European
Civil Protection
Dissemination and
Display of Information
Gisli Olafsson – Consultant
Disaster
• Relate as People
• Orgs are the
problem
• People are the
solution
Normal (routine
emergencies)
• People relate ...
The IM chain
Input Throughput Output
Collect Analyse DisseminateProcess
Timely information is important to
sustain collabo...
Information Economics
Displaying Information
Displaying Information
• When
• Where?
• Why?
• For whom?
• How?
Arriving in country
Arriving in an affected country
• How do we „catch“ responders?
• How do we get information about them?
• How do we provid...
OSOCC Displays
OSOCC Displays
• The system for displaying information should reinforce
the purpose of the OSOCC which is to display situa...
OSOCC Displays (cont‘d)
• All displayed information can be viewed, simultaneously,
and at a glance.
• Who should update di...
Who are we displaying it for?
Effective OSOCC Displays
• Legible from anywhere inside the OSOCC
• Summarizes the status of various functions
• Summarize...
Displays during meetings
• Information displays can enhance
coordination meetings
• Ability to point to a location on a map
Who are we working for?
• What language should you disseminate
information in?
• How do you translate into local language?...
Information Dissemination 2.0
Group Exercise
• Plan your OSOCC displays
– What will you be showing?
– How will you organize it?
– Who should update each...
© European Commission
Thank you
gisli.olafsson@nethope.org
Gisli Olafsson
Skype: disasterexpert
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays
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Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays

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Training session which was part of the EU Information Management Course in Madrid, October 2010. This session is about disseminating information and especially how to utilize effectively displays in the operation center.

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  • When asked what was his most important discovery within the area of disaster mangement, Mileti said that 40 years of his work could be sumarized into this one finding.Mileti said we could define three phases of crisis. The first one is the Routine Emergency phase, something our fire figthers and police officers have to deal with every day. Then there are the disasters which overwhelm the daily responders and cause us to change our behaviour. Finally there are the catastrophees which luckliy only happen very seldom throughout our history.But lets look at these different phases and the behaviour of people during these phases. During the normal routine emergency phase, we look towards organizations such as the police to assist us in the problems we have. And when we interact with these organizations we related to the people we deal with through the roles they represent. In other words, when my house gets on fire, I call the fire department and the firemen will come and help me. I do not refer to them by their names or who they are as persons, in my mind they are representatives of the organization they work for.However during a disaster there is a radical change in our behaviour. The number of organizations involved increases and all of a sudden a coordinated approach is needed. But at this time the organizations become the problem. Political and sometimes financial motives of those organizations hinder them from working efficiently with each other. In the international humanitarian world we often see different UN organizations competing for the attention of the media and the donors instead of collaborating with other organizations involved in the same response. Very often the leadership of those organizations are playing a political game during these periods, something that can realy affect the efficiency of the response. But luckily there is a solution to this problem and in this case it is people. It is people at different levels of the organization which feel human emotions about those affected by the disaster and because of these human emotions are willing to break down and reach out of the organizational silos that they represent. It is through these kind of connection between people within the different organizations that work actually gets done. We must therefore learn to leverage and build up in advance those personal relationships between the people in these organizations.In the third phase, catastrophie, Mileti points out that society breaks down and the basic human instinct of survial kicks in. During this phase relationships no longer matter, only yourself matter. However he points out that lucklily this phase does not last for very long and only happens extreemly seldom.A key point to understand about his findings is that it is not a formal organizational declaration that transititions us between these different phases, but rather it is determined by the behaviour of the people involved.So keep this in mind as I go through the next few slides and discuss methods for effective coordination.
  • We all communicate our thoughts, feelings and ideas everyday. Communication is a complex system. It includes many variables that influence its effectiveness. Lets examine some of these components.First – we need communicators – at a minimum we will need a SENDER and a RECEIVER. Effective communication is accomplished when the SENDER transmits a message AND the RECEIVER accurately decodes the meaning. We know communication has been successful through feedback.This requires a number of steps to go perfectly to be successful!To communicate messages we use CHANNELS. A channel is the tool or method by which we communicate the message. It is generally categorized as written or oral. When we communicate orally, we may be communicating using verbal and/or nonverbal processes.The CONTEXT influences how well the message is received. Discuss with the group – types of Context Place – in the middle of a drill field, at a party, in a private office – the place can affect how the message has been received – Ask the class to share a time when a message was distorted because it was in the wrong place.Relationship – the relationship between the communicators influences – the same message from a person you respect and admire may be received completely differently than from someone you do not respect.Culture – the degree to which the sender and receiver share common values and beliefsStill there are many other variables that influence our ability to communicate effectively.
  • Paper-Tearing ExerciseThis meeting icebreaker only takes about 5 minutes to conduct.Give everyone a blank 8 1/2-by-11-inch sheet of paper. Tell them the following: "We are going to do something that will show us some important things about communication. Pick up your sheet of paper and hold it in front of you. Close your eyes and follow my directions-and no peeking — you cannot ask questions."Then tell them the following. "Fold your sheet of paper in half. Now tear off the upper right-hand corner. Fold it in half again and tear off the upper left hand corner of the sheet.Fold it in half again. Now tear off the lower right-hand corner of the sheet."After the tearing is complete, say something like "Now open your eyes, and let's see what you have. If I did a good job of communicating and you did a good job of following my directions, all of your sheets should look the same!"Hold your sheet up for them to see. It is highly unlikely any sheet will match yours exactly.Ask the group why no one's piece of paper matched yours. You will probably get responses like "You didn't let us ask questions!" or "Your directions could be interpreted in different ways." Then, lead them in a discussion about the need for effective communication.
  • The system for displaying information in the emergency operations center (EOC) should reinforce the purpose of the EOC which is to display situation awareness and to coordinate support for emergency response. EOC displays are the primary source of information about the scope of the emergency and the progress of emergency support coordination.Having all displays on the walls of the EOC has advantages over briefing books or individual computer screens. Wall displays are always visible, so there is never an “out of sight, out of mind” risk. And, perhaps more importantly, the staff does not need special training to find display information that can be only viewed one display at a time on a computer screen.The information displayed should be accessible to all EOC staff and updated in a timely manner. In the ideal EOC, displays surround the entire EOC staff. All displayed information can be viewed, simultaneously, and at a glance. This can be achieved by positioning displays around the EOC staff, on the walls of the EOC.For example, the EOC operations chief or emergency manager could stand in the middle of the EOC and brief anyone calling in on the telephone by scanning the EOC displays and reading emergency information. An EOC mass care coordinator could quickly view information on a display about evacuations and road closures while coordinating shelter transportation on the telephone.Who should update displays? It depends on the priority of the information coming into the EOC. EOC staff members should update EOC displays with urgent information. Specialists should update displays with routine reports.In summary, effective EOC display information* Is legible from the center of the EOC, a distance of around twenty feet for most EOC’s* Summarizes the status of emergency functions and critical statistics* Is sufficient to aid coordination* Is available at all times* Is organized by emergency function and are close to relevant EOC function coordinators.* Is easily updated and in a timely manner* Is visually appealing and with meaning that is self-evident. Updating displays should require no special training
  • Information Management Course - Dissemination and Displays

