Prototypical Academic Library (PAL) Social Media Needs Assessment

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Bryan, Erin and Roen's final presentation for LIBR559M December 2009

Prototypical Academic Library (PAL) Social Media Needs Assessment

  1. 1. Social Media Training Plan for the Prototypical Academic Library (PAL)<br />Presented by:<br /><ul><li>Bryan Carnes
  2. 2. Roen Janyk
  3. 3. Erin Rickbeil</li></ul>Social media training committee<br />LIBR559M Student Librarians, December 2009<br />
  4. 4. Introduction – what is social media?<br /> “Social media is a rapidly evolving field of interest for information professionals. As the world wide web grows <br /> and progresses from Web 2.0 onwards, it is likely <br /> social media will grow exponentially…”<br />- PAL Social media training committee, 2009<br />
  5. 5. The goal of a social media program<br />&quot;To have a plan in place to train library staff members <br />requiring higher levels of social media literacy and knowledge, <br />and to provide them with a social media guide to turn to as a continuing resource.&quot;<br />- PAL Social media training committee, 2009<br />
  6. 6. Objectives of project<br /><ul><li>Conduct needs assessment of library staff
  7. 7. Provide social media training plan and manual 
  8. 8. Introduce staff to basic concepts and tools
  9. 9. Develop learning goals for library staff to achieve
  10. 10. Provide opportunities to implement tools </li></li></ul><li>Why academic libraries?<br /><ul><li>To acquaint library staff with social media trends and tools used by Net generation students
  11. 11. To help library staff learn new skills to meet the emerging needs of University community
  12. 12. To explore potential of social media at PAL
  13. 13. To implement digital innovation using social media</li></li></ul><li>Social media usage by researchers<br />(Corsa, Van Der Heyden, Kersten, 2009)<br />
  14. 14. Opinions of researchers<br />‘In the next five years, how influential will social applications be in research?’ <br />(Csora, Van der Heyden, & Kersten, 2009).<br />
  15. 15. PAL Needs Assessment<br /><ul><li>Environmental survey of “skill levels” of PAL librarians
  16. 16. Program based on needs assessment
  17. 17. Examine levels of social media knowledge:
  18. 18. External uses:
  19. 19. Connecting with users
  20. 20. Example: Using Twitter to send event updates
  21. 21. Internal uses:
  22. 22. Organizational enhancement
  23. 23. Efficiency in terms of time and money
  24. 24. Example: Using a virtual conference platform</li></li></ul><li>Social media training plan<br /><ul><li>A proposed 8 week immersion
  25. 25. One social media module or topic per week</li></ul> <br /><ul><li>Social tools used in academic libraries</li></ul> <br /><ul><li>Provide hands-on, guided learning paths</li></ul> <br /><ul><li>Allow for content creation & ideas sharing</li></ul> <br />
  26. 26. Week 1, Module 1<br /><ul><li>Introduction to social media
  27. 27. Review introduction
  28. 28. Read articles (2) provided
  29. 29. Watch YouTube video provided
  30. 30. Keep notes & keep track of questions
  31. 31. Present questions on your blog</li></li></ul><li>Week 2, Module 2<br /><ul><li>Blogs
  32. 32. Create a blog
  33. 33. Use Blogger, Tumblr or WordPress
  34. 34. Post 2x week during program
  35. 35. Use real information & post picture
  36. 36. Compare blogging platforms
  37. 37. Track progress & questions
  38. 38. Use RSS to subscribe to blogs </li></li></ul><li>Blogs or “Web-logs”<br /><ul><li>Educational & promotional use
  39. 39. “on average, a new blog is created every second of every day – and 13.7 million bloggers are still posting 3 months after their blogs are created” (p. 40)
