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Contemporary population Issues Queensland Australia
 

Contemporary population Issues Queensland Australia

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    Contemporary population Issues Queensland Australia Contemporary population Issues Queensland Australia Presentation Transcript

    • Contemporary population issues Alison Taylor Principal DemographerBrisbane seminar14 June 2011 Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Recent releases• Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities: A Sustainable Population Strategy for Australia• Our Cities, Our Future – A National Urban Policy• Budget 2011 – Investing in Regional Australia• Productivity Commission report benchmarking planning, zoning and development assessment Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities: A Sustainable Population Strategy for AustraliaOutlines Government’s vision for a sustainable Australia – Objective is to ensure future changes in Australia’s population are compatible with the sustainability of our economy, communities and the environment Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities: A SustainablePopulation Strategy for Australia Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Sustainable Australia – SustainableCommunities: A Sustainable Population Strategy for Australia cont. • Complements other recent policies – National Urban Policy – Investing in Regional Australia – The Sustainable Communities package and – Reform of Infrastructure Australia • Supports the creation of jobs closer to where people live, to improve amenity, to develop high quality public spaces and to encourage greater interaction in suburban communities Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Sustainable Australia – SustainableCommunities: A Sustainable Population Strategy for Australia cont. Strategy is supported by four new measures • Suburban jobs (planning for employment precincts outside major cities’ CBDs) • Sustainable regional development (greater capacity to undertake strategic environmental impact assessments of high growth regional areas) • Measuring sustainability (a set of national sustainability indicators to chart progress in different communities) and • Promoting regional living (supporting regional communities to promote themselves as places to live and to do business) Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities: A Sustainable Population Strategy for Australia cont.• No population target in favour of “concentrating on ways of improving our wellbeing, protecting our environment and making better use of the resources we have”• Targets would be arbitrary, distracting and impossible to deliver in practice• Strategy seeks to manage impacts of all aspects of current population, closely monitor migration levels and use short and medium term population projections to plan and prepare for population needs in the future Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Sustainable Australia – SustainableCommunities: A Sustainable Population Strategy for Australia cont. The strategy is available for download at www.environment.gov.au/ sustainability/population Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Our Cities, Our Future• Establishes the Government’s objectives and directions for our cities as we prepare for the decades ahead• Is about facilitating better outcomes in our cities through both direct investment and by influencing the actions of others• Applies the principles of the Sustainable Population strategy to the urban context• Recognises major regional centres as well as capital cities Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Investing in Sustainable CommunitiesTargets more effective planning and design of our cities and efficient use of new and existing infrastructure• Part A – Liveable Cities ($20m)• Part B – Suburban Jobs ($100m) Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • National Urban Policy - initiatives• Improve labour and capital productivity• Integrate land use and infrastructure• Improve the efficiency of urban infrastructure• Protect & sustain our natural and built environments• Reduce greenhouse gas emissions and improve air quality• Manage our resources sustainably Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • National Urban Policy – initiatives cont.• Increase resilience to climate change, emergency events and natural hazards• Facilitate the supply of appropriate mixed income housing• Support affordable living choices• Improve accessibility and reduce dependence on private motor vehicles• Support community wellbeing Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • National Urban PolicyThe strategy is available for download at www.infrastructure.gov.au/infrastructure/mcu/urban policy/ Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Investing in Regional Australia• $4.3bn of initiatives to ensure that individuals and communities across regional Australia share in the nation’s prosperity• Strong, resilient and creative regional communities through measures targeting health, education, skills, workforce participation, infrastructure, environmental sustainability and improved delivery of government services Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Investing in Regional AustraliaThe strategy is available fordownload at www.budget.gov.au/2011-12 Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Performance Benchmarking of AustralianBusiness Regulation, Planning, Zoning and Development Assessment report• Released in May 2011, the purpose was to benchmark the states’ and territories’ planning and zoning systems and their land development assessment processes• Considered impact of above on efficiency and effectiveness of the functioning of cities• Covered major and regional cities over 50,000 in population Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Performance benchmarks • SEQ (and Perth) in 2009-10 had among the highest supplies of greenfield land zoned for residential and land with subdivision approval (relative to population). • However, Qld and WA appear to have significant housing shortfalls due to the more rapid growth Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Community engagement• 21% of Qld’s capital city community agreed State government is effective in planning (2nd highest after WA 22%)• 17% agreed local governments are effective in planning (3rd highest after WA and Tas)• 11% of community considered consultation to occur often• 8% of community considered that government cares for their planning preferences Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Travel time to work, capital cities 40 Median travel time peak hour (minutes) 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Sydney Canberra Melbourne Brisbane Perth Adelaide Hobart Darwin Sydney Canberra Melbourne Brisbane Perth Adelaide Hobart DarwinSource: Productivity Commission, 2011,Performance Benchmarking of AustralianBusiness Regulation: Planning, Zoning andDevelopment Assessments Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Travel time to work, Queensland LGAs 45 Median travel time peak hour (minutes) Brisbane Total 40 Moreton Bay 35 Ipswich 30 Logan Redland 25 Somerset 20 Scenic Rim 15 Brisbane City Lockyer Valley 10 Gold Coast 5 Cairns Sunshine Coast 0 lle ba So and Towoomba Re n ich ne ns st e t tal y rV y t isb Rim en et y To o as ga Ba t G alle oa vi Ci Sc ers ir m To sw ns dl Ca Lo oo C C on Lo ane ic Townsville m Ip e w d w an To ye ol or hi isb ck ns M Br BrSource: Productivity Commission, 2011, SuPerformance Benchmarking of AustralianBusiness Regulation: Planning, Zoning andDevelopment Assessments Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Community attitudes to population growthAcross all 24 cities surveyed:• 12% said they would like an increase in population• 51% said they would not like the population in their community to increase• People in capital cities were less in favour of increases than people in other cities• 29% said they did not care about population change in their community• People in Sydney, Sunshine Coast and Geelong were most likely to not want the population to increase (64%, 59% and 57%) Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Dissatisfaction of communities“One explanation for the apparent dissatisfaction of communities with planning of their governments may be the substantial disjunction in planning priorities. Communities identified personal safety, public transport and congestion as their top planning priorities in the community survey. Most governments reported accommodating higher population growth, transitioning to higher population densities through greater infill and managing greenfield development to be their top priorities.” The report is available for download at http://www.pc.gov.au Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • New UN projections released• World population to reach 10.1bn by 2100 – Much of increase in 39 high fertility countries in Africa, Asia, Oceania and Latin America• Last year, 6.89bn, expected 7bn by Oct 2011 (doubled in last 50 years)• Fewer people are dying young and some countries have relatively high fertility• Leads to stress on natural resources, particularly food and water The report is available for download at http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/ Office of Economic and Statistical Research
    • Queensland TreasuryOffice of Economic and Statistical ResearchDemography and PlanningPO Box 15037 City East Qld 4002 Australiatel +61 7 3224 5326fax +61 7 3227 7437www.oesr.qld.gov.au Office of Economic and Statistical Research