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    Modelparagraph Modelparagraph Presentation Transcript

    • Cause and Consequence Model Paragraph
      • Mr. Gilliand
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2)
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2)
      Topic Sentence
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2)
      Topic Sentence In a cause and consequence essay, words that point out sequential relationships emphasize your attention to the assignment
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2)
      Introduce each quote from both the primary source and outside criticism. Select appropriate quotes from the play and outside sources to make the point you assert in your topic sentence. Use correct parenthetical citations.
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2)
      Explain your choice of quotes with original discussion of its meaning and connection to the point you assert in your topic sentence
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2)
      Introduce each quote from both the primary source and outside criticism. Select appropriate quotes from the play and outside sources to make the point you assert in your topic sentence. Use correct parenthetical citations.
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2). Another manifestation of this...
      Explain your choice of quotes with original discussion of its meaning and connection to the point you assert in your topic sentence
      • Desdemona’s unquestioning commitment to the idea of marriage also causes her to continue her subservient devotion to Othello, even after he openly accuses her of adultery. Having been called a whore in the presence of her attendant, Emilia, Desdemona professes the permanence of her love in the face of Othello’s unfounded anger, acknowledging, “his unkindness may defeat my life, But never taint my love” (4.3.315-319). Her unquestioning love is her primary motivation for obediently accepting her husband’s abuse. His own motivations are irrelevant to her and beyond her concern. According to noted critic Herm Von Freisan, “to the very last moment of this fearful scene, the threads are not severed by which Desdemona and Othello might be saved” (132). Von Freisan is referring to Desdemona’s love and willingness to forgive, which is evident even as she lay dying, strangled by her husband’s hands. When asked who has killed her, she tells Emilia, “No one; I myself” (5.2). Another manifestation of this...
      Transition to your next paragraph.