An introduction to Twitter & Facebook for health care managers in Canada

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An introduction to Twitter & Facebook for health care managers in Canada

  1. 1. An introduction toTwitter & Facebook for health care managers in Canada Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  2. 2. Purpose• The goal is to introduce Twitter and Facebook• Our focus will be on practical aspects• Focus on health care applications• Review key principles in using social media tools• Guide you in choosing whether to use Twitter and Facebook Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  3. 3. PurposeAre you currently a registered user of? A. Twitter B. Facebook C. Both D. Neither Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  4. 4. Twitter and Facebook• Twitter & Facebook are the most popular social media tools• Useful in social networking • What they’re good for • Typical uses in health care• Get to know these tools• Consider whether and how to use them for professional purposes Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  5. 5. Guiding Principles• Think in terms of professional needs• Who are likely users - specifically?• Are there better tools?• Some social media sites are blocked at the workplace• Free is not no cost Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  6. 6. Twitter• What is it?• How to use it? • Set up account • Send tweet • Follow others • Register cell phone• Who’s using Twitter in Canadian health care? Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  7. 7. Twitter• Free online tool for broadcasting & receiving quick ‘micro’ updates• Recipients are self-identified and self-managed• Twitter is micro-blogging• It asks: “What are you doing?” (trivial)• But also: “What’s happening now” (surprisingly useful) Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  8. 8. Sending versus Receiving• Use Twitter as a broadcast tool• Use it for you or your agency• Use it to rapidly disseminate updates to your network• Used it to automatically receive short notes • From organizations of interest (i.e., government, hospitals, public health authorities) Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  9. 9. Sending• Simple to use, fun even• Type anything in the What’s happening? box—up to 140 characters• Click on Tweet• Your tweet is sent to everyone who follows you• It appears in your online feed & timeline in chronological order Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  10. 10. Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  11. 11. Receiving Tweets• Find a Twitterer (by username, first and last name) at top of Twitter• Or use Google to search for “[organization name] Twitter [subject]” to see whether they have a Twitter page• See page of interest, select the Follow button to begin receiving tweets• Example: CDC H1N1 tweets Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  12. 12. Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  13. 13. Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  14. 14. Sending a Tweet Many pathways:• Twitter web site (“What’s happening?” box)• Cell phone SMS (text message)• Cell phone application (Twitter, Hootsuite, Seesmic, TwitterBerry)• Cell phone browser (http://m.twitter.com) Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  15. 15. SMS Sending SMS messages to Twitter• Your cell phone must be registered in Twitter• Access SMS (texting) feature on your cell phone; start new message• Put in toll-free Twitter phone number• Type your message (only 140 characters)• Send; your tweet will show up in your timeline and go out to your followers Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  16. 16. SMS Receiving Tweets on Your Cell Phone• Be careful! Text message fees apply• By default, even after you’ve activated your cell phone, you do not receive tweets on your phone from those you follow• To do so: • Open the profile page of someone you follow • Click on the phone icon to the right of the word Following• Same procedure to turn device updates off Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  17. 17. Mobile Apps• You can use Twitter on your laptop or desktop • But its real power comes when youre mobile• Here are some files of information to help you use Twitter on your mobile device:• Official Twitter Mobile Apps: http://support.twitter.com/groups/34-mobile• Seesmic Mobile - Versions for the iPhone, Android, Blackberry, and Windows 7 phone: http://seesmic.com/products/mobile• Tweetdeck Mobile - Available for the iPhone, iPad, and Android http://www.tweetdeck.com/• Hootsuite Mobile - Available for iPhone and Android: http://hootsuite.com/iphone, http://hootsuite.com/android Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  18. 18. Receiving Tweets Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  19. 19. Learning How to Use Twitter • How do you get to Roy Thomson Hall? Find Vancouver General Hospital? • Explore. Play around • Talk to some colleagues who want to try Twitter • Refer to on-line resources & help pages—FAQs http://help.twitter.com/ forums/10711/entries/13920 Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  20. 20. Bottom Line: Twitter• Broadcasting updates (e.g., case counts, treatment updates, announcements) is a common need in public health• Various means include press releases, e-mail, listservs, web sites – and, yes, Twitter Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  21. 21. InteractingHow can you currently manage or interacton Twitter with a big group? Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  22. 22. Interacting Commonly:• Good, old fashioned in-person meetings• Conference calls• E-mail, listserv• Project web site• Newer tools: Webinars; Videoconferences; Blogs, Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Google Docs, et al.) Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  23. 23. Interacting Considerations:• Group is too large or too dispersed geographically• Scheduling is difficult or different time zones• Information distribution is primary goal• Sending small bites of information• Feedback requires careful thought Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  24. 24. When & what to use in Social Media Teleconference, web Web Blogs, Facebook, Use When: E-mail, listservs conference sites Twitter MySpace Group is large or dispersed ü ü ü ü ü Info distribution is the primary ü ü ü ü need Asynchronous interaction ü ü ü ü required “Small bites” of info, interaction ü ü üFeedback requires careful thought ü ü Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  25. 25. What is Facebook?• Social networking on the web• Share information• Add friends & send messages• Update personal profiles• Join networks organized by workplace, school, or college• Chat with friends in real time Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  26. 26. What is Facebook?• Facebook is primarily about “life sharing”• Somewhat youth-oriented• A casual, unending party with no particular pressure to interact• Increasingly powerful and feature-rich, but increasingly complex Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  27. 27. Useful in health care?• Adapt as frequently updated web presence for you or organization• Reach younger audiences but only as they find & “like” your organization• We’ll see some examples Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  28. 28. Poll QuestionIf I write on someone’s Facebook wall, itA. Posts only on that person’s wallB. Posts on that person’s wall and my Facebook pageC. Posts to everyone who is a friend of that personD. Don’t know Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  29. 29. Bottom Line: Facebook• Lots of fun• Very powerful, but quite complex• Use for business purposes requires substantial up-front and ongoing investment of time and energy• Useful for health care? It depends on your needs Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  30. 30. Final ThoughtsWeak rationale to start using Twitter or Facebook : • “Everyone else is using ________!” • “It’s fun to use _________ !” • “_______ will allow us to reach today’s youth!” Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011
  31. 31. Final Thoughts Better Rationale:• Social media meets a clear, pressing professional purpose• It’s better than other more familiar tools• Patients are there: user base is established• Proven in the literature “because there is evidence”• Little training or user support needed• Inexpensive to support• Executive sponsorship is solid and well-informed Dean Giustini | UBC health librarian | Fall 2011

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