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Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion
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Dr. Randy Gittess: Your Smile Presentaion

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With decades of experience and hundreds of happy clients, Dr. Randy Gittess in Winter Springs (close to Orlando Florida) is the "go-to" orthodontist for you to call. For more information about braces …

With decades of experience and hundreds of happy clients, Dr. Randy Gittess in Winter Springs (close to Orlando Florida) is the "go-to" orthodontist for you to call. For more information about braces or other orthodontist related topics, visit http://www.gittessbraces.com/ or call 407-699-1200

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  • (Click to start show)
    Your smile is one of your most valuable assets.
    It’s often the first thing people notice about you, and it’s the focus of attention whenever you speak. Your smile reflects your health and your personality. The crowning glory of a great smile are those two rows of perfectly straight, pearly white teeth.
    A healthy, attractive smile is a source of confidence and emotional well-being.
    (Click to next slide)
  • But often, people’s teeth, lips and jaws don’t line up the way they should, detracting from their smiles.
    (Click to next slide)
  • This is what we call “malocclusion,” which is simply another way of saying “bad bite.” A bad bite can contribute to tooth decay, gum disease and even tooth loss at any age.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Fixing bad bites is the job of the orthodontist – a dental specialist who diagnoses, prevents and treats dental and facial irregularities.
    (Click to next slide)
  • All orthodontists are dentists, but only about six percent of dentists are orthodontists.
    (Click to next slide)
  • The educational requirements of orthodontic training are demanding, and include advanced knowledge in biomedical, behavioral and general sciences. Orthodontists must complete college requirements, graduate from dental school and have at least two-to-three years of academic orthodontic specialty training.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Orthodontists work closely with family dentists to ensure total oral health.
    (Click to next slide)
  • People of almost any age can benefit from orthodontic treatment.
    (Click to next slide)
  • In America, orthodontics made its first appearance more than a hundred years ago. In 1880, Dr. Edward Angle pioneered a system of categorizing dental irregularities.
    (Click to next slide)
  • And in 1900, he founded the first dental specialty organization, now known as the American Association of Orthodontists. Today, the AAO has more than 8,500 active, practicing members in the U.S. and Canada and more than 13,500 members world-wide.
    (Click to next slide)
  • To understand what’s involved in orthodontic treatment, let’s take a look at how orthodontists classify malocclusions:
    A Class I malocclusion usually refers to jaws that are correct, but teeth that are crowded, irregular or poorly spaced.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Class II malocclusion – commonly referred to as overbite – may or may not involve crooked or poorly-spaced teeth, and usually involves an upper jaw that is too far forward, a lower jaw that’s too far back, or a combination of both.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Class III malocclusion – also known as underbite – can involve several problems, including crossbite, and bottom front teeth that overlap the top. Class III patients usually have an upper jaw that is underdeveloped, a lower jaw that is overdeveloped, or a combination of both.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Most bad bites are inherited. Examples of these genetic problems are:
    · crowding
    · teeth that protrude
    · extra teeth
    · spacing
    · and missing teeth
    · or uneven jaw growth.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Other malocclusions are acquired. In other words, they develop over time. These can have a variety of causes, including:
    · thumb-sucking
    · dental disease
    · baby teeth that are lost too early or too late
    · and accidents.
    (Click to next slide)
  • An uncorrected bad bite may lead to other, more serious problems. Crooked and crowded teeth may contribute to poor self-esteem. They are hard to clean and maintain, which may lead to tooth decay, gum disease and, eventually, tooth loss.
    (Click to next slide)
  • A bad bite can also cause abnormal wear of tooth surfaces, difficulty in chewing and speaking and excessive stress on the bone that supports the teeth and gum tissue.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Here are some signs parents can watch for that might indicate the need for a visit with the orthodontist, possibly even before permanent teeth come in:
    (Click for each bullet point below)
    · Early or late loss of baby teeth
    · Difficulty in chewing or biting
    · Breathing through the mouth
    · Thumb-sucking
    · Crowded, misplaced or blocked-out teeth
    (Click to next slide)
  • (Bullet points continue from previous slide)
    (Click for each bullet point below)
    · A jaw that is too far forward or back
    · Protruding teeth
    · Upper and lower teeth that don’t meet, or meet in an abnormal way
    · An unbalanced facial appearance
    · Grinding or clenching of the teeth
    (Click to next slide)
  • The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that no matter how young your child is, if you notice any of the early indicators of possible problems, he or she should have an orthodontic check-up right away. And the American Association of Orthodontists recommends that every child should have an orthodontic check-up no later than age 7.
