Amaze generation phase 2 final - October 2013
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Amaze generation phase 2 final - October 2013

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The Amaze Generation are tomorrow’s society shapers. Today’s technological change is part of their lives – it’s unremarkable; they adopt it and change it at will. But how is it changing them ...

The Amaze Generation are tomorrow’s society shapers. Today’s technological change is part of their lives – it’s unremarkable; they adopt it and change it at will. But how is it changing them and how will they, in turn, change society?

We are following a group of 10-15 year olds (our Amaze Generation) over a period of five years to understand their digital selves. We want to know how they evolve behaviourally, how they interact with digital tools, sites, networks… how tomorrow’s generation will communicate and shape tomorrow’s technology.

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Amaze generation phase 2 final - October 2013 Amaze generation phase 2 final - October 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze executive summary The Amaze Generation is the first to have grown up in a world where every aspect of communication, entertainment, social activity, as well as their private and school lives, are entwined with technology. It is a switched on generation that lives in a state of constant connected communication, where technology is a base commodity to be consumed and exploited as part of everyday life. This report outlines the findings from the second phase of the Amaze Generation study; a five-year research project that closely follows a group of 10-15 year olds, in order to explore their use of and attitude towards digital technologies and the internet. The objective of the study is to understand the evolving relationship this group of ‘digital natives’ has with these technologies, and to spot trends and changes in their behaviour and attitude towards the digital medium. A key focus of this second wave of analysis has been on their interaction with Facebook.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Key findings Facebook use The main reasons this generation joins Facebook are peer pressure and the need to be kept in the loop with their friends, with 100% of the group citing ‘staying in touch’as a key reason for joining. Interestingly, the boys believe they are just as ‘nosey’ as the girls, when it comes to wanting to know what their friends are doing. Most of this generation is quite concerned with how they are perceived by others online, and are keen not to be seen as being immature. Some of the group even go so far as to remove older posts on their Facebook page, if they feel they are too juvenile. They are also quite critical of people they believe produce either too much, or uninteresting content. This generation is not currently interested in location services, such as Foursquare or Facebook places. Neither is the group very engaged with Facebook games, which they generally view as boring or childish. A key Facebook feature that both boys and girls seem to value is Chat, which most people admit they don’t log out of, and which seems to have superceded MSN’s Instant Messenger tool. This generation is fairly open to accepting new friends on Facebook, accepting people based on the number of mutual friends they have, even if they don’t really know the person requesting to be their friend. This means that most people have a high number of friends. Can you imagine not having Facebook? “I can imagine, but I wouldn’t like it.” The gender divide Whilst almost three quarters of the Amaze Generation currently uses Facebook, twice as many boys are using the platform than girls. The boys also use it more regularly, with 70% of the boys using the social network every day, compared to only 40% of the girls. Boys also seem to be more interested in expressing themselves online than girls, with boys being three times more likely to update their status. The girls tend to be spectators more than contributors, preferring to ‘like’ rather than comment, and only update their Facebook status twice a week, on average, compared to the boys, who update their status daily. Surprisingly, however, despite their prolific use of Facebook, the boys seem to be less concerned than the girls about how others view them on the networking site. Brand engagement The study reveals that most brands are currently failing to engage with this generation, which prefers to follow their favourite singers, bands or celebrities. This failure to connect is likely to be due to the ways brands are trying to approach this generation, and they may have more success if they look to interact with this group in a more informative or entertaining way, such as via competitions, discounts or access to new products or services prior to their general release. Privacy and security Privacy and security are two main concerns for parents, although this study suggests that the Amaze Generation is much more aware of these issues than many give them credit for. The group said they take steps to protect themselves by not sharing their personal information online and also by changing their privacy settings so that only friends can view their information.