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Unit 1 lesson 1 What is Science
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Unit 1 lesson 1 What is Science

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    Unit 1 lesson 1 What is Science Unit 1 lesson 1 What is Science Presentation Transcript

    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? What All Scientists Do Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Science is the study of the natural world through careful observation and investigation. There are many branches of science. • Scientists use investigations to try to explain how and why things in the natural world happen. • Investigations are procedures carried out to observe, study, or test something.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? What All Scientists Do Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • All scientists observe by using their five senses to collect information. • All scientists compare by finding ways objects and events are similar and different. • Scientists must think critically about the results of their investigations to learn more about the natural world.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Prove It! Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Scientists collect evidence, or information, to explain observations during a scientific investigation. • Evidence can be direct. A fossil of a dinosaur skull is direct evidence that dinosaurs once lived. • Evidence can be indirect. A fossil of a dinosaur footprint is indirect evidence of dinosaurs.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Prove It! Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Here is an example of a scientist collecting evidence: • In the 1660s, a scientist named Dr. Francesco Redi designed an experiment on maggots. • At that time, most people thought maggots grew out of rotting meat.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Prove It! Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Redi put fresh meat in two jars. He covered one jar with cloth and left the other jar uncovered.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Prove It! Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • He observed the meat over many days. • He saw that flies landed on the meat in the uncovered jar. No flies landed on the meat in the covered jar.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Prove It! Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Soon, there were maggots on the meat in the uncovered jar. There were no maggots on the meat in the covered jar.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Prove It! Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Redi repeated the experiment many times. • Each time, he observed the same thing: Maggots grew on meat that flies landed on, but no maggots appeared on meat with no flies. • He concluded that maggots come from eggs that flies lay.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Prove It! Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Which jar would the meat in the image below have been in?
    • A Sticky Trap Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company How to Draw Conclusions • Scientists repeat investigations over and over to draw conclusions. The conclusions are always based on evidence. • A scientist uses inferences to draw conclusions based on evidence. • Scientists do not use feelings or opinions to draw conclusions. Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science?
    • Opinion or Evidence? • Opinions are beliefs or judgments. Scientists do not use opinions to draw conclusions. • Personal feelings and opinions should not affect how you do investigations or your conclusions. • You should not ignore evidence, even if you do not like what it means. Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science?
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Knowledge Grows Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Scientists communicate, or share, the results of investigations. • Other scientists can repeat the investigations and compare the results. • Scientific knowledge grows as scientists expand on one another’s ideas.
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Meet Scientists Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Many people work as many different types of scientists. • Astronomers: study how the universe works, using time and space relationships to investigate it • Botanists: investigate questions about plants, such as how environmental conditions impact the plant cycle • Taxonomists: identify and classify living things into categories based on specific characteristics
    • Unit 1 Lesson 1 What Is Science? Meet Scientists Copyright © Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company • Scientists may need to place objects or events in order. They may also need to classify objects or events based on specific characteristics. • How do you know the order, or correct sequence, for the images below?