    1. 1. European Civil Protection Dissemination and Display of Information Gisli Olafsson – Consultant
    2. 2. Disaster • Relate as People • Orgs are the problem • People are the solution Normal (routine emergencies) • People relate as roles • People are the problem • Orgs are the solution Catastrophe • Society breaks down • No relationships – survival • Only happened a few times (Hiroshima) E=mc2 of disasters
    3. 3. The IM chain Input Throughput Output Collect Analyse DisseminateProcess Timely information is important to sustain collaboration. Different actors have different requirements to be informed.
    4. 4. Information Economics
    5. 5. Displaying Information
    6. 6. Displaying Information • When • Where? • Why? • For whom? • How?
    7. 7. Arriving in country
    8. 8. Arriving in an affected country • How do we „catch“ responders? • How do we get information about them? • How do we provide information to them immediately? • What are some of the first things they want to know?
    9. 9. OSOCC Displays
    10. 10. OSOCC Displays • The system for displaying information should reinforce the purpose of the OSOCC which is to display situation awareness and to coordinate support for emergency response. • Displays are the primary source of information about the scope of the emergency and the progress of emergency support coordination. • Having all displays on the walls of the OSOCC has advantages over briefing books or individual computer screens. Wall displays are always visible, so there is never an “out of sight, out of mind” risk.
    11. 11. OSOCC Displays (cont‘d) • All displayed information can be viewed, simultaneously, and at a glance. • Who should update displays? – It depends on the priority of the information coming into the OSOCC. – OSOCC staff members should update displays with urgent information. – Specialists should update displays with routine reports.
    12. 12. Who are we displaying it for?
    13. 13. Effective OSOCC Displays • Legible from anywhere inside the OSOCC • Summarizes the status of various functions • Summarizes critical statistics • Sufficient to aid coordination • Available at all times • Organized by function and close to them • Easily updated in a timely manner • Visually appealing and with meaning that is self- evident
    14. 14. Displays during meetings • Information displays can enhance coordination meetings • Ability to point to a location on a map
    15. 15. Who are we working for? • What language should you disseminate information in? • How do you translate into local language? • How do you disseminate to the local community? – Bulletin boards – Radio – Social Media
    16. 16. Information Dissemination 2.0
    17. 17. Group Exercise • Plan your OSOCC displays – What will you be showing? – How will you organize it? – Who should update each display? • Put together a dissemination strategy for your team – Towards response organizations – Towards affected population
    18. 18. © European Commission Thank you gisli.olafsson@nethope.org Gisli Olafsson Skype: disasterexpert

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