Draws on 2 and 3 and argues that education needs to be about changing both self and society. In doing so it embraces personal and political change equally , aiming at self -actualization of the individual but embedded within the context of a socially and environmentally responsible local and global citizenship. (Hicks and Holden: 2007:29)
  • The Transformative Learning Centre is based at the Ontario Institute forStudies in Education of the University of Toronto (OISE/UT).Edmund O'SullivanEdmund O’Sullivan is a Professor of Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto. He is Director of the Transformative Learning Centre that does both research and graduate programs on ecological issues. The Centre emphasises a global-planetary vision combining ecological literacy, social justice and human rights concerns, with diversity education that deals with issues of race, gender, class, and sexual orientation. Its goal is to help sustain a vision in education that has a global planetary consciousness and which creates a critical approach to global market visions of education. Ed has been a Professor at the OISE for 32 years and has taught courses in child development, educational psychology, critical mass media studies, critical pedagogy and cultural studies and presently heads up the program for Transformative Learning. He is the author of eight books and has over a hundred articles, chapters in books and refereed journals. His latest books are Critical Psychology and Critical Pedagogy and most recently Transformative Learning: Building Educational Vision for the 21st Century. Ed has also been honoured in his teaching work when he received The OCUFA Teaching Award for Excellence in Teaching at the University Level.
  • 4. A Social Awareness that Impels to Action
Stuartholme School acknowledges the importance of the School body being actively engaged with the wider community.  An understanding of issues surrounding social justice from local, national and international perspectives is encouraged through our active outreach programme(website).
  • http://data.worldbank.org/topic/gender#boxes-box-topic_cust_sec
  • https://iamachild.wordpress.com/2011/02/22/hermann-knopf-1870-1928-austrian/
  • Stuartholme conference friday march 7, 2014 2

    1. 1. The Realities of Life: education for global citizenship ANZNet Formation to Mission Conference Educating Minds, Opening Hearts, Transforming Lives Friday 7 - Saturday 8 March 2014, Stuartholme School Alisa Cleary- Education Consultant
    2. 2. We ourselves who have to do with children must first appreciate the realities of life before we can communicate this understanding to others or give the right spirit to those we teach. (Janet Erskine Stuart, 1912/2000:81) Young Girl Doing Needle Work, Hermann Kopf, 18701928.
    3. 3. ...we cannot fully understand life today in our own communities unless we set this in the wider global context. What happens elsewhere in the world constantly impacts on our daily lives whether this is international finance, food, fashion, crime, the weather or popular music. (Hicks and Holden, 2007:4)
    4. 4. One of the tasks of the progressive educator, according to Paulo Freire, is to unveil opportunities for hope, no matter what the obstacles might be (1994:9).
    5. 5. Global Citizenship Skills for the 21st Century The concept of multidimensional citizenship highlighted in The Citizenship Education Policy Study (Cogan and Derricott, 2000). This four-year study sought the opinions of 182 policy experts across nine nations from a range of fields including politics, industry, science, health and education to determine their perspective on: (a) emerging global trends likely to impact people‟s lives up to the year 2020; (b) the citizenship characteristics required to cope with and/or manage the impact of these trends; and (c) the implications of this for educational policy particularly in regard to citizenship education.
    6. 6. Global Citizenship Skills for the 21st Century 1. The ability to examine and tackle problems as members of a global society. 2. The ability to work with others in a cooperative way taking responsibility for your role in society. 3. The ability to understand and accept cultural differences. 4. The ability to think in a critical and systematic way. 5. Being willing to resolve conflict in a non-violent way. 6. Being willing to change your lifestyle and habits to benefit the environment. 7. The ability to appreciate and defend human rights. 8. Being willing and able to participate in politics at local, national and global levels. (Cogan and Derricott, 2000)
    7. 7. So what does global education look like? (Retrieved from Hicks and Holden, 2007:29)
    8. 8. For Edmund O‟Sullivan, global education provides the necessary, radical change in perspective within educational institutions to deal with the magnitude of the problems that we are currently facing at a planetary level (1991:65). Transformative learning involves experiencing a deep, structural shift in the basic premises of thought, feeling, and actions. It is a shift of consciousness that dramatically and permanently alters our way of being in the world. (O‟Sullivan, 2002:11).
    9. 9. Global Perspectives: a framework for global education.
    10. 10. The Framework The framework for global education outlines the values, knowledge, skills , and opportunities for action within five interconnected learning emphases and their encompassing spatial and temporal dimensions. (Quittner and Sturak, 2008:5)
    11. 11. To some, making a commitment to social justice means that we must add a whole new program to an already to an already overcrowded curriculum. We need not choose between academic achievement and a positive school climate as though these were incompatible or antagonistic goals. In reality, however, there are teachable moments for social justice everywhere, and a teacher who is primed and committed to noticing and responding to such moments can infuse values about belonging, right treatment, and justice throughout the day (Sapon- Shevin, 2010:4).