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Misunderstandings This generation is very aware of how misunderstandings can be created when communicating via Facebook, with 80% of the group believing it is either very or quite easy for the meaning to be misinterpreted. Some of the group said they use emoticons to try to express what they mean. Perhaps as a consequence of this, very few within the group said they would express their emotions via Facebook, and thought that people who did so were only looking for attention. The exception to this seems to be shared experiences, such as exam time, when they felt comfortable saying they were feeling nervous about exams. Power of the Blackberry The majority of the group (95%) own a mobile phone. Blackberry is still the clear brand leader for this generation, primarily due to the BBM instant messenger app, which is used by everyone in the group who has a Blackberry device. Another factor driving the popularity of the Blackberry is the Facebook update functionality, which sends a notification to the handset as soon as there is an update on the user’s Facebook account. The iPhone is the second most popular phone brand, with most of the group thinking it has the ‘cool’ factor. Technology ownership and usage When it comes to the latest games consoles, Xbox Kinect is the clear console of choice, with almost half (45%) of the group having one in their home. Other new consoles, such as the Nintendo 3DS and the Playstation Move, however, are not nearly as popular, with none of the group currently owning either. The iPad is the clear market leader in tablet devices, with over half (55%), saying they have one at home. None of the group had used or had access to any other tablet device. Girls seem to be showing the highest increase in technology multi-tasking. Boys, however, still dominate the use of consoles. Interestingly, girls seem to start interacting with technology at an earlier age than boys. This seems to go against normal perceptions that boys are more ‘techie’ than girls.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze insights into the amaze generation Top 5 reasons for joining Facebook Reason Rated 1 Reason Rated 2 Reason Rated 3 Reason Rated 4 Reason Rated 5 Stay in touch with friends 62.5% 25.0% 12.5% Update my friends on my life 6.3% 18.8% 12.5% 18.8% Meet new people 12.5% 6.3% 12.5% Entertainment 18.8% 12.5% 18.8% 12.5% Fill up spare time 6.3% 25.0% 12.5% 18.8% Share my opinion 12.5% 6.3% Express myself 12.5% 6.6% 6.3% Stay up to date on news/events 12.5% 6.3% 18.8% 25.0% Because friends are on Facebook 31.3% 12.5% 6.3% 12.5% 18.8% Top 5 reasons for joining Facebook Percentage of respondents Stay in touch with friends 100% Update my friends on my life 56.3% Meet new people 31.3% Entertainment 62.5% Fill up spare time 62.5% Share my opinion 18.8% Express myself 25.0% Stay up to date on news/events 62.5% Because all my friends are on Facebook 81.3% Facebook It is clear that Facebook continues to play a key role in the Amaze Generation’s digital behaviour, with 75% of the whole group admitting that they currently use the site. Interestingly, there seems to be a gender divide on how many of the group use Facebook, with 100% of the boys using the popular social media platform, compared to only 50% of the girls. Moreover, 70% of the boys use social networks every day, as opposed to 40% of the girls. figure 1 figure 3 figure 2 Overall, peer pressure and the need to keep “in the loop” with friends appear to be the main drivers for the Amaze Generation to use Facebook. Staying in touch with friends is given as the key reason for joining the platform, with 100% of the group citing that as one of their top three reasons for joining. Staying in touch with their friends is more important to the girls though, with 83.3% choosing it as the number one reason, as opposed to 50% of the boys. There also seems to be a gender divide, when it comes to the other motivators for joining the site. The second most popular reason is because all their friends are on Facebook; for boys it appears that peer influence has a stronger effect, with 40% giving that as a key reason, compared to just 17% of girls. Interestingly, boys also seem more keen to use the site as a way of filling up their time, with 10% citing that as their primary reason for using the site, whereas none of the girls chose that as their main motivator for joining the site. Top 5 reasons for joining Facebook Female % of respondents Stay in touch with friends 100% 100% Update my friends on my life 50.0% 60.0% Meet new people 33.3% 30.0% Entertainment 66.7% 60.0% Fill up spare time 66.7% 60.0% Share my opinion 30.0% Express myself 16.7% 30.0% Stay up to date on news/events 83.3% 50.0% Because all my friends are on Facebook 83.3% 80.0% Male % of respondents
