Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Open Textbook Models: View from the Library
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Open Textbook Models: View from the Library

604
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
604
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Initially we started looking at this issue and it felt a lot like a typical scholarly communication problem from the library perspective – very little power in influencing selection, guiding pedagogy, or directing action on behalf of the faculty and university and not consuming the content and it has the issue of intermediation between decision-maker and consumer resulting in price inelasticity – even worse – we were not even making the purchasing decisions and negotiating prices.
  • Later I realized that is not completely the case for a couple of reasons:
    Dissatisfaction is more wide-spread – less dependence on current system for things like rewards, promotion, tenure.
    Multiple players are concerned about cost of textbooks – parents, students, and in some cases instructors/professors – new private entrants.
    Makes it a more ripe area to advocate for changes and alternatives.
    Background: UNC System mandate to reduce textbook costs
  • Advocacy – “soft marketing” - we developed expertise , built a simple web site, and provided one-on-one consultations.
    Faculty read site and that led to further conversations about options for textbooks.
  • Textbook rentals increased 300% in last 12 months . Students can save Students can save as much as 50% to 75% by renting, keeps more $$ in students’ pockets.
    *Many schools have started in-house textbook rental programs. http://www.eiu.edu/~textbks/
    *Commercial vendor Chegg.com has launched rental kiosks in college stores
    Ebook market - According to the National Association of College Stores, digital books make up just under 3 percent of textbook sales, although the association expects share to grow to 10 percent to 15 percent by 2012.
    Why is print so popular – ease of highlighting, note taking, sharing and possibility of selling book back at the end of the year.
    Customizable textbooks
    Macmillan : DynamicBooks, which will allow college instructors to edit digital editions of textbooks and customize them for their individual classes.
    McGraw Hill Create - ability to easily create custom textbooks using a self-service system
    Open Models with commercial content
    WebAssign content to complement Connexions (Rice U - organized in small modules that are easily connected into larger collections or courses. All content is free to use under CC "attribution" license)
    FlatWorldKnowledge model.
  • Textbook rentals increased 300% in last 12 months . Students can save Students can save as much as 50% to 75% by renting, keeps more $$ in students’ pockets.
    *Many schools have started in-house textbook rental programs. http://www.eiu.edu/~textbks/
    *Commercial vendor Chegg.com has launched rental kiosks in college stores
    Ebook market - According to the National Association of College Stores, digital books make up just under 3 percent of textbook sales, although the association expects share to grow to 10 percent to 15 percent by 2012.
    Why is print so popular – ease of highlighting, note taking, sharing and possibility of selling book back at the end of the year.
    Customizable textbooks
    Macmillan : DynamicBooks, which will allow college instructors to edit digital editions of textbooks and customize them for their individual classes.
    McGraw Hill Create - ability to easily create custom textbooks using a self-service system
    Open Models with commercial content
    WebAssign content to complement Connexions (Rice U - organized in small modules that are easily connected into larger collections or courses. All content is free to use under CC "attribution" license)
    FlatWorldKnowledge model.
  • Textbook rentals increased 300% in last 12 months . Students can save Students can save as much as 50% to 75% by renting, keeps more $$ in students’ pockets.
    *Many schools have started in-house textbook rental programs. http://www.eiu.edu/~textbks/
    *Commercial vendor Chegg.com has launched rental kiosks in college stores
    Ebook market - According to the National Association of College Stores, digital books make up just under 3 percent of textbook sales, although the association expects share to grow to 10 percent to 15 percent by 2012.
    Why is print so popular – ease of highlighting, note taking, sharing and possibility of selling book back at the end of the year.
    Customizable textbooks
    Macmillan : DynamicBooks, which will allow college instructors to edit digital editions of textbooks and customize them for their individual classes.
    McGraw Hill Create - ability to easily create custom textbooks using a self-service system
    Open Models with commercial content
    WebAssign content to complement Connexions (Rice U - organized in small modules that are easily connected into larger collections or courses. All content is free to use under CC "attribution" license)
    FlatWorldKnowledge model.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Open College Textbooks Created by Experts. Enhanced by Users. Free to All.
    • 2. College Publishing in U.S. • 19.1M students in 2010 • Average textbook spend $850/student (GAO 2007) • So,….U.S. industry size approx. $16b • Used books - 40% share but growing (rental, etc.) • So,….New books (the publishers) $10b annually
    • 3. Oligopoly • Cengage – 30% market share (Private) – Southwestern, Brooks-Cole, CourseTechnology, HM, etc. • Pearson – 27% – Prentice Hall, Addison Wesley, Allyn & Bacon, BenjaminCummings, etc. • McGraw-Hill – 20% – Irwin, WC Brown, etc. • Others (Wiley, BFW, Jones & Bartlett) • Last major launch: Course Technology→ 1987
    • 4. BUT……
    • 5. Source: “With Their Whole Lives Ahead of Them” by Jean Johnson, Jon Rochkind. Amber N. Ott & Samantha DuPont Prepared with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
    • 6. Authors Publishers Faculty Students NOBODY IS HAPPY
    • 7. SO……
    • 8. Open Education Repositories • Source of funding usually Foundation money – (Hewlett, Sloan, Carnegie, others) • $80M+ over last 10 years • MIT Open Courseware, Merlot, Connexions, Curriki, Carnegie OLI, etc. all major players • Wikitexts, Wikibooks, etc. • Is movement gaining traction? Answer is YES
    • 9. Strengths of OER • Access is equal worldwide (the web) • Community can create and evaluate resources “openly” • I can improve yours/you improve mine • Affordability (free) • Builds on open source momentum.