    12. 12. The Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for young Australians Global integration and international mobility have increased rapidly in the last decade. As a consequence, new and exciting opportunities for Australians are emerging. This heightens the need to nurture an appreciation of and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity, and a sense of global citizenship. (2008:Preamble)
    13. 13. Goal 2: All young Australians become successful learners, confident and creative individuals, active and informed citizens (2008: 8-9)
    14. 14. The Australian Curriculum P-10 • English, Mathematics Science, History • Geography, Languages, The Arts • Health and Physical Education, Design and Technology, Economics/Business/Civics and Citizenship
    15. 15. Cross-Curriculum Priorities – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Histories and Cultures – Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia – Sustainability
    16. 16. General Capabilities
    17. 17. How is global education best taught in the classroom? What type of pedagogy should be used? Any understanding of the contemporary world needs to be based in: • participatory and experiential ways of teaching and learning, • involve the head and heart (cognitive and affective) and • the personal and political (values clarification and political literacy). It needs to draw on the learner‟s direct or simulated experience and it requires the development of; interpersonal, discussion and critical thinking skills, as well as skills of participation and action. (Hicks and Holden, 2007:27)
    18. 18. Teaching and Learning Processes (Quittner and Sturak, 2008:22-23)
    19. 19. The realities of life… they are best learned in the actual doing from those who know how to do them… the human voice and hand go much further in making knowledge acceptable than the textbook with diagrams. (Janet Erskine Stuart, 1912/2000:81) (Retrieved from: http://www.stuartholme.com)
    20. 20. What resources are available to help me develop the global citizen in my classroom???
    21. 21. International Women‟s Day 8 March 2014 “Equality for women is progress for all”.
    22. 22. Empowering Women and Girls • Women work around two–thirds of the world’s working hours, produce half the world’s food, earn 10 per cent of the world’s income and own less than 1 per cent of the world’s property • Saudi Arabian women are not allowed to drive • Married women in Iraq, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and Libya require their husband’s written permission to travel • More than two-thirds of the world’s illiterate adults are women • 65 per cent of women in PNG are victims of domestic abuse (some regions 100 per cent) • World Bank estimates that two-fifths of girls are never delivered due to infanticide. (Geographies of Human WellBeing, 2013:7-8)
    23. 23. Global Learning in Poetry (World Poetry Day: 21st March) • What is the poem about? • What type of character is in the poem? • Where might the poem be set? • What global themes might be included in the poem?
    24. 24. Natalie Stewart (“the Floacist”) was formerly one half of „Floetry‟. With Marsha Ambrosius (“the Songstress”) Stewart recorded two studio albums, one live album, and sold over 800,000 records worldwide. (Source: The Poetry Station) Stewart attended Brit School for Performing Arts and Technology and Middlesex University London and later transferred to North London University. (Source: Wikipedia)
    25. 25. Global Learning Centre
    26. 26. Digital/Online Resources Scoop.It! Tumblr Pinterest Facebook Global Learning Centre Twitter
    27. 27. References Cogan, John and Ray Derricott. 2000. Citizenship for the 21st Century: An International Perspective on Education, London: Kegan Paul. Erskine Stuart, Janet. 1912/2000. The Education of Catholics Girls, Australia: Merino Litho. Freire, Paulo. 1994. Pedagogy of Hope: Reliving Pedagogy of the Oppressed, M. B. Ramos (trans.). New York: Continuum. Hicks, David and Catherine Holden, eds. 2007. Teaching the Global Dimension- Key Principles and Effective Practice. London and New York: Routledge. Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (2008). Accessed 28 February 2014. Available at: http://www.mceecdya.edu.au/verve/_resources national_declaration_on_the_educational_goals_for _young_australians.pdf O‟Sullivan, Edmund. 1999. Transformative learning: educational vision for the 21st century. London, New York: Zed Books. O‟Sullivan, Edmund, Amish Morell and Mary O‟Connor, eds. 2002. Expanding the Boundaries of Transformative Learning, 2nd ed. New York: Palgrave. Quittner, Kaye and Katharine Sturak. 2008. Global perspectives: a framework for global education in Australian schools. Melbourne: Curriculum Corporation. Sapon- Shevin, Mara. 2010. Because we can change the world. A practical guide to building cooperative, inclusive classroom communities. Thousand Oaks California: Corwin.
    28. 28. Contact Us 102 MacDonald Road Windsor Ph: 3857 6666 Fax: 3857 6655 Email: glc@glc.edu.au Website: www.glc.edu.au Alisa alisa.cleary@glc.edu.au Karena karena.menzie@glc.edu.au Laura laura.broadbent@glc.edu.au Nena (teacher/librarian) nena.morgante@glc.edu.au

    ×