Success In Substance Abuse Treatment

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  • This is the main research question. Other questions as a way to introduce the topic can be asked. Those questions are, What specific methods or approaches are more successful at treating substance use disorders then others? What factors determine the success of individuals in substance abuse treatment programs?
  • This is the hypothesis of the paper.
  • One prevailing argument is that individuals appear to be more successful in treatment when external pressures are resolved. Childcare, problems with social support and a lack of spousal support all serve as distractions in treatment and often result in the individual leaving treatment early.
  • Research also shows that women enter substance abuse treatment with concerns of sexually transmitted diseases and communication issues (Rao et al, 2009). Specific interventions which include curricula that address HIV/AIDS prevention result in higher retention rates (Rao et al, 2009).
  • This is the second argument that supports the hypothesis. Treatment success is related to external motivation to change. Making a personal decision to change is a major factor in intrapsychic changes (Cunningham, Koski-Jannes & Toneatto, 1999). Internal changes are needed for the individual to make lasting changes that support sobriety.
  • Treatment outcomes are improved when individuals gain internal motivation to change.
  • This is the third prevailing argument that supports the hypothesis. Individuals are more likely to succeed in treatment when a therapeutic alliance is established with treatment professionals. Resistance to treatment can also be overcome by building a therapeutic alliance with counselors or therapists.
  • It is the treatment professional’s responsibility to actively establish a therapeutic alliance with the substance abuse patient (Barber, 1995). When a therapeutic alliance is formed the patient will begin to trust the professional. Trust is an important factor in treatment success (Barber, 1995).
  • This is the final prevailing argument that supports the hypothesis. Individuals appear to be more engaged in treatment when their family is involved in treatment (Rao et al, 2009).
  • Family based interventions improve retention of those in treatment as well as decreases their chances of relapse after they leave treatment. Studies show that teens in family-based therapy not only reduce their drug use during treatment but also maintain these treatment gains up to twelve months post discharge (Rao et al, 2009).
  • This slide addresses the strengths of the articles used for this paper. The first bullet is a strengths because using multiple treatment approaches shows that the hypothesis applies to multiple approaches. The second bullet is another strength of the articles used. This is a strength because it also shows that the hypothesis can be applied to different ages and genders.
  • This slide addresses the weaknesses of the articles used for this paper. The first bullet is a weakness because the formation may be outdated based on the age of the three articles that are over ten years old. The second bullet is a weakness because verbal reports from substance abusers is often exaggerated or lacks accuracy.
  • All of these future research questions would further this area of study and would expand the hypothesis.
  • Success In Substance Abuse Treatment