    (Click to next slide)
  • By checking children early, we can spot subtle problems with teeth or jaw growth, determine if treatment is needed, and, if so, when it should start. That’s key, because for each patient, there’s an ideal time to begin orthodontic treatment in order to achieve the best results. Orthodontists have the skill to determine when the time is just right.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Even if a problem is detected, immediate treatment may not be recommended. Chances are, the orthodontist will take a “wait-and-see” approach—checking your child from time to time as the permanent teeth come in and the jaw and face continue to grow.
    (Click to next slide)
  • The good news is: orthodontic treatment to correct a problem—in some cases, even when the patient still has some baby teeth—may keep more serious problems from developing—and may make treatment at a later age shorter or less complicated.
    (Click to next slide)
  • In some cases where early treatment is recommended, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the child will wear braces.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Typically, early treatment involves the use of materials and techniques to guide the growth of young bones as adult teeth are emerging—creating a better environment for those new permanent teeth.
    (Click to next slide)
  • These appliances may be removable or “fixed” in the mouth. They may be made of metal, ceramic or plastic.
    (Click to next slide)
  • No matter when treatment begins, it always has a common purpose: to use gentle pressure over time to direct teeth and jaws into their proper positions.
    (Click to next slide)
  • “Active treatment” generally begins when the orthodontist places custom-made braces or other corrective appliances, according to the problem being treated.
    (Click to next slide)
  • How long does the process take? Although every case is different, patients generally wear braces from one to three years. Treatment times vary with several factors, including the severity of the problem being corrected, how well the patient follows the orthodontist’s instructions for wearing appliances and how well the patient attends to oral hygiene.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Patients who brush and floss thoroughly; avoid hard or sticky foods; wear their appliances as instructed; and keep their appointments usually finish treatment on-time and with excellent results.
    (Click to next slide)
  • After the braces are removed, the patient often wears a retainer for some time to keep, or “retain,” the teeth in their new positions. The orthodontist will determine how long the retainer needs to be worn.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Teeth continue to change over a lifetime, so many patients continue periodic orthodontic visits even after the retainer phase to ensure that the teeth stay properly aligned.
    (Click to next slide)
  • While people seek the help of an orthodontist to correct bad bites, it is always necessary to continue to see the family dentist at least every six months for regular check-ups and professional cleanings. And, it’s sometimes necessary to use the services of other dental specialists. An oral surgeon may be needed to help with problems related to jaw malformation or misalignment. A periodontist may be needed to treat gum disease. In consultation with the patient’s dentist, the orthodontist will work together with other dental specialists, as a team, to bring the patient to optimal dental health.
    (Click to next slide)
  • While you may consider orthodontic treatment to be primarily for kids, the fact is, one in five new orthodontic patients is an adult.
    (Click to next slide)
  • That’s because a person’s age need not be a consideration in getting a great smile. In fact, whether we’re treating adults or teens, the processes involved in orthodontic treatment are the same. The key factor in determining your prospects for an improved smile and dental health, is the health of your teeth, gums and supporting bone … all things we orthodontists consider before recommending treatment.
    (Click to next slide)
  • With today’s orthodontic technology, both growing patients and adults who wear braces can feel good about how they look while they’re in treatment.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Metal brackets are much smaller than they used to be. Even less noticeable are clear braces made of a ceramic material.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Or for those that want to be noticed – braces now come in a variety of fun designs and you can get rubber bands in every color imaginable.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Now, let’s talk about cost. The fee for an individual’s orthodontic treatment will depend on many factors, including how severe the problem is, how complex the treatment is, and how long the treatment lasts.
    (Click to next slide)
  • However, patients today are finding that braces are more affordable than ever. Dollar for dollar, when you consider the lifetime benefits of orthodontic treatment, it truly is a great value. And most orthodontists offer many flexible payments options with monthly payments spread over the course of treatment.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Successful orthodontic treatment is the result of teamwork. Achieving healthy, beautiful smiles requires a partnership that involves the orthodontist, the family dentist, the orthodontic staff and the patient and the parents.
    (Click to next slide)
  • The orthodontist provides the expertise, the treatment plan and the techniques to straighten teeth and align jaws.