  40. 40. Dynamic information environments
  41. 41. Duke University Library Digital Collection Blog
  42. 42. Levy Library Mount Sinai School of Medicine
  43. 43. Example applications
  44. 44. WordPress, Blogspot</li></li></ul><li>Week 3, Module 3<br /><ul><li>Instant messaging (IM)
  45. 45. Explore IM aggregators & establish account
  46. 46. Digsby, Meebo 
  47. 47. Start chat with others 
  48. 48. Take screenshot of chat, add to blog
  49. 49. Discuss +/- of an IM aggregator
  50. 50. Track training progress on blog</li></li></ul><li>Instant messaging (IM)<br /><ul><li>Provide real-time reference services ‘now’
  51. 51. Integrate many IMs into one application
  52. 52. Examples in academic libraries
  53. 53. Digsby
  54. 54. University of Pittsburgh, University Library System
  55. 55. Meebo
  56. 56. University of Chicago Library
  57. 57. List of IMs and SMS sites</li></li></ul><li>Week 4, Module 4<br /><ul><li>Media sharing in academic libraries
  58. 58. Focus on most popular
  59. 59. Flickr
  60. 60. Pod/Screencasts
  61. 61. Audacity
  62. 62. Jing
  63. 63. YouTube
  64. 64. Screenr 
  65. 65. Break into categories:
  66. 66. Photo sharing, voice & video</li></li></ul><li>Module 4: Media sharing<br /><ul><li>Objectives:
  67. 67. Create Flickr account
  68. 68. Screencast site & YouTube
  69. 69. Upload 10 photos to Flickr
  70. 70. Create screencast
  71. 71. Post to blog & upload to YouTube
  72. 72. Subscribe to several YouTube sites or channels
  73. 73. Track training progress </li></li></ul><li>Media sharing<br /><ul><li>Flickr
  74. 74. Storing and managing images
  75. 75. Tagging and RSS capable
  76. 76. Documenting events
  77. 77. Colorado College’s Tutt Library
  78. 78. Creating technical service manuals
  79. 79. YouTube
  80. 80. Video Sharing
  81. 81. Documenting Events
  82. 82. Advertising Programs</li></li></ul><li>Week 5, Module 5<br /><ul><li>Microblogging
  83. 83. Create Twitter account, upload a picture, change layout
  84. 84. Follow organizations, friends, libraries and librarians
  85. 85. Explore common URL shorteners 
  86. 86. Bit.ly, tinyURL
  87. 87.  Explore compatible Photo & Video sites
  88. 88. TwiPic,TwitVid
  89. 89. Send at least 2 tweets daily
  90. 90. Track progress on blog 
  91. 91. Inset Twitter widget on blog if possible</li></li></ul><li>Microblogging<br /><ul><li>Quickly disseminate information to users
  92. 92. Provide short, direct updates
  93. 93. Two-way communication
  94. 94. Follow other libraries & innovative leaders
  95. 95. Examples in academic libraries
  96. 96. Twitter
  97. 97. University of Illinois Undergraduate Library
  98. 98. Santa Barbara City College Luria Library</li></li></ul><li>Week 6, Module 6<br /><ul><li>Social bookmarking
  99. 99. Capture & store web links
  100. 100. Apply tags for findability
  101. 101. Delicious.com
  102. 102. Social cataloguing
  103. 103. Create catalogue of books, tags, comments, search your own & other catalogues
  104. 104. LibraryThing.com</li></li></ul><li>Social bookmarking & cataloguing<br /><ul><li>Establish Delicious.com & LibraryThing accounts
  105. 105. Tag web 2.0 news & articles
  106. 106. Add 30 books to Your LibraryThing catalogue
  107. 107. Track training progress on blog
  108. 108. Insert widget into blog if possible</li></li></ul><li>Social bookmarking & cataloguing<br /><ul><li>Feedback and social connections
  109. 109. User communities, folksonomies and thinking
  110. 110. New classification schemes & processes
  111. 111. Examples
  112. 112. Delicious.com
  113. 113. Penn Tags, University of Pennsylvania
  114. 114. LibraryThing