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze What they do on Facebook When questioned in more detail on their Facebook activity, the group seems to conform to the Forrester Social Technographics Model, which look at how people use social media and classifies people depending on their level of participation and interaction. As their most recent European Social Technographics* profile demonstrates, there are more spectators and consumers of content rather than contributors in this generation, which is mirrored in our results. The girls, in particular, seem to prefer to see what their friends and peers are doing, rather than post information about themselves, and are more likely to ‘like’ rather than comment. This seems to be the reverse with boys, however, who are over three times more likely to update their status than the girls, with the boys updating their status daily, as opposed to the girls, who only update their status twice a week. This behaviour underlines the boys’ main reasons for joining Facebook, which include a much higher propensity for sharing and expressing themselves online - this also seems to be evident in their activity on the site. The qualitative data collected from the face-to-face interviews, underlines this analysis. U pdated yourstatusLiked som ething Shared som ething C om m ented on som eone else’s status Senta m essage U sed Facebook chatPoked som eone G iven a gift 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 Mean In the last week how many times have you Female Male Gender In the last week how many times have you Mean Updated your status 5.2 Liked something 16.3 Shared something 4.5 Commented on someone else’s status 20.6 Sent a message 13.0 Used Facebook chat 18.0 Poked someone 1.2 Given a gift 0.2 Sample = 15 In the last week how many times have you Female Mean Updated your status 1.8 7.1 Liked something 25.2 11.3 Shared something 5.8 3.8 Commented on someone else’s status 8.4 27.3 Sent a message 10.6 14.3 Used Facebook chat 11.2 21.8 Poked someone 2.0 0.8 Given a gift 0.6 0.0 Male Mean Sample = 15 figure 4 figure 5 figure 6 *Forrester European Social Technographics 2010 report
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze This generation seems to be very aware of how their online activity may reflect on how they are perceived by others, with many of those interviewed revealing that they believe that how and what you post is seen as a measure of maturity, especially by the girls. This was further evidenced by the concern the group expressed over the amount and frequency of information being posted, with the majority expressing their opinion that those who posted large numbers of trivial updates were a nuisance and that ‘over posting’ would annoy others. This was demonstrated through comments such as:  “Some people upload too much.”  “People clog up my news feed by saying too much.”  “Some people are so annoying and all over Facebook.” Many of the group appear to treat this deluge of information posted on Facebook as spam, and tend to ignore it. They also do not seem to want to be viewed as producers of annoying posts, with the girls being particularly conscious of what others may think of their comments. Still influenced by those older than themselves, the Amaze Generation appear to appreciate it if an older friend ‘notices’ them and likes one of their photos or comments on their posts. They also seem sensitive to older friends potentially viewing how and what they comment on Facebook as a sign of immaturity. A number of the group admitted that, when they look back on past comments, they do not know why they said certain things or why they thought their comments or posts were funny at the time. They also said that they recognize this as an ongoing process, as they grow and mature. One member of the group even went as far as to remove old posts on her Facebook page, in order to avoid embarrassment and being seen to be immature. On the whole, the boys seem to be slightly less concerned about how others viewed them on Facebook than girls. Most members of the group, however, seem to agree that it can be difficult to interpret what people mean on Facebook, and that it is open to misunderstanding. When questioned about the confusion in tone and meaning, 80% said it was either very or quite easy for the meaning to be misinterpreted. “The point of Facebook is not to be private, to share everything and to stay in touch.”
