UNESCO | Touch and Mobile Technologies for the Classroom session 4
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UNESCO | Touch and Mobile Technologies for the Classroom session 4

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The UNESCO/CICT workshop on ‘Touch and Mobile Technologies for the Classroom’ will aim to address issues related to these technologies and beyond and delve into the intricacies of the subject......

The UNESCO/CICT workshop on ‘Touch and Mobile Technologies for the Classroom’ will aim to address issues related to these technologies and beyond and delve into the intricacies of the subject targeting high-level policy makers at the Ministries of Education in the Arab Gulf States.


Beyond policy level discussions the workshop will aim to sensitize the participants to the issues of preparedness for this emerging transformation.


Digital Content, Interactivity, Mobile Applications, Open Educational Content Standards etc. are discussed in details.


Location : Ministry of Education of Kingdom of Bahrain

Speaker : Giorgio Ungania

More in: Education
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  • 1. Touch and Mobile Technologies for the Classroom Giorgio Ungania | http://about.me/giorgioungania
  • 2. M-learning Vs. E-learningM-learning Vs. E-learning
  • 3. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learningMobile learning is the ability to obtain or provideeducational content on personal mobile devices such as PDAs, smartphones and tablets.
  • 4. M-learning Vs. E-learning E-learning E-learning is any dissemination of educational knowledge over the Internet. This makes e-learning a subset of technology-based training.
  • 5. M-learning Vs. E-learning Optical StorageM-Learning WEB 2.0 E-Learning Peer Connections LMS
  • 6. M-learning Vs. E-learning E-learningE-learning can be real-time or self-paced, also known as “synchronous” or “asynchronous” learning.
  • 7. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learningMobile learning is often self-paced, un-tethered and informal in its presentation.
  • 8. M-learning Vs. E-learning E-learning M-learningLecture in classroom or lab anywhere, anytime email to email instant messaging private location no boundaries
  • 9. M-learning Vs. E-learning E-learning Facts
  • 10. M-learning Vs. E-learning E-learning ChallengesDigitalization of National Curriculums
  • 11. M-learning Vs. E-learning Prof. William Rankin on M-Learning
  • 12. M-learning Vs. E-learning Prof. William Rankin on M Learning Defragmentation of informationDiscover new ways of seeing the full picture Library of information in one pocket
  • 13. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning Challenges Unlike traditional eLearning, which relies on fairly common web standards to make things work , onmobile devices there is a wide range of very different and distinct mobile operating systems.
  • 14. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning Challenges The real challenge is that the learners are usingdifferent smartphones with different operating systems.
  • 15. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning ChallengesQuarter Android iOS Symbian RIM Microsoft Bada Other2011 Q4 50.9% 23.9% 11.7% 8.8% 1.9% 2.1% 0.8%2011 Q3 52.5% 15% 16.9% 11% 1.5% 2.2% 0.9%2011 Q2 43.4% 18.2% 22.1% 11.7% 1.6% 1.9% 1%2011 Q1 36% 16.8% 27.4% 12.9% 3.6% 1.7% 1.6%2010 Q4 31.1% 16.1% 32.9% 13.1% 3.4% 1.3% 2.2%2010 Q3 25.3% 16.6% 36.3% 15.4% 2.8% 1.1% 2.5%2010 Q2 17.2% 14.2% 41.2% 18.2% 5% 0.9% 3.3%2010 Q1 9.6% 15.3% 44.2% 19.7% 6.8% 4.4%2009 Q4 7.6% 16.2% 44.7% 19.7% 7.9% 4%2009 Q3 3.4% 17% 44.2% 20.5% 7.9% 7%2009 Q2 1.8% 13% 51% 19% 9.3% 5.9%2009 Q1 1.6% 10.5% 48.8% 20.6% 10.2% 8.2%2008 Q4 1.1% 10.6% 46.5% 19.3% 12.2% 9.1%2008 Q3 0.6% 13.1% 50.3% 16.1% 11.2% 9.8%2008 Q2 2.8% 57.5% 17.5% 12.1% 10.8%2008 Q1 4.6% 49.5% 11.6% 10.4% 11.6%2007 Q4 5.2% 62.3% 10.9% 11.9% 9.6%2007 Q3 3.4% 63.1% 9.7% 12.8% 11.5%2007 Q2 1% 65.6% 8.9% 11.5% 13%2007 Q1 61.2% 8.7% 13.4% 16.8%
  • 16. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning ChallengesMobile content must be developed in different ways to work on all of these competing mobile platforms.This can add greatly to the complexity and expense of developing and delivering M-Learning
  • 17. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning Challenges Size
  • 18. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning Challenges Digital Divide