    (Click to next slide)
  • The family dentist helps make sure that teeth and gums stay clean and healthy.
    (Click to next slide)
  • But the patient is the real key. To get the best results, the patient must follow the orthodontist’s instructions carefully and practice good oral hygiene during treatment.
    (Click to next slide)
  • Orthodontic treatment can achieve dramatic results.
    (Click to next slide)
  • (No speaking – let the pictures speak for themselves)
    (Click to next slide)
  • (No speaking – let the pictures speak for themselves)
    (Click to next slide)
  • By working together, the orthodontist, family dentist and especially a cooperative patient who follows the orthodontist’s instructions can create a healthy, beautiful smile that’s good for life.
    (Click to next slide)
  • (Click to next slide)
  • Does anyone have any questions?
    (Click to next slide)
  • You can find orthodontists near you at this Web address. Or ask your family dentist for a referral, or contact me.
    Thank you all for being here.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Can lead to • Tooth decay • Gum disease • Tooth loss.
    • 2. A Dental Specialist • Diagnosis • Prevention • Treatment of dental and facial irregularities.
    • 3. All orthodontists are dentists. About 6% of dentists are orthodontists.
    • 4. A Dental Specialist • 2-3 years academic specialty training.
    • 5. Works with your dentist.
    • 6. Treats all ages • Children • Teens • Adults.
    • 7. Dr. Edward Angle pioneered a system of categorizing dental irregularities.
    • 8. Dr. Edward Angle founded the AAO.
    • 9. Class I Teeth are crowded, irregular or poorly spaced.
    • 10. Class II Overbite.
    • 11. Class III Underbite.
    • 12. • Crowding • Teeth that protrude • Extra teeth • Spacing • Missing teeth • Uneven jaw growth.
    • 13. • Thumb sucking • Dental disease • Baby teeth lost too early or late • Accidents.
    • 14. An uncorrected bad bite may lead to • Tooth decay • Gum disease • Tooth loss • Poor self-esteem
    • 15. An uncorrected bad bite may lead to • Abnormal wear of teeth • Difficulty in chewing and speaking • Stress on bone and gum tissue.
    • 16. Signs your child may need to see an orthodontist • Early or late loss of baby teeth • Difficulty in chewing or biting • Breathing through the mouth • Thumb-sucking beyond age 6 • Crowded, misplaced or blocked-out teeth.
    • 17. Signs your child may need to see an orthodontist • A jaw that is too far forward or back • Protruding teeth • Upper and lower teeth that don’t meet, or meet in an abnormal way • An unbalanced facial appearance • Grinding or clenching of the teeth.
    • 18. No later than Age 7.
    • 19. • Check problems with teeth or jaw growth • Determine if treatment is needed • Advise when treatment should start.
    • 20. • Immediate treatment may not be recommended • May monitor your child’s development.
    • 21. When advised, early orthodontic treatment may be beneficial.
    • 22. Guide the growth of young bones.
    • 23. Removable or fixed.
    • 24. Gentle pressure over time.
    • 25. Active Treatment.
    • 26. 1 – 3 Years Varies by • Severity of problem • Patient compliance • Oral hygiene.
    • 27. Best Results • Avoid hard or sticky foods • Follow instructions • Keep appointments.
    • 28. Keep the teeth in their new positions.
    • 29. Many patients continue periodic orthodontic visits.
    • 30. • Orthodontist • Dentist • Other dental specialists as needed.
    • 31. 1 in 5 new patients is an adult.
    • 32. Your orthodontist will consider the health of your: • Teeth • Gums • Supporting Bone.
    • 33. • Smaller • Less noticeable • More comfortable.
    • 34. • Fun new designs • Choice of colors.
    • 35. Dependent upon • Type of problem • Complexity of treatment • Length of treatment.
    • 36. More affordable than ever • Lifetime benefits • A great value!
    • 37. Successful orthodontic treatment is the result of TEAMWORK. Orthodontist Family Dentist Patient Orthodontic Staff Patient’s Parents
    • 38. The orthodontist provides the expertise.
    • 39. The family dentist monitors the health of the teeth and gums.
    • 40. The patient carefully follows instructions.
    • 41. Before During After The results can be dramatic.
    • 42. After Before A new smile.
    • 43. Before After Before New confidence. After
    • 44. Before After Before Better oral health. After

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