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Many of those interviewed in more detail about misunderstandings being propagated via Facebook, gave an example of how they tried to avoid them and how easy it is for the meaning to be confused. Quotes from the group include:  “It’s much easier to confuse the meaning” and you have to be more careful of what you say on Facebook.  You need to “think before you speak, think before you write.”  “There’s no emotion, just words”… was one of the reasons given as to why it is easier for the meaning to be confused. One of the boys interviewed said that he always thinks about what he posts, including the tone of the content, and often uses emoticons, such as smiley faces, to make sure his peers/friends understand his meaning, if he thinks there is a chance his post might be misunderstood. The girls are also very conscious of the consequences of their actions online, with one admitting that she had recently fallen out with a friend. As a result, she said that she now tries to ensure that what she has written cannot be misinterpreted in any way that might be used against her. This generation seems to be acutely aware that any confusion or disagreement arising over Facebook, can have an effect in their real life. Some cited knowledge of arguments starting on Facebook and then carrying on into their life offline, and they are all aware that things have been taken the wrong way by people they know in the past. Interestingly, one of the children revealed in his interview that he has studied the difference between interpreting text/Facebook speak and proper written English, as part of his English GSCE. During the module they had to study two pieces of text, one in full written English and another in text speak and then discuss their interpretation of the two texts. With the full written English text, the whole class had made the same interpretation, whereas everyone had reached slightly different conclusions with the text/Facebook speak version. Another interesting finding is that very few of the interviewees said they would express their emotions via Facebook updates. The only exceptions appear to be when they refer to shared experiences, such as anxiety or nervousness ahead of an exam. Many seem happy to express superficial emotions, such as saying they find something exciting or cool, but are less inclined to discuss their deeper emotions. The whole group said they believed that people who talked about their emotions on Facebook were only doing so to seek attention or sympathy.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Brands The Amaze Generation is not currently engaging with brands on Facebook, although they will follow their favourite singers, bands and celebrities. From our face to face discussions and the interviews it can be seen that this could be as a consequence of not being approached by brands in the right way. Furthermore, those who admitted they had “liked” brands in the past also said that they did not tend to visit those pages again for updates. Therefore, this generation is not engaged or excited enough by these brands to make them want to revisit their pages. When discussing brands, however, despite no one saying they currently interact with them via Facebook, only 31% said that they prefer not to engage with a brand at all on Facebook. This shows us that the remaining 69% would potentially like to interact with brands on this platform, but are clearly not being approached in the right way. How would you like a brand to engage with you on Facebook? Keeping them informed is the most popular way this generation would like a brand to engage with them. Almost a third (31.3%), of the group said they would like a brand to approach them with some form of entertainment, with boys more than twice as likely as girls to choose this option. Girls are more interested in interacting with a brand to improve their knowledge, keep them informed and to talk to them like a real person. How would you like a brand to engage with you on Facebook? No Improve my knowledge 81.3% 18.8% Keep me informed 56.3% 43.8% Talking to me like a real person 81.3% 18.8% Entertain me 68.8% 31.3% Connect with people 100% 0.0% I prefer not to engage 68.8% 31.3% Yes Im prove m y know ledge Keep m e inform ed Talking to m e like a realpersonEntertain m e C onnectm e w ith people Iprefernotto engage 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 Percentage agreeing How would you like a brand to engage with you on Facebook? Female Male Gender 40.0 50.0 of the group would potentially like to interact with a brand 68.7% figure 7 figure 8
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze What would encourage you to engage with a brand? The top three ways this generation said they would like brands to connect with them are:  competitions (37.5%)  discounts on future purchases (25%)  access to new products prior to their launch (25%) Again, none of the group is interested in being able to interact with and talk to people at the company or use them for customer service related reasons. They are looking to be engaged, but clearly want to gain something from this brand interaction. Discounts on future purchases C ustom erservice C om petitions Acess to new products priorto theirlaunch Being asked to com e up w ith new ideas forproducts Exclusive new s orinform ation aboutthe brand To be able to interactand talk to people atthe com pany Ifm y friends have follow ed/befriended them 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 Percentage agreeing What would encourage you to engage with a brand? 