  • 19. countries of the region has driven the number of active mobile-broadband subscriptions and helped M-learning Vs. E-learning bring more people online. ITU estimates that by the end of 2011, around 30 per cent of the population in the Arab States were using the Internet. Compared to mobile-cellular services (and in comparison to other regions) both fixed-telephone and fixed (wired)-broadband penetration rates in the region remain relatively low. The penetration for fixed-telephone subscriptions reached ten per cent at its highest and has been declining since 2008. The number of fixed (wired)-broadband subscriptions has grown from one M-learning Challenges million in 2006, to an estimated eight million in 2011, but penetration remains relatively low, at 2.2 per cent (Chart 1). Chart 1. ICT developments, Arab region, 2006-2011*Connect Arab Summit Doha 2012 100 Mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions 90 Internet users Active mobile-broadband subscriptions 80 Fixed-telephone subscriptions 70 Fixed (wired)-broadband subscriptions** Per 100 inhabitants 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011* Note: * 2011 data are ITU estimates ** Data on fixed (wired)-broadband subscriptions exclude WiMAX subscriptions Source: ITU World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators database
  • 20. M-learning Vs. E-learning In order to provide a regional outlook on NGANs and services, this section focuses on 3G, WiMAX and LTE network deployments in the region. Annex 1 of this report provides an overview of the main operators in the region, and the technologies they provide. In terms of NGANs, the GCC countries tend to be the early adopters (Table 5 presents the launch date of different 3G technologies UMTS/ HSPA, WiMAX and LTE). Bahrain and UAE launched 3G services as early M-learning Challenges as 2003, and Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi Arabia followed in 2006. Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and UAE are currently the only countries to have launched LTE networks. The non-GCC countries that launched 3G services in 2006 are Egypt, Libya and Morocco. Morocco also launched WiMAX as early as 2006. Table 5. Launch dates of wireless networks, selected Arab countries Date of 3G (UMTS, Country Date of WiMAX launch Date of LTE launchConnect Arab Summit Doha 2012 HSPA) launch Algeria planned for 2012 April, 2007 Not launched yet Bahrain December 2003 September, 2007 Not launched yet Egypt July 2006 Not launched yet Not launched yet Iraq February 2007* 2008 Not launched yet Jordan March 2010 November, 2007 Not launched yet Kuwait April 2006 July, 2006 December 2011 Lebanon October 2011 February, 2008 Not launched yet Libya September 2006 January, 2009 Not launched yet Mauritania First half of 2009 N/A Not launched yet Morocco July 2006 2006 Not launched yet Not launched yet Oman December 2007 May, 2010 (Omantel /Nawras licensed) Qtel discontinued the service in Not launched yet Qatar 2006 July 2011 (Qtel and Vodafone Qatar licensed) Saudi Arabia June 2006 September 2008 September 2011 Sudan 2008 2011 Not launched yet Syria January 2009 Not launched yet Not launched yet Tunisia May 2010 2006 Not launched yet UAE December 2003 September 2007 September , 2011 Yemen Not launched yet 2010 Not launched yet Note: * 3G is only available in the Kurdistan region Source: ITU, national regulatory authorities, operators, Arab Advisors Group
  • 21. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning Challenges Section I. Regional ICT overviewConnect Arab Summit Doha 2012 Chart 8. International Internet bandwidth (bit/s per user), by region, 2005 and 2010 2005 2010 78678 12000 10935 40000 10000 35000 28772 30000 27244 8000 23947 25000 5655 6000 5464 20000 15000 11310 4000 10742 10000 2000 817 1652 208 607 5000 937 0 0 Source: ITU (2011a)
  • 22. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning Challenges Section I. Regional ICT overviewConnect Arab Summit Doha 2012 Chart 14. Mobile-cellular subscriptions in the Arab countries , 2010 Somalia 7.0 Djibouti 18.6 Comoros 22.5 Sudan 40.5 Yemen 46.1 Syria 57.8 Lebanon 68.0 Iraq 75.8 Non GCC countries 75.9 Mauritania 79.3 Egypt 87.1 Algeria 92.4 Morocco 100.1 Tunisia 106.0 Jordan 107.0 Bahrain 124.2 Qatar 132.4 UAE 145.5 Kuwait 160.8 Oman 165.5 Libya 171.5 GCC countries 173.3 Saudi Arabia 187.9 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 200 Per 100 inhabitants Source: ITU World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators database
  • 23. M-learning Vs. E-learning M-learning Challenges Section I. Regional ICT overview Chart 17. Percentage of individuals using the Internet in the Arab countries, 2010Connect Arab Summit Doha 2012 Somalia* 1.2 Iraq 2.5 Mauritania 3.0 Comoros 5.1 Djibouti 6.5 Sudan** 10.2 Yemen 12.4 Algeria 12.5 Libya 14.0 Non-GCC countries 20.2 Syria 20.7 Egypt 26.7 Lebanon 31.0 Tunisia 36.8 Jordan 38.0 Kuwait 38.3 Saudi Arabia 41.0 Morocco 49.0 GCC countries 50.6 Bahrain 55.0 Oman 62.0 UAE 78.0 Qatar 81.6 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 % Note: *data refer to 2009 ** data refer to 2008 Source: ITU World Telecommunication/ICT Indicators database
  • 24. M-learning Vs. E-learning A Personal Story Curriculum Obsolescence Underutilized technology LImited Wireless Access Distance Flipped Classroom Online video ( YouTube)Free Online Solutions ( Slide Share, Facebook, Twitter ) Online Testing (SurveyMonkey)
  • 25. DISCUSSION POINTS Digitalization of Curriculums cOpen Source vs Proprietary Solutions Arabic ContentWireless Access and the Digital Divide Giorgio Ungania | http://about.me/giorgioungania