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Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
Nation Report: Canada - Part 1
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Nation Report: Canada - Part 1

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  • 1. Nation Report:Canada<br />By Hannah Shipps<br />
  • 2. Geography<br />Occupying 41% of the North American continent, Canada is the second largest country in the world in terms of total area.<br />Canada also has the world’s longest coastline at 125,570 miles.<br />Boreal forests cover the southern portion of the country.<br />The southwest prairies are good for agriculture and the southeast lowlands contain most of the population.<br />The arctic regions in the north and the Rocky Mountains are covered in tundra.<br />
  • 3. Geography<br />The Great Lakes, located on the Canada – United States border, form the largest group of freshwater lakes in the world. They hold 21% of the world’s surface fresh water.<br />The St. Lawrence River and the Mackenzie River are the second and third largest rivers by volume of discharge, respectively, in North America.<br />Mount Logan is the highest point in Canada, and the second-highest point in North America.<br />Due to active tectonic uplifting, Mount Logan is still rising in elevation.<br />
  • 4. People<br />Today, there are approximately 34,265,000 people living in Canada.<br />About 4% of this population is made up of Canada’s Aboriginal peoples, which includes the First Nations, Inuit, and Métis.<br />French and British began to settle in Canada in the 15th century.<br />The Great Migration of Canada was a period of high immigration to Canada between 1815 and 1850. <br />The majority of these immigrants were from Great Britain.<br />
  • 5. People<br />Legislative restrictions originally favored British and other European immigrants, but in 1960 these laws were amended, opening the doors to people from around the world.<br />Since then, the Canadian government has put emphasis on the social importance of immigration.<br />This has resulted in a diverse, accepting, and multicultural society.<br />
  • 6. Culture<br />Multiculturalism itself is a strong part of Canadian culture.<br />Section 27 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms even says, “This Charter shall be interpreted in a manner consistent with the preservation and enhancement of the multicultural heritage of Canadians.”<br />Multiculturalism has become the norm in Canada.<br />Canada has two official languages: French and English.<br />Canada is also known for being very accepting of the LGBT community.<br />
  • 7. Culture<br />In the 1920’s, the Group of Seven became famous for its paintings of the Canadian landscape.<br />It is often considered the first uniquely Canadian artistic group and style of painting.<br />Robertson Davies (1913 – 1995) was one of Canada’s most popular authors.<br />He was best known for writing The Deptford Trilogy, which included the famous novel, Fifth Business.<br />Ice hockey is Canada’s official national winter sport, and its most successful sport in international competition.<br />
  • 8. History<br />In the 11th century, Norsemen tried to settle in Canada, but were driven off by the indigenous peoples.<br />In 1603, Samuel de Champlain – “The Father of New France” - began exploring North America for France.<br />He established Quebec City, the first permanent settlement and the capital of New France, in 1608.<br />In 1710, Britain seized control of Port Royal.<br />Nova Scotia was officially ceded to Britain with the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713.<br />Many French were expelled from Canada.<br />
  • 9. History<br />The French colony along the St. Lawrence River continued to flourish.<br />Canada was an important battlefield in the Seven Years’ War, after which France ceded almost all of its territory in mainland North America.<br />However, the British rulers allowed the French-speaking habitants to continue practicing their own religion, politics, and social culture.<br />The Quebec Conference and Charlottetown Conference in 1864 laid the framework for uniting the colonies into a federation.<br />The London Conference of 1866 led to the formation of the Dominion of Canada on July 1, 1867.<br />
  • 10. Sources<br />www.google.com<br />www.wikipedia.org<br />www.canadaonline.about.com<br />

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