Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Consumer and public health in social media
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Consumer and public health in social media

2,207
views

Published on

An introduction for students in SPPH 581H at UBC

An introduction for students in SPPH 581H at UBC

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,207
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Consumer (& public health) in social media an introduction for students in SPPH 581H at UBC “…social media provides novel opportunities to embed and interject public health messaging into the daily online conversations of Canadians …” Schein et al. Literature review of the effectiveness of social media. 2010 Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 2. Social Media Week – Vancouver BC "Social Media and Health Promotion – Mashup” Friday, September 23 at 3:00 PM - 7:00 PM Hello Cool World Social media is a powerful tool for connecting and engaging with audiences around health promotion. Hello Cool World is an alternative ad agency with a history of developing campaigns to promote cancer screenings, immunization, HIV/AIDS education, organ donation, and sexual health care. In our afternoon session, we invite anyone with an interest in health promotion, community- based campaigns, and advocacy to join us. We’ll be chatting abouthttp://www.hellocoolworld.com/ our campaigns, sharing ideas and having break-out discussion groups over wine and fondue in our Gastown office Email: info@hellocoolworld.com for more information! Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 3. Public Health 2.0 Conference in TorontoPublic Health 2.0: Exploring innovative and participatory technologies — the fourth-annual student-led conference at the University of Toronto http://www.publichealth2point0.ca/ Twitter feed for PublicHealth 2.0 http://twitter.com//PH2_0Conference Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 4. History of eHealth consumers• In 1995, the U.S. National Library of Medicine releases PubMed free Medline searching• In 2002, 7 million Canadian consumers search for health information regularly• In 2006, “Googling for a diagnosis” British Medical Journal• In 2006, 1/4 of online health searchers say they check information sources• In 2008, Public Health Agency of Canada pulls Canadian Health Network funding• In 2011, Health 2.0 – social networking, e-patients “just like me” Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 5. Rise of the ‘active 2.0 consumer’ “…the pursuit of health takes place within a widening network of online and offline sources… whereas someone may have in the past called a health professional … their Mom, a good friend … now theyread blogs, listen to podcasts, update their social network profile and post comments on peer-to-peer sharing sites…” ~ Pew Internet & American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2009/8-The-Social-Life-of-Health-Information.aspxDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 6. Health status – Canadian consumersWhat’s the strongest predictor of health status for Canadians? • Your age? Where you live? • Income level • Employment status • Education level • Literacy skills • Racial/ethnic background • Social exclusion Canadian Council on Learning – Health Literacy http://www.ccl-cca.ca/ccl/Reports/HealthLiteracy.html http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/ph-sp/determinants/index-eng.php#key_determinants Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 7. Health status in CanadaWhat is the strongest predictor of an individual’s health status? Literacy levels (& media literacy skills) http://ihcrp.georgetown.edu/agingsociety/pubhtml/healthlit.htmlDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 8. Canada’s eHealth consumersQuestion(s):• One out of [? - how many Canadians] read at a grade five level?• An average Canadian health consumer reads at grade 9 … but [most health materials are written at what level?]Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 9. Canada’s eHealth consumers 1. One out of [how many Canadians] reads at a grade five level?  One in five Canadians reads at a grade five level 2. An average Canadian health consumer reads at a grade 9 level but [most health materials are written at what level?]  Most health materials are written at a grade 10 levelDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 10. Use of social media by consumers "Consumers are well ahead of other health stakeholders in adopting social media…" ~ Jane Sarasohn-KahnDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 11. The ‘engaged e-patient’• Just half of adults with chronic conditions use the Internet • once online, they are avid consumers of health information (2008)• Most internet users start at search engines when looking for health information • Very few check sources & date of information they find (2006)• As more consumers go online, more rely on the Internet for important health information • Fully 58% … say the single most important source of information was something they found online (2006) Pew Internet & American Life Project (2006, 2008 reports) http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2006/Online-Health-Search-2006.aspx http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/The-Engaged-Epatient-Population.aspx Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 12. Public Health Agency of CanadaVision• Healthy Canadians & communities in a healthier worldMission • To promote & protect the health of Canadians [by preventing & controlling disease, injury & disability]  http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/about_apropos/index-eng.phpDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 13. Challenges in pairing social media & health• Public health culture emphasizes surveillance over