    1. 1. Success in Substance Abuse Treatment George M. Knoerlein Argosy University
    2. 2. Success in Substance Abuse Treatment <ul><li>Many individuals and families are affected by substance use disorders </li></ul><ul><li>For some treatment is successful and for others treatment often results in failed attempts at sobriety. </li></ul><ul><li>Why does treatment work for some and not others? </li></ul>
    3. 3. There are several factors that influence treatment success <ul><li>Research shows that individuals are more likely to succeed in treatment when external pressures are resolved, when there is internal motivation to change, when a therapeutic alliance is established with treatment professionals and when family based interventions are used (Barber, 1995). </li></ul>
    4. 4. Treatment success increases when external pressures are resolved. <ul><li>Female substance abusers often leave treatment early due to childcare issues and family issues (Rao, Czuchry & Dansereau, 2009). </li></ul><ul><li>Some treatment programs address these issues by providing some sort of childcare (Rao et al, 2009). </li></ul><ul><li>Treatment programs also include the resolving of other external pressures as a part of treatment (Rao, Czuchry & Dansereau, 2009). </li></ul>
    5. 5. Treatment success increases when external pressures are resolved cont. <ul><li>Once external pressures are resolved in treatment individuals can be successful at treatment. </li></ul><ul><li>Treatment programs that offer gender specific interventions report having higher retention rates (Rao et al, 2009). </li></ul>
    6. 6. Treatment success increases when there is internal motivation to change. <ul><li>Studies show that internal growth, level of maturity and perception in ability to achieve goals is key factor in treatment success for adolescents (Wisdom & Gogel, 2010). </li></ul><ul><li>People enter treatment as a response to external consequences. </li></ul><ul><li>However internal motivation keeps people in treatment (Cunningham, Koski-James & Toneatto, 1999). </li></ul>
    7. 7. Treatment success increases when there is internal motivation to change. <ul><li>A comprehensive treatment approach is a key factor in facilitating internal motivation to change (Simpson, 2004). </li></ul><ul><li>Working knowledge of treatment goals must be shared among person in treatment, their family members and the treatment staff (Wisdom & Gogel, 2010). </li></ul>
    8. 8. Building a therapeutic alliance is important to treatment success. <ul><li>Clinical outcomes are influences by establishing a therapeutic alliance with treatment staff (Darchuk, 2007). </li></ul><ul><li>Motivation for change can be influenced by a strong therapeutic alliance. </li></ul><ul><li>Therapeutic alliance gives a sense of hope to person in treatment (Barber, 1995). </li></ul>
    9. 9. Building a therapeutic alliance is important to treatment success. cont <ul><li>Treatment professionals must find out what motivates the patient. </li></ul><ul><li>Professionals must build a rapport with the patient (Barber, 1995). </li></ul><ul><li>Rapport results in the feeling of harmony and confidence (Barber, 1995). </li></ul><ul><li>Patients who trust treatment staff are more likely to succeed (Barber, 1995). </li></ul>
    10. 10. Individuals succeed in treatment with family based interventions. <ul><li>Studies show that family based interventions improve client outcomes (Rao et al, 2009). </li></ul><ul><li>Family based interventions result in more client engagement in treatment. </li></ul><ul><li>Family life and family relationships have strong connections to relapse. </li></ul>
    11. 11. Individuals succeed in treatment with family based interventions. <ul><li>Family based interventions improve the functioning of the family as a whole (Rao et al, 2009). </li></ul><ul><li>Studies show that teen in family-based therapy not only reduce their drug use but also maintain treatment goals after treatment (Rao et al, 2009). </li></ul>
    12. 12. Strengths of articles <ul><li>Research based on different treatment modalities. </li></ul><ul><li>Research based on various age group and both genders. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Weaknesses of articles <ul><li>Information gathered in research is based on verbal reports. </li></ul><ul><li>Some articles were more than ten years old. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Future Research Questions <ul><li>Is there one factor that improves treatment outcomes more than other factors? </li></ul><ul><li>Do all factors have the same effect on treatment outcomes? </li></ul><ul><li>Do all factors have to be present at the same time to influence treatment success? </li></ul><ul><li>Is family support and family based interventions more important in treating adolescents? </li></ul>
    15. 15. References <ul><li>Barber, J. G. (1995). Working with resistant substance abusers . Social Work , 40(1), 17-23 </li></ul><ul><li>Chatlos, J. C. (1997). Substance use and abuse and the impact on academic difficulties. Child and Adolescent Clinics of North America , 6, 545-568. </li></ul>
    16. 16. References <ul><li>Cunningham, J.A., Koski-Jannes, A. & Toneatto, T. (1999). Why do people stop their drug use? Contemporary Drug Problems, 26, 4 . Retrieved on March 2, 2011 from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/ 233177492?accountid=34899 </li></ul><ul><li>Czuchry, M., Sia, TL. & Dansereau, D. F. (2006). Improving early engagement and treatment readiness . Prison Journal 86 (1): 56-74. </li></ul>
    17. 17. References <ul><li>Darchuk, A. J. (2007). The role of the therapeutic alliance, treatment outcome, motivation, adolescent, substance abuse treatment, (Doctoral dissertation) Retrieved on March 1, 2011 from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/233177492?accountid=34899 </li></ul><ul><li>Rao, S. R., Czuchry, M. & Dansereau, D. F. (2009). Gender differences in psychosocial functioning across substance abuse treatment . Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. Retrieved on March 2, 2011 from </li></ul><ul><li>http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/233177492?accountid=34899 </li></ul>
    18. 18. References <ul><li>Rowe, C.L. & Liddle, H. A. (2003). Substance abuse . Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 29, 1. Retrieved on March 2, 2011 from </li></ul><ul><li>http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/233177492?accountid=34899 </li></ul><ul><li>Simpson, D. (2004). A conceptual framework for drug treatment process and outcomes . Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. 27 (2): 99-121. </li></ul>
    19. 19. References <ul><li>Sussman, S., Skara, S. & Ames, S. (2008). Substance abuse among adolescents . (Doctoral Dissertation) Retrieved on March 2, 2011 from http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/233177492 ? accounted=34899 </li></ul><ul><li>Wisdom, J., P, & Gogel, L. P. (2010). Perspectives on adolescent residential substance abuse treatment: When are adolescents done? Psychiatric Services 61, 8. Retrieved on March 1, 2011 from </li></ul><ul><li>http://search.proquest.com.libproxy.edmc.edu/docview/233177492?accounted=34899 </li></ul>

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