40.0 Ihave no interestin befriending brands Discounts on future purchases C ustom erservice C om petitions Access to new products priorto theirlaunch Being asked to com e up w ith new ideas forproducts Exclusive new s orinform ation aboutthe brand 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 Percentage agreeing What would encourage you to engage with a brand? Less than 13.5 More than 13.5 Age 40.0 50.0 To be able to interactand talk to people atthe com pany Ifm y friends have follow ed/befriended them Ihave no interestin befriending brands When we looked at this by age, the older children show a higher propensity for wanting to engage, or being willing to engage with brands. This would appear to coincide with spending power, as older children tend to have more access to pocket money to spend, and we would therefore expect discounts and promotions to become more of a driver for this age range. As the Facebook minimum age is 13, brands should only be targeting this older group via this platform. figure 9 figure 10
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze How many friends do you have? Intersperience* research found that those aged 13 to 16 have an average of 450 friends on social networks, with girls having slightly more friends than boys. The study we conducted into the number of Facebook friends for this generation seems to be closely aligned with the research undertaken by Intersperience in May 2011. Our research revealed that the over 13.5 age group have an average of 486, compared to the younger group with 271 friends. The girls have an average number of 512 friends, and boys have an average of 323, signalling a clear gender difference. The highest number of friends for a boy in this group is 740, compared to 1069 for one of the girls. On the whole, the Amaze Generation is fairly flexible when it comes to accepting friend requests, which helps to explain why so many of them have high numbers of friends. For example, even if they are not sure they know the person who has asked to be their friend on Facebook, they will often accept them if they have a number of mutual friends, assuming they must know them or that enough other people know them for them to be acceptable. Sometimes, the group will look to ask a friend for confirmation that the request comes from someone they know, but most of the group said they would accept a new friend request if they think they might know or have met that person. This notion of accepting someone as a friend just because they have a certain number of mutual friends, raised the question of how this generation classifies its friends, and the effect this will have on their relationships as they mature. The boys seem to be more reluctant to just accept new people as friends, but only one of the boys says that he would only accept a new friend if he actually talks to them. It should be noted, however, that none of the group has ever had a bad experience on Facebook, such as being approached by complete strangers. Nor have any of them had any negative experience as a result of accepting someone they do not really know. The number of Facebook friends people have may continue to grow until at least university age, and even beyond, as their social circle offline naturally expands through entering higher education or the workplace. *Intersperience quarterly eJournal - http://www.intersperience.com/article_more.asp?art_id=45
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Privacy This generation appears to have a good understanding of the privacy settings on Facebook and are not as naïve as it is commonly assumed. They are all aware of the concerns around privacy and the sharing of personal information. As can be seen in figure 11 most of the Amaze Generation have changed their settings from the default so that only their friends can view their information. Interestingly, none of the group is really worried about their privacy settings, as they seem to trust the security of the Facebook platform. They are also very aware of how to be more secure, such as not posting your address or telephone number on the site. One of the girls said that even when setting up an event on Facebook she wouldn’t list her address on the page, even if it was a private event, she would ask people to send her a private message if they wanted it. This generation also seems to be very careful about what they want in the public domain, and is aware of some of the potential dangers of making this information available. How do you have your privacy settings Status, photos and posts 6.7% 93.3% 44 Bio and favourite quotations 13.3% 6.7% 80.0% 40 Family and relationships 6.7% 13.3% 80.0% 41 Tagged photos & videos 6.7% 13.3% 80.0% 41 Contact info 93.3% 6.7% 46 Everyone Friends of Friends Friends Other Total One of the girls said she thought it was ‘instinct’ to know what she should and should not post on Facebook, and reiterated that she thought it was important to know about privacy. When asked if they have any worries about privacy on Facebook we received responses such as:  “No because I have my settings on friends only.”  “No, its perfectly safe.”  “No, my privacy settings are secure.” The parents of the group seem to be much more worried about the security issues than the children themselves. “I haven’t (got any worries) but my mum worries about stuff”, said one of the group, “nothing bad has ever happened to me”, nor has it to any of the children in the group we spoke to. One of the Amaze Generation even spoke about how when he had joined the site his mum had sat with him to ensure his privacy settings were locked down. In the study, most of the group said that nearly every aspect of their Facebook profile could only be looked at by their friends. figure 11