  115. 115. Museum of Anthropology at UBC</li></li></ul><li>Week 7, Module 7<br /><ul><li>Social networking
  116. 116.  Create new profile
  117. 117. Facebook, MySpace,LinkedIn
  118. 118. ‘Friend’ at least five people
  119. 119. Upload 10 photos
  120. 120. Create an event, invite friends to join
  121. 121. Upload a video to SNS profile page
  122. 122. Track progress in blog </li></li></ul><li>Social networking sites<br /><ul><li>Facebook
  123. 123. Harvard Law School Library
  124. 124. UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy
  125. 125. LinkedIn
  126. 126. Academic Libraries Advancement and Development Network
  127. 127. MySpace
  128. 128. Ball State University</li></li></ul><li>Social networking sites (cont…)<br />Hendrix, Hiarella, Hasman, Murphy, & Zafron. (2009)<br />
  129. 129. Week 8, Module 8<br /><ul><li>Wikis
  130. 130. For online collaboration with people & organizations
  131. 131. Web-based or server-based
  132. 132. PBWorks, WikiSpot, Wet Paint, Wikipedia
  133. 133. Experiment with PBWorks & WikiSpot
  134. 134. Compare the 2 sites & note differences
  135. 135. Note how Wikis can be used, discuss +/-
  136. 136. Track training progress and discuss on your blog </li></li></ul><li>Wikis<br /><ul><li>As an Intranet
  137. 137. University of Minnesota Library
  138. 138. As training tool
  139. 139. USC Aiken Gregg-Graniteville Library
  140. 140. As subject guide
  141. 141. Ohio University Library
  142. 142. For in-house use (daily staff updates)
  143. 143. Emily Carr University of Art + Design</li></li></ul><li>UBC TOTS & Social Media<br /><ul><li>UBC TOTS (Tools for Outreach and Teaching Series) offers training for librarians
  144. 144. Wikis, Virtual Worlds, Social Networking Tools, RSS, Social Bookmarking, Google, Real-Time Communication and Mobile Devices.
  145. 145. Courses offered in 2-hour sessions
  146. 146. Speakers, ‘sandbox’ & discussion
  147. 147. Tools for evaluation and assessment
  148. 148. Google Docs, PBworks and Survey Monkey</li></li></ul><li>Future directions<br /><ul><li>Evaluation of modules, updating modules
  149. 149. Completion certificates
  150. 150. Program offered to university community
  151. 151. Liaison librarians as facilitators
  152. 152. Introduce SM tools to department(s)</li></li></ul><li>References<br /><ul><li>Connell, R. (2009). Academic Libraries, Facebook and MySpace, and Student Outreach: A Survey of Student Opinion. portal: Libraries & the Academy, 9(1), 25-36. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.
  153. 153. Csora, C., Van der Heyden, M., & Kersten, F. (2009). Practising what we preach: Working together to further scientific collaboration. Learned Publishing, 22(4), 304-311. Retrieved from ArticleFirst database.
  154. 154. Hendrix D, Chiarella D, Hasman L, Murphy S, & Zafron ML. (2009). Use of Facebook in academic health sciences libraries. Journal of the Medical Library Association : JMLA. 97 (1), 44-7. DOI: 10.3163/1536-5050.97.1.008
  155. 155. Rethlefsen, M., Engard, N., Chang, D., & Haytko, C. (2006). Social Software for Libraries and Librarians. Journal of Hospital Librarianship. 6 (4), 29-45. DOI : 10.1300/J186v06n04_03
  156. 156. Ure, L., Atkey, K., & Miller, K. (2009). Exploring Social Software at UBC Library: The TOTS Series. Partnership: The Canadian Journal of Library and Information Practice and Research, 4(1), 1-5. Retrieved from http://journal.lib.uoguelph.ca/index.php/perj/article/view/932/1471
  157. 157. Weaver, A. (2009). Attending conferences virtually. Access – Caulfield East Then Alice Springs, 23(3), 26-27. Retrieved from http://search.informit.com.au/documentSummary;dn=098780048443873;res=IELHSS</li>

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