intervention• Limited uptake of patient-based science & evidence-based practice• Limited engagement of researchers / practitioners / consumers• Information dissemination viewed as “skill” more than “science”• Digital divide; low literacy levels; poor search skills• Low social media literacies Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 14. U.S. Centers for Disease ControlDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 15. US Campaign: “Questions are the Answer”• Description: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality aims to help patients take more active roles in their healthcare by asking questions, understanding their conditions and evaluating their options• Features: A Build Your Question List feature allows you to create a custom list of questions to print and take with you to your next appointment• Web Address: http:// www.ahrq.gov/questionsaretheanswer Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011 15
  • 16. Why health literacy is important: $$$ “…Improved health literacy may, for example, reduce the prevalence of diabetes in the population and possibly improve its management. Inaddition to enhancing the quality of life for many people, this could result in significant cost savings for the health-care system. In 2000, approximately 1.4 million diabetes patients used $4.66 billion inhealthcare costs. In 2016, there will be an estimated 2.4 million diabetes patients with an estimated cost of $8.14 billion…” ~ Canadian Journal of Diabetes (2010) “…Insulin is not a cure for diabetes … it’s a treatment” Dr. Frederick G. Banting, Nobel Prize Lecture, 1923Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 17. Consumer health information What is MedlinePlus?• Description: Health information website at the U.S. National Library of Medicine bringing together quality health information from government agencies and health-related organizations• Features: Medical encyclopedia and dictionary, drug and supplement information, interactive tutorials, easy- to-read materials, resources in multiple languages, surgery videos• Web address: http://medlineplus.gov Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 18. YouTube for health informationhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_fo6ytlmD0&feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWL67xOeQ-E Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 19. Search trends to detect flu outbreakDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 20. Google Flu Trends http://www.google.org/flutrends/Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 21. Public health & social media – United Kingdom“…public health could see a continued expansion of digital media as a means of targeting outreach and prevention initiatives to key health demographics through networks such as bebo and mumsnet. Local outreach workers such as counsellors, health visitors and health nurses could make themselves more available through greater presence in new media. Health protection could be supported by more advanced ‘syndromic surveillance’ systems to detect outbreaks of illness through monitoring patterns of digital behaviour in real-time, such as when people in one area search for information on the same symptoms …” ~ NHS, Patient-practitioner interactions in the digital age Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 22. Digital access to cliniciansDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 23. Concierge doctoring?Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 24. Norhealth in Norway http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-10/niop-nlt102208.phpDean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 25. Disaster management “…if we are to make good on the call for a shift towards people-centered early warning, then flood early warning/response systems ought to empower local communities to get out of harm’s way and minimize loss of livelihood …centralized, state-centered, top-down, external responses to crises are apparently increasingly ineffective…” ~ Flood Warning, mobile phones & dynamic mapping http://irevolution.wordpress.com/2008/09/07/mumbai Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 26. Questions to consider• Globally, how is social networking changing consumer health habits?• Should social networks be recommended? What do we hope to achieve?• Are social media like other “communication” or “information technologies”? • How might social tools be different, unique …or complementary?• How can we use social media to improve public health? • Improve health literacy levels • Mobilize knowledge & awareness of health & wellness • Modify health behaviours – improve community health http://www.blueglass.com/blog/social-media-for-social-mobilization/ Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 27. Towards a social networking model Public engagement & stakeholders ConsumersResearchers Health Patients Health professionals research Knowledge Consumer & Associations & translation … Community patient values … organizations Empirical studies Government Social agencies networks Evidence Health promotion & awareness activities (Public Health Agency of Canada) Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011
  • 28. How social media is changing public health• Social media is used in various ways in public health • connecting, sharing, “crowdsourcing/collective intelligence”• Evidence shows its value: • information dissemination, raising awareness • Surveillance, tracking disease outbreaks • monitoring conversations; promoting public health compaigns • ‘integrated risk communication planning’• Advantages • low cost, rapid transmission across Internet AND user interactions• Disadvantages • presents opinion as fact; blind authorship, lack of rigour & cited research Dean Giustini, UBC librarian | dean.giustini@ubc.ca | September 2011