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Boys are just as nosey as girls Facebook makes it much easier for a wider group of people to access the details of people’s lives. While this may be an obvious statement, it is interesting to note that, what was once termed as ‘gossip’, and was predominantly viewed as a girl’s activity, is now openly pursued by boys. Comments from the group on this subject include:  “I think we’re all the same when you’re on Facebook.”  “I wasn’t interested in what everyone else was doing before Facebook.” They also discuss that Facebook makes it easier to find out what your friends are doing and any secrets, which will only have acted to encourage this increase in nosiness. The boys still maintain that there is a difference between their activity and that of the girls. The boys will admit to being just as interested in the lives and activities of their friends they do not go on to discuss these things with friends or in the offline world. The boys admit they are just as nosy as the girls, but believed that the girls continued to discuss or gossip with their friends over the information they have discovered on Facebook. Facebook has increased how interested people are in the lives and activities of their friends and peers.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Location services have not yet made an impact on the Amaze Generation. This may be because they are still at an age where the majority of their social activity takes place in the home and at school. The appeal of location services is therefore unlikely to be aligned with their current lifestyles. As we have seen they discuss competitions and discounts as preferred ways for brands to encourage them to engage and therefore we may see an uptake in location services as they extend coupon/discount activity to offers which fit with this demographics’ lifestyles and spending power. The following gives an insight into the group’s feedback on location services:  Five have heard of Facebook places, three have used the service.  One person has heard of Foursquare, none have used the service.  None had heard of Gowalla, none have used the service. Most of the group seem aware of the varying roles or functions of different social media tools, such as Twitter and Facebook. Twitter is seen by some as a platform for a constant stream of updates, which they believe would be inappropriate for Facebook. Twitter also seems to be something they consider to be more relevant for slightly older people, with only 10% of the group saying they currently use it frequently. One of the boys commented that Twitter is not something he uses at the moment, but he thinks he will start using it and being more interested in it soon. Location services and other networks Games There appears to be very little interest in this group in Facebook games, with only one of the boys admitting he is really interested in them. This is despite the fact that most of the group seem to have all played games, such as Farmville, in the past. Most of the group appear to have moved away from Facebook games, citing them as being boring or childish. All boys we spoke to face-to-face have an Xbox and some preferred to talk via Xbox while playing a game, rather than using chat on Facebook, as they said Xbox offers a higher level of interaction. Chat Chat plays an important role in this generation’s Facebook activity, with the group as a whole admitting they don’t log out of chat. Interestingly, however, there is some indication that more of the group are only interested in talking to people via chat that they also speak to face to face on a regular basis. The new feature, which adds chat comments to your inbox, was viewed very poorly by the group and was disliked by everyone. Chat seems to have superceded MSN’s Instant Messenger tool for this generation, with few people admitting they still use MSN, and most say that they used to but now use Facebook chat.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Baseline Data and questionnaire trends and insights As this is the second phase of the study, it is anticipated that there will only be slight developments since the first report. However, there have been some interesting changes between the first and second round of interviews that are worth noting, as well as some new questions that were added to the questionnaire for this phase. The power of Blackberry All but one of the group we spoke to face to face said that they wanted a Blackberry if they didn’t already have one. There was one exception, who wanted an iPhone, whilst still recognizing that most of his peers have Blackberrys. The whole group agreed that most people they know have Blackberrys. The mobile Facebook application for Blackberry sends the handset a notification when anything happens to your Facebook profile or pages. As a result, the Blackberry users said they find themselves checking it every time they receive a notification, meaning they tend to access Facebook constantly