"I Really Didn't Do Anything", Seann Dikkers

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  • Does innovative practice emerge from traditional training??
  • I decided to simply ask the most innovative teachers in the country. How did you learn this?
  • This is how I think of round one.
  • I’ve identified teachers that are recognized as ‘experts’ and the first of their kind in practice. If the challenge is to have 21st century classrooms, led by 21st century teachers, I need to start by listening to what those exemplars are saying about their development.
  • The initial goal was to capture a variety of paths towards the common selection criteria to understand SCOPE. But all similar. ATTITUDE toward tradtional certification... They DONT credit traditional training to their innovation. 1) Didn’t finish HS for a music career. Followed with a “build your own degree” program. 2) Doesn’t have a teaching license after 18 years. 3) Never completed teaching certification.
  • Informal training: 1) I really didn’t do anything - teachers expressing a natural form of learning that creates the illusion of ease, even when recognizing effectiveness. 2) Clear outlooks, and frameworks that acknowledge they are not central in student learning. (JMc “students have much going on outside class” Couple things... One notice how there is the implication of a “Changing of direction” a relearning trad PD. Second notice that this REQUIRED reflection on practice as a core skill.
  • 1) Lifetime learning mentality. Old Gems. 2) Learning with students, shows willingness to ‘not know’, models inquiry methods, shows students dispositions 3) Seeing the error in own practices... and laughing. 4) Comfort level with learning as a robust engagement, not standardized product. Seriously.
  • Traditional sources of development for teachers are not, in the case of these few innovative practitioners, NOT the source of advancing skill towards the sorts of practices we want to see. Informal sources of PD are filling gaps. THESE claims are not to be made from such a small set. However, they were so similar, I believe I’ll find the same is true no matter how large the set. WHY? Because the traditional PD doesn’t address, 21st century practice, alt forms are needed.
  • GREEN - The field has a significant body of research here. BLUE - the work of GLS educators that still want to see 21st tools used to scale.
  • ONE EXAMPLE: 1) Wiggins and McTighe’s Understanding by design. 2) JMc “I started... playing with sort of on the fly simulations on pen and paper and things like that to try and get students more engaged”.
  • Story of Oregon Schools (New tech!... if you take this course... with project based model). Traditional programs are setting us back. On site OBERSVATIONS, collection, case studies, and qualitative research.

Transcript

  • 1. “I Really Didn’t Do Anything”
    • Seann Dikkers
    • University of Wisconsin - Madison
  • 2. Students Informal Traditional
  • 3. Teachers Informal Traditional Certification Courses Methods Theory Management Student Teaching
  • 4. PD Informal What do we know about the learning trajectories of 21st century teachers? Is there such a thing as 21st century professional development? What needs to be learned for us to develop relevant teacher training?
  • 5. What professional development trajectories have facilitated teaching with 21st century tools?
  • 6. Finding innovative practitioners?
  • 7. Interview R1 Community Context Tools Public Face? 1 Rural Higher Ed Private Broken Tech Speaker 2 Rural MS Math Public Online Tools TED/Speaker 3 Suburban HS Science Public Alt Mobile Speaker/Published 4 Suburban ES Writing Public Massive Multiplayer Speaker/Online 5 Urban HS Social Private Strategy Gaming Speaker/Published 6 Urban ES English Public Virtual Worlds Speaker/Online
  • 8. Wow, WoW lens
    • Second life in class
    • WoW in class
    • Strategy games in class; the book
    • Oh, and 1 to 1 laptops
    • AR Civic Activism
    • Broken Tech Learning
    • Media production guru
  • 9. Qualitative Study
    • Participants with a common quality; (Use 21st century tools to innovate practice).
    • Purposeful sampling of diverse contexts.
    • Interviews, administrative interviews, collegial interviews, and artifact analysis.
    • Phase 1 - n=6, 24 interviews (30-120min)
    • Phase 2 - n=37, 111 interviews (20-30min)
  • 10. Phase 2 Focus on national awards, innovative practices with technology, recognized achievement. (n=38) Focus on national awards, innovative practices with technology, recognized achievement. (n=38)
    • National Writing Project - Profiles in Practice (‘Best’ Practice)
    • PAEMST Presidential Awards (STEM)
    • TEDxED Speakers (Innovation)
    • Alfred Mann Foundation (Innovation)
    • ING Innovation Awards (Innovation)
  • 11. Data & Analysis
    • Interviews
    • Coding differences and commonalities.
    • Narratives, resources, assets, tools, strategies for practice, and attitudes toward professional development.
    • Tallied for recurrence. Clustered for major, minor, and discrepant data.
  • 12. Findings Traditional Training After music career: “ Your resume is your portfolio of music and those you’ve worked with and who has produced you.” After degree in history: “ I came in with an understanding of history as a discipline. I had gone through rigorous training.” “ I remember taking accounting classes just because they had computers; I had no interest in accounting whatsoever.”
  • 13. Findings Lessons in Practice “ I began to realize as a teacher that learning was not restricted to the four walls of my classroom. That learning could take place in virtual spaces.” “ I switched over...set up for the class, but during class I really didn’t do anything ...” “ Infinitely [better] than last year.” It was crazy. I realized when I saw those kids who were fearless and they were looking at me like, ‘What’s your problem?’... I said, “OK, this is where were going.” learning could take place [better] than last year.” It was crazy. I realized “ OK, this is where were going.”
  • 14. Findings Trial and Error “ I was no longer the expert. I was the newbiest of newbs.” “ I remember crashing and burning real bad on lectures. I think I’ve blocked it out [laughs].” “ You don’t know what the answer is when you start. You don’t know what the content is.” “ If they [want to learn] content you know nothing about, you have to be right there next to them.” “ I was no longer the expert. I was the newbiest of newbs.” “ I remember crashing and burning real bad on lectures. I think I’ve blocked it out [laughs] .” “ You don’t know what the answer is when you start. You don’t know what the content is.” “ If they [want to learn] content you know nothing about, you have to be right there next to them.”
  • 15. Findings Trial and Error PD from students PD from fellow teachers (f2f and online) PD from gaming media PD from vision of end experience PD from expertise in field
  • 16. Discussion Active Teacher Community Admin/Policy Students Passions Vision Play Space Trial/Error Formal Training Student Tuning Teachers Traditional Informal
  • 17. What will be learned? How to Assess? Actions? Engaging Lesson Plan Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe , 2001 and really quite a few others. Interesting work Lots of really good teachers, in classrooms. “ You don’t know what the answer is when you start. You don’t know what the content is.” Discussion What is engaging? What is real? Who is learning?
  • 18. Future Study Teacher Certification Leadership Practices Classroom Practices Classroom Design
  • 19. “I Really Didn’t Do Anything”
    • Seann Dikkers
    • University of Wisconsin - Madison
    • gamingmatter.com
    • [email_address]