    • 10. Weaknesses of OER • Course Use/Adoptability not scalable (yet) • Often is Syllabi and learning objects – not enough core material for curriculum development • Funding dries up…oops (sustainability?) • Limited author pool – no comp. • Can get the knock for low quality
    • 11. AND……
    • 12. Authors Faculty Students FWK B&N Follett Apple Amazon Chegg Half.com BookRenter eBay Pearson, Cengage, McGraw-Hill Flat World Knowledge CourseSmart CafeScribe $ $$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ “Publisher 2.0”
    • 13. Great Authors/ Textbooks Transfer Control of Content The Flat World Knowledge Model Top Authors Provide Compelling Choices Alternate Formats Efficient Study Aids Free Open Audio Study Guides Practice Quizzes Digital Flashcards Soft Cover Print Audio Print it Yourself Kindle/iPad/Sony/etc. Professionally Developed Fully Supported Open License (BY-NC-SA) Open Platform
    • 14. Great Authors/ Textbooks Transfer Control of Content The Flat World Knowledge Model Top Authors Provide Compelling Choices Alternate Formats Efficient Study Aids Free Open Instructors “As Good or Better Books” Supplements & Support Control Over Content & Timing Affordability & Choice for Students. Authors Rapid market share gain Richer compensation Future facing model Get to be good guys Students Free (or low cost) books Freedom (to choose) Mobility & Efficiency Improved learning
    • 15. Textbooks, Open Educational Resources, and the Role of the Library Greg Raschke and Shelby Shanks, North Carolina State University Charleston Conference November 4, 2010
    • 16. Initial View from the Library  Typical scholarly communication problem – player with little power  Lacked even bargaining power  Teaching and curriculum side – not library issue  Assignment to student-led textbook initiative  Colleague from the UK  UNC system mandates about costs
    • 17. Revised View from the Library  Closer look  Dissatisfaction wide-spread – less dependencies on current system  Multiple players concerned about market  Ripe for alternatives  Libraries increase learning technologies and curriculum support role  We enter the fray on the edges
    • 18. Course Books Efforts  Collections and reserves programs  Libraries’ policy is to purchase one copy of every required textbook - about 4,000 titles with 14,000+ circulations in 2008/09 (240% increase)  % of titles circulating up each semester – word of mouth  Electronic reserve system – direct linking – leverage content  Partnership with bookstore  Ebook collections from Springer, Morgan & Claypool, etc. covering small number of required books (typically higher level courses)
    • 19. Course Book Efforts  Putting our dollars into market alternatives  Education, outreach, and expertise  Site on Alternative Models – Aim was to educate, and possibly persuade  White paper – Authored by GTA, initial foray into “open” textbooks  Advocacy – Libraries’ developed expertise; offer consultations  Resource for faculty seeking alternatives  Connexions, FlatWorldKnowledge  Dynamic, customizable content
    • 20. Course Book Efforts  Licensing and hosting introductory Physics text http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/etexts/Physics_Fundamentals/  Hosting faculty authored texts and chapters  Print-on-demand with Bookstore/Espresso Machine  Overhead is an issue  Site licensing, centralized purchasing, and fees?
    • 21. Course Book Efforts – Initial Conclusions  Library as best supporting actor  Textbooks and OER should be part of educational resource strategy and learning technologies partnerships  Quality and functionality are very important – students are generally divided – so need hybrid solutions  Market driven solutions hold most promise  Could be commercial market  Could be academic market
    • 22. Charleston Conference, Nov 4, 2010 Marilyn Billings Scholarly Communications Librarian University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA mbillings@library.umass.edu Open Education Resources at UMass Amherst
    • 23. 24Scholarly Communication Office, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries Beginnings  Open Access Weeks, 2009 and 2010 • Awareness  Sept 21, 2010 event • Education  Publicity / Buy-In  Resources • Scholarly Communication Office • OER LibGuide
    • 24. 25Scholarly Communication Office, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries OER Events During OA Weeks 2009 & 2010 http://scholarworks.umass.edu/oa/2009/oct22/4/ http://scholarworks.umass.edu/oa/2010/oct19/3/
    • 25. 26Scholarly Communication Office, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries University OER Event on September 21 http://scholarworks.umass.edu/oer/ More pictures about event are available at: http://scholarworks.umass.edu/oer_images/
    • 26. 27Scholarly Communication Office, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries Publicity  Local newspapers  Campus news  Buy-In  Faculty Senate  Office of Faculty Development  Provost’s Office
    • 27. 28Scholarly Communication Office, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries Resources Scholarly Communication LibGuide: http://guides.library.umass.edu/scholarlycommunication OER LibGuide: http://guides.library.umass.edu/oer