throughout the day on their phones. BBM is a key driving factor for having a Blackberry, and is used by all owners. Mobile phones This generation’s use of Blackberry devices seems to be increasing, with over 30% of the group admitting to spending over three hours on their BlackBerry, compared to 20% in phase one. This increase is only in the over 13.5s. The younger children’s usage is more or less the same overall as before. Android use has also increased slightly amongst the boys, and Blackberry ownership has also risen in this period from 25% to 40%. The vast majority (95%) of the group now own a mobile phone. The number of text messages has also gone up since the first phase and the average number of texts sent a day now is given as 50, compared with 17 in phase one. When discussing their ideal phone, 45% said Blackberry, 30% said iPhone. When looking at the reasons behind these choices, the iPhone appears to have the ‘cool’ factor and is regarded as being attractive by the group, who described the iPhone as ‘awesome’, ‘it’s beautiful’ and ‘looks nice’. The BBM functionality on the Blackberry, however, is the key driver behind its popularity, with the perception that they also look nice being an added benefit. Whilst 100% of the group mentioned BBM, none of them really discussed any of the other functionality as being a key motivator for wanting the phone, as they appear to only really be interested in how they will communicate with friends, and how it looks.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Technology ownership When looking at some of the new devices that have come onto the market in the last year or so, it is interesting to note the impact, or lack thereof they have had on the Amaze Generation. Almost a third (30%) of the Amaze Generation now own an Xbox Kinect, and almost half (45%) now have one in their home. When you consider that the Kinect product only came out in November last year, that seems to be a very high proportion. Other new games consoles, such as the Nintendo 3DS and the Playstation Move, on the other hand, do not seem to be nearly as popular with this group, as none of the group owns either console and only one of the group has ever played on the 3DS. The duration of time these consoles have been on the market could have had an effect with this, however, as the Kinect was released prior to Christmas, giving more people opportunity to purchase or receive it as a gift. As the Nintendo 3DS is of a high enough cost it is unlikely to be bought on impulse but rather purchased as a gift, and we may therefore see a rise in popularity with this product going forward, especially after Christmas this year. The iPad appears to dominate the tablet market with this generation, with 15% of our sample now owning one themselves and 55% admitting to having one at home. The use of the iPad has also increased. In phase one, 25% of the group said they used it occasionally, and 5% said they used it every day. In phase two, however, 15% say they now use it occasionally, 30% use it weekly and 10% use it every day. iPad use has increased with 25% saying in phase one that they used it for less than an hour a day on average. In phase two, 20% said they use it for less than an hour a day, while a further 20% also admitted to using it for 1-2 hours, and 10% use it for 2-3 hours. In comparison, none of the children own or have used any other tablets that are now on the market, showing the complete dominance of Apple in this age range. of the Amaze Generation own a Xbox Kinect 1/3 KINECT IMAGE HERE
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Consoles The Xbox Kinect product has been very well received by this group, but there have also been changes in use of the older consoles. None of the group now plays with Gameboy, for example, whereas 25% of group claimed to be using it during phase one. The use of the Wii has also declined; in phase one we found that 35% of the group said they used the Wii at least weekly, while this figure has now dropped to just 10%. Use of the DS has also dropped; almost a third (30%) said they used the product at least once a week in phase one, whereas this figure is now only 10%. The drop in use of the Wii and DS consoles seems to be higher with the girls than the boys. The amount of time spent on the Xbox is also down. Whereas over a third (35%) of the group used to spend over two hours playing on it on an average day, this figure is now 10%. This drop is only amongst the boys. While ownership of the Wii and DS consoles is evenly split, usage is different. Girls tend to be more social when gaming, for example, with 60% of girls regularly using the Wii with friends, compared to just 10% of boys. When you look at ownership of these consoles, Xbox ownership, as you may expect, is much higher in boys (70%), than girls (10%). There seems to be a greater divide in ownership between the genders when it comes to Nintendo consoles; the Wii is evenly split, with 50% of the boys and 50% of the girls owning a console. This changes to 70% for boys and 70% for the girls with the DS. The Nintendo consoles seem to be used most socially, and are generally used to play with family and friends, compared with the Xbox which is perceived to be for the more serious gaming. The Nintendo consoles seem to be used most socially, and are generally used to play with family and friends, compared with the Xbox which is perceived to be for the more serious gaming.
