Effective use of powerpoint as a presentation tool

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Effective use of powerpoint as a presentation tool

  1. 1. Showing things to an audience during a speech is as old as publicspeaking. In nearly all cases, showing an audience a physical thing,an actual object, is the best way to engage an audience’s attention.
  2. 2.  What has been turned upside-down over the past decade’s spread of PowerPoint, for most PowerPoint users, is that the “speech” is now mostly what’s on the screen, rather than what is spoken.
  3. 3.  1. PowerPoint, when displayed via a projector, is a useful tool for showing audiences things that enhance what the speaker is saying.
  4. 4.  2. Slides used in a presentation should be spare, in terms of how much information is on each slide, as well as how many slides are used.
  5. 5.  3. Unless you’re an experienced designer, don’t use the transition and animation “tricks” that are built into PowerPoint, such as bouncing or flying text.
  6. 6.  4. Above all, use high-contrast color schemes so that whatever is on your slides is readable. Unless you are a talented graphic designer, use the templates that come with PowerPoint or Keynote, and keep it simple—high concept design in a slide presentation doesn’t help in most circumstances, unless you’re in the fashion or design fields.
  7. 7.  5. Rehearse your PowerPoint presentation and not just once. Don’t let PowerPoint get in the way of your oral presentation, and make sure you know how it works, what sequence the slides are in, how to get through it using someone else’s computer, etc
  8. 8.  6. Get used to using black slides. There are few speeches that need something displayed on the screen all the time. If you include a black slide in your presentation, your audience will refocus on you, rather than on the screen, and you can direct them back to the screen when you have something else to show them.
  9. 9.  7. Concentrate on keeping the audience focused on you, not on the screen. You can do this by using slides sparingly, standing in front of the audience in a way that makes them look at you, and, if possible, going to the screen and using your hand or arm to point out things on a slide.
  10. 10.  8. If you show something on a computer that requires moving the cursor around, or flipping from one screen to another, or some other technique that requires interaction with the computer itself, remember that people in the audience will see things very differently on the projection screen than you see them on the computer screen.
  11. 11.  9. Don’t “cue” the audience that listening to your speech means getting through your PowerPoint presentation. If the audience sees that your PowerPoint presentation is the structure of your speech, they’ll start wondering how many slides are left.
  12. 12.  10. Learn how to give a good speech without PowerPoint. This takes practice, which means giving speeches without PowerPoint. Believe it or not, public speaking existed before PowerPoint, and many people remember it as being a lot better then than it is now.
  13. 13.  1. Write a script. A little planning goes a long way. Most presentations are written in Power point (or some other presentation package) without any sort of rhyme or reason.
  14. 14.  2. One thing at a time, please. At any given moment, what should be on the screen is the thing you’re talking about.
  15. 15.  3. No paragraphs. Where most presentations fail is that their authors, convinced they are producing some kind of stand-alone document, put everything they want to say onto their slides, in great big chunky blocks of text.
  16. 16.  4. Pay attention to design. Power point and other presentation packages offer all sorts of ways to add visual “flash” to your slides: fades, swipes, flashing text, and other annoyances are all too easy to insert with a few mouse clicks.
  17. 17.  5. Use images sparingly There are two schools of thought about images in presentations. Some say they add visual interest and keep audiences engaged; others say images are an unnecessary distraction.
  18. 18.  6. Think outside the screen. Remember, the slides on the screen are only part of the presentation – and not the main part. Even though you’re liable to be presenting in a darkened room, give some thought to your own presentation manner .
  19. 19.  7. Have a hook. Like the best writing, the best presentation shook their audiences early and then reel them in. Open with something surprising or intriguing, something that will get your audience to sit up and take notice.

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