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze Multi Tasking The Amaze Generation appears to be increasing its multi-tasking abilities, with more of the group combining the use of their phone with another device, such as a computer. In terms of gender differences, girls appear to be showing the highest increase in usage, with the exception of consoles. This indicates that girls are clearly now showing a much higher level of multitasking. Examples of this include:  Phone and TV – female use has increased from 20% to 60%, whereas usage has not changed amongst the boys  Phone and computer – usage has increased from 30% to 70% among the girls, and from 30% to 50% among the boys Phone and TV Phone and com puter Phone and console TV and com puter/tablet 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 Percentage Multi-tasking abilities Round 1 (%) Round 2 (%) 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 Website use When asked to identify which websites the group ‘could not live without’ Google was selected by 50%, followed by YouTube with 35% and then Facebook with 25%. Interestingly when pushed to select their favourite website both Facebook and YouTube were the clear winners with both sites accumulating 45% of the votes each. Formspring, which was not used by any in the phase one study but is now used by 20% of the group but only by girls. figure 12
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze What do your parents think of how much time you spend online? They are happy They ration m y tim e They think Ispend too long online Don’tcare 0.0 10.0 20.0 30.0 Percentage What parents think of how much time they spend online Round 1 (%) Round 2 (%) 40.0 50.0 60.0 70.0 Almost half of the group thinks their parents are happy with the amount of time they spend online, and the amount of people whose time is rationed by their parents has decreased. Parents are more likely to ration the time spent online by the girls (20%), compared to the boys, who did not seem to have their time rationed at all. Half of the boys (50%), however, believe their parents think they spend too long online, compared to under a third (30%) of the girls. Interestingly, the only figure which has changed for the boys in the group is the number of them being rationed, which has fallen from 30% to none. figure 13
  • A long-term study of today’s digital generation Second Report - Summer 2011 © Amaze When you look at the gender differences, however, there is a clear divide, which reveals that the girls start interacting with digital technologies and devices a lot earlier than the boys. The difference in age on average is just over a year, with girls starting to interact with digital technology at around a year and 5 months (just under) ahead of the boys. This goes against normal perceptions, as most people would believe the boys to be the more technically savvy gender. Em ail W ebsitesM obile phoneC onsole gam esO nline gam es C om putergam es 0.0 2.0 4.0 6.0 Mean Mean age when first used Female Male Gender 8.0 10.0 Socialsites M P3 playerDigitalcam era Instantm essaging 12.0 14.0 We asked the Amaze Generation what age they were when they first started using different technologies and devices, and discovered some really interesting results. On average the group are using computer games and websites before they are seven years old, online and computer games before they reach eight, and mp3players and digital cameras before they are nine. Looking at the youngest age this group started to interact with these technologies, however is very surprising, with members of the group saying they started to look at websites from as young as two years old; cameras, computer games and online games at three years old; consoles at four years old. The youngest person recorded using email in the group was six years old, with others claiming to have used social sites from the age of eight. Mean Minimum Maximum Email 9.1 6.0 12.0 Websites 6.6 2.0 9.0 Mobile phone 9.2 5.0 11.0 Console Games 7.7 4.0 11.0 Online games 7.6 3.0 11.0 Computer games 6.6 3.0 11.0 Social sites 11.0 8.0 13.0 MP3 player 8.6 5.0 12.0 Digital camera 8.4 3.0 13.0 Instant messaging 10.2 8.0 13.0 figure 14 figure 15 What age were you when you first started using different technologies?